645 episodes

Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

Decoder with Nilay Patel The Verge

    • Business
    • 4.6 • 20 Ratings

Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

    How Arm conquered the chip market without making a single chip, with CEO Rene Haas

    How Arm conquered the chip market without making a single chip, with CEO Rene Haas

    One of the more interesting quirks of the modern tech world is that there’s a really important company at the center of it all that doesn’t make anything. But its work is in your phone, in your TV, your car and maybe even your laptop. I’m talking about ARM, a chip design company that’s been through quite a lot these past few years, and I'm talking to Arm CEO Rene Haas.
    Arm designs the instruction sets for modern chips: Qualcomm’s chips are Arm chips. Apple’s chips are Arm chips. Samsung’s chips are Arm chips. It’s the heart of modern computing. Arm licenses the instruction set to those companies, who then go off and actually make chips with all sorts of customizations. Basically every smartphone runs an Arm processor, Apple’s Macs now run arm processors, and everything from cars to coffee machines are showing up with more and more arm processors in them.

    We want to know what you think about Decoder. Take our listener survey!

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/23137412

    Links:
    The Vergecast: The HDMI Holiday Spec-tacular on Apple Podcasts 
    Biden signs $280 billion CHIPS and Science Act
    Intel needs 7,000 workers to build its $20 billion chip plant in Ohio - The Verge
    What comes after the smartphone, with Qualcomm CEO Cristiano Amon - The Verge
    Why the global chip shortage is making it so hard to buy a PS5
    Nvidia’s huge Arm deal has just been scrapped
    What is a SoC?
    What is an ECU?

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. 
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Can software simplify the supply chain? Ryan Petersen thinks so

    Can software simplify the supply chain? Ryan Petersen thinks so

    Ryan Petersen, is the CEO of Flexport, ac ompany that builds software that integrates all the different shipping vendor systems you might run into as you try to get a product from a factory in China to a consumer in Idaho: rail, sea, truck. We’ve talked about the supply chain and inventory management on Decoder with a lot of our guests — the chip shortage seems to affect every company, and sorting out how to get products made and delivered on time is a pretty universal problem. But we haven’t really talked about how products get from one place to another around the world.
    So I wanted to talk to Ryan, figure out what Flexport’s role in all this is, what his bigger supply chain solutions would be, and why he’s leaving his job as CEO to be executive chairman and handing the reins to Dave Clark, who used to work at Amazon.

    Links:
    Dave Clark to Join Flexport As Our New CEO
    Flexport Wants to Be Uber of the Oceans
    At Google, Eric Schmidt Wrote the Book on Adult Supervision
    The real story behind a tech founder’s ‘tweetstorm that saves Christmas’
    Ryan's twitter thread

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/23126062

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. 
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Everyone knows what YouTube is. Few know how it really works.

    Everyone knows what YouTube is. Few know how it really works.

    Today, I’m talking to Mark Bergen, a reporter at Bloomberg and the author of a new book about YouTube called. Like, Comment, Subscribe: Inside YouTube’s Chaotic Rise to World Domination.

    YouTube has always been fascinating to me because it’s such a black box: everyone feels like they know how the platform works, but very few people have a real understanding of the internal politics and tradeoffs that actually drive YouTube’s decision. Mark’s book is one of the best of its kind I’ve read: not only does he take you inside the company, but he connects the decisions made inside YouTube to the creators who use the platform and the effects it has on them.

    This was a fun one – keep in mind that for as little as we might know about YouTube, we might know even less about TikTok, which is driving all sorts of platforms, even YouTube, into competing with it.

    Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23113078 

    Links:
    YouTube Partner Program
    Hank Green on Decoder
    iJustine


    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Rewind: How big companies kill ideas — and how to fight back, with Tony Fadell

    Rewind: How big companies kill ideas — and how to fight back, with Tony Fadell

    This episode was originally published on May 3rd, 2022.
    Tony Fadell was instrumental in the development of the iPod and iPhone at Apple and then co-founded Nest Labs, which kicked off the consumer smart home market with its smart thermostat in 2011. Tony sold Nest to Google for $3.2 billion in 2014 and eventually left Google. He now runs an investment company called Future Shape. 

    Links:
    Inside the Nest: iPod creator Tony Fadell wants to reinvent the thermostat
    General Magic - Trailer
    Inside Facebook’s metaverse for work
    Silicon Graphics
    Google is reorganizing and Sundar Pichai will become new CEO
    Fire drill: can Tony Fadell and Nest build a better smoke detector?
    Google purchases Nest for $3.2 billion
    Twitter accepts buyout, giving Elon Musk total control of the company
    Nest is rejoining Google to better compete with Amazon and Apple
    Apple Music Event 2005 - Motorola Rokr E1 / iTunes Phone
    Activision Blizzard hit with another sexual harassment lawsuit
    Nest buying video-monitoring startup Dropcam for $555 million
    What matters about Matter, the new smart home standard
    ZIGBEE ON MARS!

