321 episodes

A weekly discussion of current affairs in China with journalists, writers, academics, policy makers, business people and anyone with something compelling to say about the country that's reshaping the world.
A SupChina production, hosted by Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn.

Sinica Podcast SupChina

    • News
    • 4.8 • 9 Ratings

A weekly discussion of current affairs in China with journalists, writers, academics, policy makers, business people and anyone with something compelling to say about the country that's reshaping the world.
A SupChina production, hosted by Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn.

    Did tariffs make a difference in Trump’s trade war?

    Did tariffs make a difference in Trump’s trade war?

    This week on Sinica: Did the Trump-era tariffs have their intended effects? In other words, did they prompt companies to pull up stakes in China and re-shore jobs to the United States? Kaiser chats with two political scientists, Samantha Vortherms of UC Irvine and Jack Zhang, director of the University of Kansas’s Trade War Lab, about the paper they recently published with the intention of answering that question. The paper is called “Political Risk and Firm Exit: Evidence from the US-China Trade War.” They share their findings and explore the paper’s policy implications.




    4:16 – Sam and Jack offer their thoughts on U.S. Trade Representative Ambassador Katherine Tai’s recent speech on U.S.-China trade

    10:05 – Distinguishing between tariffs and other aspects of the trade war

    13:46 – Previously, on the U.S.-China Trade War: A brief recap of the trade war to date

    18:35 – The Foreign Invested Enterprises in China dataset

    23:14 – A summary of the paper’s findings: Tariffs did not increase the likelihood of firms exiting

    47:15 – What explains the relative reticence of affected firms when it comes to voicing opposition to tariffs?

    55:36 – What would you tell Katherine Tai and Gina Raimondo if they were your captive audience?




    A transcript of this interview is available on SupChina.com.




    Recommendations:

    Sam: The podcast Invisibilia, and specifically, a recent episode called “International Friend of Mystery.”

    Jack: The Masters of Chinese Economics and Political Affairs (MCEPA) degree program at UC San Diego's School of Global Policy and Strategy, and Amitav Ghosh’s River of Smoke (part of the Ibis series).

    Kaiser: A Song for Arbonne, a semi-historical fantasy novel by Guy Gavriel Kay.







    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    • 1 hr 18 min
    How Taiwan propelled China’s economic rise, with Shelley Rigger

    How Taiwan propelled China’s economic rise, with Shelley Rigger

    This week on Sinica, Kaiser chats with Shelley Rigger, Brown professor of political science at Davidson College and author of the new book The Tiger Leading the Dragon: How Taiwan Propelled China’s Economic Rise. Shelley recounts Taiwan’s rise as an export-led powerhouse and one of the Asian Tigers, and explains the wave of Taiwanese SMEs (small and medium enterprises) that transformed China into the factory to the world. She also opens a window on world-class Taiwanese companies like Foxconn, which employs some 15 million people in China and assembles some of Apple’s most iconic and consequential products, and TSMC, the world’s most valuable semiconductor company, and discusses how the island’s business relationship with China has complicated politics in Taiwan.




    4:34 - The story of Chen Tian-fu, Umbrella King of Taiwan

    9:27 - Explaining the psychological distance between Taiwanese and mainland Chinese

    19:08 - The conditions that created the Taiwan manufacturing boom

    33:42 - Why Taiwan manufacturing moved to the Mainland

    48:36 - The vulnerability of Taishang on the Chinese mainland

    53:03 - Moving up the value chain: Foxconn and TSMC

    1:07:31 - Beyond business: the impact of Taiwan on Chinese cultural life

    1:13:52 - Taiwan influence on Chinese institutions




    A transcript of this interview is available on SupChina.com




    Recommendations: 




    Shelley: Giri/Haji, a joint BBC-Japanese crime drama on Netflix.




    Kaiser: Jonathan Franzen’s new novel, Crossroads

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    • 1 hr 24 min
    Can China meet its ambitious emissions targets?

    Can China meet its ambitious emissions targets?

    This week on Sinica, Kaiser chats with Michael Davidson, a leading scholar on China’s environmental policy, who holds joint appointments at UC San Diego as an assistant professor at the School of Global Policy and Strategy and the Jacobs School of Engineering. Michael unpacks recent announcements out of Beijing, including Xí Jìnpíng’s 习近平 decision to cease all funding for coal-fired power plants outside of China, and explains the linkage between China’s push for non-fossil energy and the recent power shortages that have affected 20 provinces. He also explains China’s new emissions trading scheme, or ETS, and discusses what China still needs to do to meet the ambitious targets set by Xi Jinping last year: reaching peak carbon emissions by 2030, and achieving carbon neutrality by 2060. 

