143 episodes

The Glossy Podcast is a weekly show discussing the impact of technology on the fashion and luxury industries with the people making change happen.

The Glossy Podcast Glossy

    • Business

The Glossy Podcast is a weekly show discussing the impact of technology on the fashion and luxury industries with the people making change happen.

    The Collected Group's James Miller: 'The U.S. department store model isn't going anywhere'

    The Collected Group's James Miller: 'The U.S. department store model isn't going anywhere'

    In a 35-minute conversation, James Miller brought up the concepts of speed and the need to keep up repeatedly.
    "If you stand still for too long, then you're just going to fall behind," he said on this week's Glossy Podcast.
    Miller would know about those things. He's the CEO of the Collected Group and just took on the added role of chief creative officer last week. That puts him in charge of the design as well as the business side of the clothing company's three brands: Joie, Equipment and Current/Elliott.
    Still, the group plays within the industry's established timelines: "We do 12 deliveries a year for each brand, and they're sold in seasons," Miller said. It was late January, and he was fresh from reviewing some of the deliveries that would go out this fall.
    Where the Collected Group does innovate is in its gender-fluid clothing, its emphasis on email marketing over social media and its sustainable practices that extend even to the clothes' labelling.

    • 39 min
    'The anti-fast fashion': Badgley Mischka president Christine Currence on not following every last trend

    'The anti-fast fashion': Badgley Mischka president Christine Currence on not following every last trend

    This week, we bring you a bonus, New York Fashion Week Edition of the Glossy Podcast, featuring Christine Currence, the president and owner of Badgley Mischka. Glossy Podcast host Jill Manoff sits down with Currence to discuss working with Rent the Runway, collaborating with a game app and making big adjustments this season, as Oscar Sunday overlapped with fashion week.

    • 34 min
    'I like to be scrappy': Argent founder Sali Christeson on easing into fundraising

    'I like to be scrappy': Argent founder Sali Christeson on easing into fundraising

    Sali Christeson has worked in industries from banking to big tech, but one thing has remained consistent about her day-to-day work life: "I've always been frustrated with shopping for workwear," she said on the Glossy Podcast.
    Christeson found the same pain point among her friends, which was further confirmed by a study she stumbled on in 2015. The study's authors measured "the impact of what someone wears on their bottom line over [their] lifetime," Christeson said, meaning that your look impacts your salary and job level. "It ends up being a 20% to 40% difference on your personal income. That was the catalyst for me. I read that, and I was like, 'OK, see ya, corporate world!'"
    Argent, the women's workwear company she went on to found, has offices in San Francisco and New York, and sells direct-to-consumer items ranging from blazers and pants to dresses.
    Since launch, the company has raised more than $4 million in Seed funding (with a Series A coming toward the end of the year, Christeson said), and has been worn by the likes of Hillary Clinton, Kamala Harris, Arianna Huffington, Gloria Steinem, Awkwafina and Amy Poehler.
    Christeson talked about the benefits of boot-strapping her business, the shifting consumer expectations brought about by Amazon and the joy of pockets.

    • 39 min
    Foot Locker's Mel Peralta: 'You want to be able to stop the scroll'

    Foot Locker's Mel Peralta: 'You want to be able to stop the scroll'

    Whatever the challenges of Mel Peralta's job, he has an honest customer keeping him on track.
    "Kids don't lie to you," Peralta said on the Glossy Podcast. "They'll let you know if they think your stuff is whack or your stuff is dope."
    Peralta is head of the new Foot Locker-owned brand incubator known as Greenhouse, which partners with both established labels in the sneaker game -- like Fila and K-Swiss -- and up-and-comers who might create the youth market's next cult product. Accordingly, the retailer changed its mission statement last year, saying it aimed "to inspire and empower youth culture."
    In Peralta's words, "Project Greenhouse is Foot Locker's incubator to find what's next." The company wants to do that by being involved with designs from square one. "Because we are a product creation hub -- and we're not just launching other people's things -- we have to be involved with every single project at the very beginning," Peralta said.
    The incubator's products are mostly sold via its own app, but they've also been sold at Foot Locker events, at boutiques and, one time, at a restaurant in Paris.
    Peralta talked about his longtime love for footwear, the passion of the sneakerhead community and the SpongeBob-branded shoe that's all the rage with kids.

    • 37 min
    'There's a return to retail': Michael Stars co-founder Suzanne Lerner on fashion's direction

    'There's a return to retail': Michael Stars co-founder Suzanne Lerner on fashion's direction

    Michael Stars wants to strike a balance between evolution and tradition.
    "You could call it quote-unquote sustainable, because my stuff doesn't get thrown away," said Suzanne Lerner, the company's co-founder and president, on the Glossy Podcast. "It doesn't end up in the landfill after that season that it was so trendy."
    As evergreen as its styles are, Michael Stars' revenue model is quickly changing.
    "Fifty percent of our business is specialty stores," Lerner said. "About 20% is our own e-commerce site, and the balance -- 30% -- is a mix of other [retailers'] e-commerce sites and subscription boxes," she said.
    Next, the company is looking to rebuild the brick-and-mortar retail network that it "successfully" pulled away from, Lerner said, starting with pop-ups.
    On the podcast, she talked about how the company has embraced direct-to-consumer model, how she met her husband-slash-business partner and why, when it comes to the company's political engagement, "We've got to be out there speaking."

    • 39 min
    'The second-hand market isn't going anywhere': Fashionphile founder Sarah Davis on the evolution of luxury resale

    'The second-hand market isn't going anywhere': Fashionphile founder Sarah Davis on the evolution of luxury resale

    Luxury brands typically want little to do with the second-hand market, but resale companies like Fashionphile are slowly winning them over.
    Founded in 1999 by Sarah Davis, the company invites customers to drop-off top-shelf accessories at one of its physical locations, where Fashionphile will buy them upfront. Trained Fashionphile employees verify the authenticity of the item before it's sold online, and the original owner gets a piece of the pie -- often a big one.
    A 70-30 split is common, with Fashionphile taking the smaller cut, Davis said. "But if the velocity of sale will be quick or if it's a super high-dollar item, or it's very popular, we'll give you much more," Davis said on this week's episode of the Glossy Podcast.
    Fashionphile limits its inventory to 51 luxury brands, many of which were once worried about resale tainting their brand image -- second-hand isn't exactly synonymous with luxury, after all. What's more, there's been concern from full-price retailers that the resale market will bite into their revenue.
    In the last few years, Davis said, several luxury companies have come around.
    "I think the brands have recognized [the resale market] isn't going anywhere. And so, more and more, they're thinking, 'What do we do about this?' It's led to some really amazing conversations we've been able to have with them. They're curious," Davis said.
    One thing that helped Fashionphile's image: a recent minority stake investment by Neiman Marcus, which now hosts some of Fashionphile's drop-off locations.
    More than 20 years after opening in Beverly Hills, Davis pointed to "a 50% growth rate year-over-year, consistently." The company's since opened locations elsewhere in California, as well as in New York and Texas.
    Davis talked about the importance of shipping products in unboxing video-friendly packaging, the trick to selling used shoes and the teenage boys who covet Hermès belts.

    • 41 min

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