    Directory:
    Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple
    Andy Grove, former CEO of Intel
    Pat Gelsinger, current CEO of Intel
    Sundar Pichai, current CEO of Alphabet
    Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, SpaceX, and The Boring Company
    Jeff Williams, COO of Apple
    Matt Rogers, Nest co-founder
    Jeff Robbin, VP of consumer applications at Apple
    Steve Hoteling, former CEO gesture recognition company Finger Works
    Jon Rubinstein, senior VP of the iPod division at Apple
    Steve Sakomen, hardware engineer and executive at Apple 
    Avie Tavanian, chief software technology officer at Apple
    Scott Forstall, senior VP of iOS software, Apple
    Jony Ive, chief design officer, Apple

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22817673

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 18 min
    How the head of Facebook plans to compete with TikTok and win back Gen Z

    How the head of Facebook plans to compete with TikTok and win back Gen Z

    We’ve got a special episode of Decoder today – an interview between Verge deputy editor Alex Heath and Meta’s Tom Alison, the head of Facebook. Alex is the co-host of the newest season of Vox Media’s podcast Land of the Giants. This season is about Facebook and Meta. The season finale comes out tomorrow.
    Alex has been reporting for Land of the Giants for many months, and along the way he interviewed Tom. Facebook has a lot of challenges, but it seems like the biggest problem is TikTok: Facebook's problem is that it spent years – you spent years – building out a social graph that, it turns out, is less interesting than just being shown content that the company thinks you might like. Alison has been at Facebook for more than a decade and previously ran engineering for the News Feed, so he knows more than almost anyone about the history of feeds and where they are going.

    Links:
    Land of the Giants
    Facebook is changing its algorithm to take on TikTok, leaked memo reveals
    Facebook is revamping its home feed to feel more like TikTok

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/23092319

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Advertising is everywhere. Wieden+Kennedy CEO Neal Arthur explains how it works

    Advertising is everywhere. Wieden+Kennedy CEO Neal Arthur explains how it works

    One thing that strikes me, in all these episodes of Decoder, is how little any of us really pay attention to the advertising industry, and how deeply connected it is to almost other every modern business. After all you can start a company and invent a great product, but you still need to market it: you need to tell people about it, and eventually convince them to buy it. And so you take out an add on a platform and, well, the platform companies we all depend on mostly run on ads. Google’s entire consumer business is ads. Meta’s entire business is ads. And when we talk to creators, they’re even more tied to ads: their distribution platforms like TikTok and YouTube are all ad-supported, and a huge portion of their revenue is ads. 
    This week I’m talking to Neal Arthur, the CEO of Weiden and Kennedy, one of the few independent major ad agencies in the world, and maybe the coolest one? It’s got a rep. Weiden is the agency that came up with Just Do It for Nike and Bud Light Legends for Bud Light. They’ve done campaigns for Coke, Miller, Microsoft, ESPN – you name it. Coming off our conversation last week with Katie Welch about building a brand from the ground up using influencer marketing and potentially never hiring an ad agency, I wanted to get a view from the other side: how does a big ad agency work? Where does their money come from? So many of the big agencies are merging into what are called holding companies – why is Wieden still independent?

    Links:
    Bud Light puts creative account up for review after years with Wieden+Kennedy
    Mover Over Millennials -- Here Comes Gen Z
    How Selena Gomez's Rare Beauty Goes Viral, With CMO Katie Welch
    Mad Men (TV Series 2007-2015)

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/23081723

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott. It was edited by Callie Wright. And researched by Liz Lian.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino. Our Editorial Director is Brooke Minters. And our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

Kim Chuan ,

Love the interviews

Love Kara no nonsense approach.

Ashima Jain ,

Pretty solid

I love Kara’s work so liking this podcast wasn’t a surprise. My fave parts are especially when she has a “come to Jesus” moment in the middle of making a point

Top Podcasts In Business

CNA
NPR
Stanford GSB
Bloomberg
Steven Bartlett
The Motley Fool

You Might Also Like

The Verge
Recode & The Verge
New York Magazine
Recode
Vox Media Podcast Network
Daring Fireball / John Gruber

More by The Verge

The Verge
The Verge
The Verge
The Verge
The Verge
The Verge