1,085 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • Daily News
    • 4.8 • 116 Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The President and Pre-Emptive Pardons

    The President and Pre-Emptive Pardons

    The power to pardon criminals or commute their sentences is one of the most sacred and absolute a president has, and President Trump has already used it to rescue political allies and answer the pleas of celebrities.

    With his term coming to an end, the president has discussed granting three of his children, his son-in-law and personal lawyer pre-emptive pardons — a rarity in American history.  

    We look ahead to a potential wave of pardons and commutations — and explore who could benefit. 




    Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times. 




    We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey




    For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here




    Background reading: Speculation about pardon activity at the White House is churning furiously, underscoring how much the Trump administration has been dominated by investigations and criminal prosecutions of people in the president’s orbit.The president’s pardoning of Michael Flynn, a former national security adviser, signals the prospect of a wave of pardons and commutations in his final weeks in office. 


    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    • 25 min
    ‘Something Terrible Has Happened’

    ‘Something Terrible Has Happened’

    This episode contains descriptions of sexual assault.

    When the Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy this year, it created a final window for claims of sexual abuse against the organization’s leaders.

    Within nine months, nearly 100,000 victims filed suits — that far eclipses the number of sexual-abuse allegations that the Roman Catholic Church faced in the early 2000s.

    Today, we hear from one of the victims, Dave Henson, a 40-year-old naval officer who was sexually abused for five years by one of his scout troop’s leaders. Alcoholism and emotional trauma followed. Now, he has joined the ranks of thousands of people seeking redress.




    Guest: Mike Baker, Seattle bureau chief for The New York Times. 




    We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey




    For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here




    Background reading: The bankruptcy proceedings allowed the Boy Scouts organization to keep operating while it grapples with questions about the future of the century-old movement.The deluge of sex-abuse claims documents a decades-long accumulation of assaults at the hands of scout leaders across the nation who had been trusted as role models.


    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    • 35 min
    Biden’s Cabinet Picks, Part 2: Antony Blinken

    Biden’s Cabinet Picks, Part 2: Antony Blinken

    What kind of foreign policy is possible for the United States after four years of isolationism under President Trump?

    Antony Blinken, President-elect Joe Biden’s pick for secretary of state, has an interventionist streak, but some vestiges of Trump-era foreign policy will be hard to upend.

    If confirmed, Mr. Blinken faces the challenge of making the case at home that taking a fuller role abroad is important, while persuading international allies that the United States can be counted on.

    What course is he likely to steer through that narrow channel?

     

    Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times. 

    We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey




    For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here.




    Background reading: Mr. Blinken’s extensive foreign policy credentials are expected to help calm American diplomats and global leaders after four years of the Trump administration’s ricocheting strategies and nationalist swaggering.European allies of the United States have welcomed a president who doesn’t see them as rivals. But with the possibility of a Republican-controlled Senate, they are also wary.Mr. Biden wants to reactivate the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, but the killing of the top nuclear scientist in the Middle Eastern nation, which Tehran has blamed on Israel, could complicate that aim. 


    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

    • 27 min
    Biden’s Cabinet Picks, Part 1: Janet Yellen

    Biden’s Cabinet Picks, Part 1: Janet Yellen

    Janet Yellen, who is poised to become secretary of the Treasury, will immediately have her work cut out for her. The U.S. economy is in a precarious state and Congress is consumed by partisan politics.

    Ms. Yellen, however, is no stranger to crisis. She has already held the government’s other top economic jobs — including chairwoman of the Federal Reserve from 2014 to 2018, helping the country through the last major financial emergency.

    Now, facing another steep challenge, we look at the measures she might take to get the economy humming again.




    Guest: Jeanna Smialek, who covers the Federal Reserve and the economy for The New York Times. 




    We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey




    For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Read the latest edition here.




    Background reading: Ms. Yellen became an economist when few women entered the discipline. She is now set to become the first female Treasury secretary and one of the few people ever to have wielded economic power from the White House, the Federal Reserve and the president’s cabinet.While she may have excelled at some big jobs in the past, this role may be her hardest yet.


    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    • 27 min
    When and How You’ll Get a Vaccine

    When and How You’ll Get a Vaccine

    For Americans, months of collective isolation and fear could soon be winding down. A coronavirus vaccine may be just weeks away.

    According to Dr. Moncef Slaoui, head of Operation Warp Speed, the federal effort to accelerate vaccine development, the first Americans could receive the vaccine in mid-December.

    With the vaccine within reach, we turn to more logistical questions: Who will receive the shots first? Who will distribute them? And what could go wrong?




    Guest: Katie Thomas, who covers the drug industry for The New York Times.




    We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey




    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 




    Background reading: Promising clinical trials have buoyed hope that the end of the pandemic is in sight. But even if the vaccines are authorized, only a sliver of the American public will be able to get one by the end of the year.In mid-December, 6.4 million doses of Pfizer’s vaccine are expected to be shipped across the United States in an initial push.

    • 24 min
    A Day at the Food Pantry

    A Day at the Food Pantry

    On a day early this fall, Nikita Stewart, who covers social services for The New York Times, and the Daily producers Annie Brown and Stella Tan spent a day at Council of Peoples Organization, a food pantry in Brooklyn, speaking to its workers and clients.

    As with many other pantries in the city, it has seen its demand rocket during the pandemic as many New Yorkers face food shortages. And with the year drawing to a close, many of New York City’s pantries — often run with private money — face a funding crisis.

    Today, the story of one day in the operations of a New York food pantry. 




    Guest: Nikita Stewart, who covers social services for The New York Times; Annie Brown, a senior audio producer for The Times; and Stella Tan, an associate audio producer for The Times.  




    We want to hear from you. Fill out our survey about The Daily and other shows at: nytimes.com/thedailysurvey




    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 




    Background reading: Here are five key statistics that show how hunger is worsening in New York City.An estimated 1.5 million New Yorkers can’t afford food, and tens of thousands have shown up at the city’s food pantries since the pandemic began. But there is relief and hope when they are at home cooking.

    • 35 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
116 Ratings

116 Ratings

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