42 episodes

A show about the science of our opinions, where they come from, and how they change. Hosted by social psychologist, Andy Luttrell.

Opinion Science Andy Luttrell

    • Science

A show about the science of our opinions, where they come from, and how they change. Hosted by social psychologist, Andy Luttrell.

    #37: Influence with Robert Cialdini

    #37: Influence with Robert Cialdini

    Dr. Robert Cialdini is an internationally recognized expert on the science of influence. His book Influence is one of the most influential business and psychology books of all time, selling over five-million copies worldwide. As a social psychologist, Cialdini has conducted foundational research on compliance, social norms, and helping behavior. But he is perhaps best known for boiling influence down to several key principles.
    He just released an updated and expanded edition of Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, and it’s well worth checking out! I was excited to talk with him about the new book, how he started studying influence, what made him write a book for the public at a time when academics stayed within their university walls, and how we can be effective communicators of social science findings.
     
    Things we mention in this episode:
    “Basking in reflected glory” (Cialdini et al., 1976)The “full cycle” approach to social psychology (Cialdini, 1980; Mortensen & Cialdini, 2010)Observing littering in a natural environment to study psychological questions (Cialdini & Baumann, 1981)Belonging to a group feels personal when your personal identity and group identity are fused (Swann & Buhrmester, 2015)People who are highly identified with a political party are more willing to hide evidence of tax fraud by a politician from their party (Ashokkumar, Galaif, & Swann, 2019)---------------

    Check out my new audio course on Knowable: "The Science of Persuasion."
    For a transcript of this episode, visit: http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/episode/influence-with-robert-cialdini/

    Learn more about Opinion Science at http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/ and follow @OpinionSciPod on Twitter.

    #36: Negotiation with Kwame Christian

    #36: Negotiation with Kwame Christian

    Kwame Christian is an attorney and negotiation expert. He's the director of the American Negotiation Institute where he and his team offer training and consultation for a variety of negotiation needs. He serves as a professor for Otterbein University's MBA program and Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law.

    In his podcast, Negotiate Anything, Kwame talks to experts in negotiation and persuasion to bring insights to a wide audience. In our conversation, he shares that the podcast has been downloaded over 3 million times!

    He is also the author of the book Finding Confidence in Conflict: How to Negotiate Anything and Live Your Best Life. In it, he shares how to overcome obstacles that get in the way of effective conversations. For a glimpse, check out his TEDx Dayton talk, "Finding Confidence in Conflict."

    You can find the negotiation guides Kwame mentions in this episode at the ANI website: https://americannegotiationinstitute.com/negotiation-guides/

    In our conversation, Kwame helps define what negotiation is, the reason why people struggle with it, and how we can use practice and psychology to get better at it.

    ---------------

    Check out my new audio course on Knowable: "The Science of Persuasion."


    For a transcript of this episode, visit: http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/episode/negotiation-with-kwame-christian/

    Learn more about Opinion Science at http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/ and follow @OpinionSciPod on Twitter.

    #35: Ambivalence with Iris Schneider

    #35: Ambivalence with Iris Schneider

    Dr. Iris Schneider studies the psychology of "ambivalence," which is when we can see both the pros and cons of something. Oftentimes research shows that ambivalence can be problematic, getting in the way of people being able to form a coherent view on something. However, Dr. Schneider suggests that there can be benefits to ambivalence if we're able to see it not as a challenge to overcome but a state to be embraced.
     
    Things we mentioned in this episode.
    For some good general resources for reading about the psychology of ambivalence, see: van Harreveld, Nohlen, & Schneider (2015); Schneider & Schwarz (2017)You can see people’s ambivalence by tracking the movement of their mouse as they choose whether something is “good” or “bad” (Schneider et al., 2015)Only a third of people’s everyday decisions are between two alternative options (Fischoff, 1991)Some people just tend to be more ambivalent than others, and it’s related to having less bias (Schneider et al., 2020; Simons et al., preprint)Lots of characteristics of people’s opinions can be considered either valuable or problematic, depending on your perspective (e.g., Rydell et al., 2006; Tormala et al., 2011)Identity-based motivations guide people’s interpretation of difficulty (e.g., Oyserman, 2015) 
    Check out my new audio course on Knowable: "The Science of Persuasion."
    For a transcript of this episode, visit:  http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/episode/ambivalence-with-iris-schneider/

    Learn more about Opinion Science at http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/ and follow @OpinionSciPod on Twitter.
     

    #34: Opinions of Ourselves with Ken DeMarree

    #34: Opinions of Ourselves with Ken DeMarree

    Ken DeMarree studies how opinion science applies how we see ourselves. He’s an associate professor of psychology at the University at Buffalo. In our conversation, we talk about how opinion science can be used to understand things like self-esteem, how people sometimes desire opinions they currently disagree with, and how some people just tend to be pretty confident in their views.
     
    Things we mention in this episode:
    California’s Self-Esteem Task Force (Guardian; NYT; The Cut)The psychology of strong opinions can help us understand how people see themselves (DeMarree et al., 2007)More “accessible” self-esteem is more durable and impactful (DeMarree et al., 2010)Seeing yourself in both positive and negative ways makes your self-esteem more susceptible to influence (DeMarree et al., 2011)When we want an opinion we don’t already have, it makes us conflicted (DeMarree et al., 2014; 2017)Some people just tend to be more confident in their views than others (DeMarree et al., 2020) 
    Check out my new audio course on Knowable: "The Science of Persuasion."
    For a transcript of this episode, visit: http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/episode/opinions-of-ourselves-with-ken-demarree/

    Learn more about Opinion Science at http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/ and follow @OpinionSciPod on Twitter.
     

    #33: Liking What Helps You with David Melnikoff

    #33: Liking What Helps You with David Melnikoff

    David Melnikoff studies how our goals affect how we feel about things. When stuff helps us reach a goal, we like it…even if it’s not the kind of thing we’d ordinarily like. In our conversation, we talk about what psychologists mean when they talk about...

    #32: Moralizing and Attention with Ana Gantman

    #32: Moralizing and Attention with Ana Gantman

    Dr. Ana Gantman studies how people process moral stuff. She’s an assistant professor at Brooklyn College, and she finds that our attention is often drawn more quickly to morally relevant stimuli in our environment. More recently, she’s been looking into how our moral judgments collide with bureaucracy and how we can use moral psychology to address issues surrounding consent and sexual assault. 
     
    Things we mention in this episode:
    The “moral pop-out” effect where moral stuff grabs our attention (Gantman & Van Bavel, 2014; Brady, Gantman, & Van Bavel, 2020)Moral pop-out seems to work like a motivational state because it goes away when needs for justice are satisfied (Gantman & Van Bavel, 2016)Using EEG to study the time course of moral perception (Gantman et al., 2020)The books The Utopia of Rules and B******t Jobs by David GraeberHow “phantom rules” can be selectively enforced when someone’s violated other social norms. Taking “consent pledges” before a party can get college students to moralize consent (The Daily Princetonian)

    Check out my new audio course on Knowable: "The Science of Persuasion."
    For a transcript of this episode, visit: http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/episode/moralizing-and-attention-with-ana-gantman/

    Learn more about Opinion Science at http://opinionsciencepodcast.com/ and follow @OpinionSciPod on Twitter.
     

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