393 episodes

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts  Ian Sample,  Hannah Devlin and  Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here:  theguardian.com/covid19questions  

Science Weekly The Guardian

    • Science

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts  Ian Sample,  Hannah Devlin and  Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here:  theguardian.com/covid19questions  

    Inside the world of wildlife trafficking (part two)

    Inside the world of wildlife trafficking (part two)

    In the second part of our look at wildlife crime, Phoebe Weston and Patrick Greenfield from the Guardian’s age of extinction project look at another victim: orchids. Why are they valued so highly? And how are they being protected? • Read more: ‘Orchidelirium’: how a modern-day flower madness is fuelling the illegal trade. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 22 min
    Inside the world of wildlife trafficking (part one)

    Inside the world of wildlife trafficking (part one)

    We often think of the illegal trade in wildlife as involving charismatic megafauna such as elephants and big cats. But some of the biggest victims are more inconspicuous. Phoebe Weston and Patrick Greenfield from the Guardian’s age of extinction project explore wildlife crime in a two part series Read more: Jellied, smoked, baked in pies – but can the UK stop eels sliding into extinction?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 17 min
    As indigenous languages die out, will we lose knowledge about plants?

    As indigenous languages die out, will we lose knowledge about plants?

    There are more than 7,000 languages spoken on Earth, but by the end of the century, 30% of these could be lost. This week, research warns that knowledge of medicinal plants is at risk of disappearing as human languages become extinct. Phoebe Weston speaks to Rodrigo Cámara Leret about the study, and the links between biological and cultural diversity. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 19 min
    Anna Ploszajski: crafting to better understand material science

    Anna Ploszajski: crafting to better understand material science

    Material science allows us to understand the objects around us mathematically, but there is no formula to describe the sophistication of a handcrafted teacup. Dr Anna Ploszajski is a materials scientist who has travelled all over the UK, meeting makers to better understand her craft and theirs. She spoke to Shivani Dave about what she discovered and documented in her new book, Handmade.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 17 min
    From the archive: Callum Roberts on a life spent diving in coral reefs

    From the archive: Callum Roberts on a life spent diving in coral reefs

    As temperatures soar in the UK, the Guardian’s Science Weekly team have decided to pull this episode out of the archive. Prof Callum Roberts is a British oceanographer, author and one of the world’s leading marine biologists. Sitting down with Ian Sample in 2019, he talks about his journey into exploring this marine habitat. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 22 min
    What can a wild night out teach us about ecosystem health?

    What can a wild night out teach us about ecosystem health?

    Moths, bats and owls are just some of the animals best observed at night, and they tell us a lot about the health of ecosystems. Age of Extinction reporter Phoebe Weston ventures into a dark wood with Chris Salisbury, author of Wild Nights Out, to see what she can learn by watching and listening to wildlife. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 21 min

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