    3:26 – Xi Jinping’s announced end to funding for coal-fired generators outside China at UNGA

    12:00 – China’s recent power outages and their relationship to emissions reduction

    19:32 – The basics of China’s new emissions trading scheme

    38:37 – Coercive environmentalism, command-and-control, and market instruments

    47:15 – Can U.S.-China competition result in a “race to the top” in emissions reduction?

    54:24 – GHG reduction and the Red New Deal




    A transcript of this interview is available on SupChina.com.




    Recommendations:

    Michael: The Chair, a Netflix show starring Sandra Oh.

    Kaiser: Bewilderment, the new novel by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Overstory, Richard Powers




    Mentioned in the show: Valerie Karplus’s paper on China’s ETS; New York Times Magazine piece on The Many Saints of Newark, a Sopranos prequel.

    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    How the Chinese state handles labor unrest, with Manfred Elfstrom

    How the Chinese state handles labor unrest, with Manfred Elfstrom

    This week, Kaiser chats with Manfred Elfstrom, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics, Philosophy, and Political Science at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan. Manfred’s new book, Workers and Change in China: Resistance, Repression, Responsiveness, examines the state’s dynamic approach to handling labor actions — petitions, protests, strikes, and the like — and how it has blended compromise and coercion to address the demands of workers. The book makes an important contribution to a growing body of literature that seeks a deeper understanding of authoritarian governance in China and more generally among autocratic regimes. 

    3:27 – How the book’s argument fits into the broader literature on authoritarian governance

    9:32 – The book’s geographic focus: The Pearl River Delta and the Yangzi River Delta

    22:12 – Repression and responsiveness

    32:39 – Why repression and responsiveness undercut one another

    43:58 – The bureaucratic incentive to handle labor unrest well

    50:28 – Labor issues, common prosperity, and the “Red New Deal”

    55:58 – The Jasic protests and the crackdown on the Peking University Marxist study group

    A transcript of this interview is available on SupChina.com

    Recommendations:

    Manfred: Elizabeth Perry’s book Anyuan: Mining China’s Revolutionary Tradition; and James Green’s The Devil Is Here in These Hills: West Virginia’s Coal Miners and their Battle for Freedom.

    Kaiser: The Ezra Klein Show, and particularly the episode featuring Adam Tooze, “Economics Needs to Reckon with What it Doesn’t Know.” 







    See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    The benefits of engagement with China, defined: An audit of the S&ED

    The benefits of engagement with China, defined: An audit of the S&ED

    This week on the Sinica Podcast, Kaiser welcomes former Acting Assistant Secretary of State for East Asia and Pacific Affairs Susan Thornton to discuss a recently-published audit of the Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED), the annual set of high-level meetings with Chinese officials convened during the Obama administration by the U.S. Departments of State and Treasury.

    • 1 hr 32 min
    What's the deal with the Red New Deal?

    What's the deal with the Red New Deal?

    This week on Sinica, Kaiser and Jeremy welcome Lizzi Lee (李其 Lǐ Qi), SupChina contributor and host of the excellent Chinese-language YouTube channel Wall Street Today, and Jude Blanchette, Freeman Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), to talk about the spate of regulatory actions, new rules, and Party-led initiatives that, taken together, we at SupChina have started calling the “Red New Deal.”

    • 1 hr 17 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

carlathay ,

Outstanding podcasts

From policy to cooking to shady characters to tech to politics and everything in between. Love the dips and breath of the show.
10 out of 5 to Kaiser who is an amazing and erudite host.Jeremy‘s irreverence is great too!
Keep it up guys, you are doing amazing work!!!

Tom Wills - Singapore ,

The definitive China current affairs podcast

I've been following Sinica and been totally hooked on it since Kaiser Kuo got it going in (I think) 2010. Now co-hosted by Kaiser and Jeremy Goldkorn, the podcast is top notch and a must if you want an authentic window, in English, into what's going on with China (which everyone in the Western world should). Highly recommended.

Top Podcasts In News

You Might Also Like