1,359 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.6 • 36 Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    Why Spending Too Little Could Backfire on Democrats

    Why Spending Too Little Could Backfire on Democrats

    When Democrats first set out to expand the social safety net, they envisioned a piece of legislation as transformational as what the party has achieved in the 1960s. In the process, they hoped that they’d win back the working-class voters the party had since lost.

    But now that they’re on the brink of reaching a deal, the question is whether the enormous cuts and compromises they’ve made will make it impossible to fulfill either ambition.

    Guest: Jonathan Weisman, a congressional correspondent for The Times.

    • 23 min
    A Threat to China’s Economy

    A Threat to China’s Economy

    Every once in a while a company grows so big and messy that governments fear what would happen to the broader economy if it were to fail. In China, Evergrande, a sprawling real estate developer, is that company.

    Evergrande has the distinction of being the world’s most debt-saddled property developer and has been on life support for months. A steady drumbeat of bad news in recent weeks has accelerated what many experts warn is inevitable: failure.

    But will the government let the company fail? And what would happen if it did?

    Guest: Alexandra Stevenson, a business correspondent based in Hong Kong covering Chinese corporate giants.

    • 30 min
    The Sunday Read: ‘Who Is the Bad Art Friend?’

    The Sunday Read: ‘Who Is the Bad Art Friend?’

    On June 24, 2015, Dawn Dorland, an essayist and aspiring novelist, did perhaps the kindest, most consequential thing she might ever do in her life. She donated one of her kidneys — and elected to do it in a slightly unusual and particularly altruistic way. As a so-called nondirected donation, her kidney was not meant for anyone in particular, but for a recipient who may otherwise have no other living donor.

    Several weeks before the surgery, Ms. Dorland decided to share her truth with others. She started a private Facebook group, inviting family and friends, including some fellow writers from GrubStreet, the Boston writing center where she had spent many years learning her craft.

    After her surgery, she posted something to her group: a heartfelt letter she’d written to the final recipient of the surgical chain, whoever they may be. Ms. Dorland noticed some people she’d invited into the group hadn’t seemed to react to any of her posts. On July 20, she wrote an email to one of them: a writer named Sonya Larson.

    A year later, Ms. Dorland learned that Ms. Larson had written a story about a woman who received a kidney. Ms. Larson told Ms. Dorland that it was “partially inspired” by how her imagination took off after learning of Ms. Dorland’s donation.

    Art often draws inspiration from life — but what happens when it’s your life?

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Qaddafi's Son is Alive, and He Wants to Take Back Libya

    Qaddafi's Son is Alive, and He Wants to Take Back Libya

    Before the Arab Spring, Seif al-Islam el-Qaddafi, the second son of the Libyan dictator Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, was establishing himself as a serious figure internationally. Then, the Arab Spring came to Libya.

    His father and brothers were killed and Seif himself was captured by rebels and taken to the western mountains of Libya.

    For years, rumors have surrounded the fate of Seif. Now he has re-emerged, touting political ambitions, but where has he been and what has he learned?

    Guest: Robert F. Worth, a contributor to The New York Times Magazine.

    • 34 min
    A Showdown in Chicago

    A Showdown in Chicago

    Chicago is in the midst of a crime wave — but there is also a question about whether police officers will show up for work.

    That’s because of a showdown between the mayor, Lori Lightfoot, and the police union over a coronavirus vaccine mandate.

    Some 30,000 city workers are subject to the mandate, but no group has expressed more discontent than the police.

    Guest: Julie Bosman, the Chicago bureau chief for The New York Times.

    • 28 min
    How a Single Senator Derailed Biden’s Climate Plan

    How a Single Senator Derailed Biden’s Climate Plan

    The Clean Electricity Program has been at the heart of President Biden’s climate agenda since he took office.

    But passage was always going to come down to a single senator: Joe Manchin of West Virginia.

    With Mr. Manchin’s support now extremely unlikely, where does that leave American climate policy?

    Guest: Coral Davenport, a correspondent covering energy and environmental policy for The New York Times.

    • 25 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
36 Ratings

36 Ratings

AishJesrani ,

Great!

Excellent to catch up with the daily news

escapistavoider ,

Great way to catch up with the news

I like having the opportunity to hear the news making process from the Times' reporters themselves. Their answers to the host's insightful questions let you see the context and take a glimpse into behind-the-scenes of a news story.

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