243 episodes

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
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The Week in Art The Art Newspaper

    • Visual Arts

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Kusama x Louis Vuitton: art and luxury. Plus, Michael Rakowitz’s Tate/Iraq gift and photographer Rosy Martin

    Kusama x Louis Vuitton: art and luxury. Plus, Michael Rakowitz’s Tate/Iraq gift and photographer Rosy Martin

    This week: as robotic figures of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama appear in windows of Louis Vuitton stores in New York, London and Tokyo, Ben Luke talks to Federica Carlotto, a specialist in art and luxury, about the latest collaboration between Kusama and the LVMH brand. What does it tell us about what the former creative director of Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, called the “monumental marriage between art and commerce”? Also this week, the artist Michael Rakowitz hopes to give a public sculpture he made for Trafalgar Square in London to Tate Modern and an Iraqi institution. He explains how it prompted Iraq to request the return of one of the lamassu, the ancient Assyrian sculptures that inspired Rakowitz’s work, from the British Museum to its country of origin. And this episode’s Work of the Week is I didn’t put myself down for sainthood (2018), a piece made by Rosy Martin in collaboration with Verity Welstead. The photographic ensemble is in the opening displays of the new Centre of British Photography in London. We speak to James Hyman, the art dealer, collector and co-founder of the centre, about the work.
    You can hear our interview with Michael Rakowitz when he unveiled the sculpture in Trafalgar Square in the episode from 22 March 2018 and an in-depth conversation with Michael in the episode of the A brush with… podcast from 9 June 2021.
    Headstrong: Women and Empowerment, Centre for British Photography, London, until 23 April.

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    • 1 hr 1 min
    Van Gogh’s Sunflowers legal dispute. Plus, Singapore’s art scene and photographer Grace Lau

    Van Gogh’s Sunflowers legal dispute. Plus, Singapore’s art scene and photographer Grace Lau

    Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers in Tokyo are the subject of a legal claim in the US relating to Nazi loot. The Art Newspaper’s London correspondent and resident Van Gogh expert Martin Bailey tells us why Sunflowers (1888-89) is at the centre of the dispute, 35 years after it was sold for a record price at auction, and why the heirs of the German Jewish banker Paul von Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, who owned it until the 1930s, now value it at a staggering $250m. Our editor-at-large Georgina Adam has just returned from Singapore, where the first Art SG art fair took place last week. How successful was this new event in the art market calendar, and what does it tell us about Singapore’s ambitions to become an art hub? And this episode’s Work of the Week is Portraits in a Chinese Studio, a photographic work by the artist Grace Lau. In the project, which marks Chinese New Year, Lau is subverting the tradition of colonial 19th-century portrait studios in a shopping centre in Southampton on the south coast of the UK.
    Grace Lau: Portraits in a Chinese Studio, Marlands Shopping Centre, Southampton, UK, 21 January-12 February

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    • 40 min
    The art world in 2023: market predictions, big shows, museum openings

    The art world in 2023: market predictions, big shows, museum openings

    In the first episode of the year, we look ahead at the next 12 months. Anny Shaw, the acting art market editor at The Art Newspaper, peers into her crystal ball and tries to predict the fortunes of the art market this year. Then, Jane Morris, one of our editors-at-large, José da Silva, our exhibitions editor, and host Ben Luke select the museum projects, biennales and exhibitions that they are most looking forward to in 2023.
    Events discussed:
    The Grand Egyptian Museum: no confirmed opening date. https://www.theartnewspaper.com/keywords/grand-egyptian-museum
    The National Portrait Gallery reopens on 22 June. https://www.npg.org.uk/
    Factory International, Manchester, also opens in June. Yayoi Kusama’s You Me and the Balloons opens there on 29 June, as does the Manchester International Festival. https://factoryinternational.org/
    The Sharjah Biennial: Thinking Historically in the Present opens on 7 February. https://sharjahart.org/biennial-15
    The Gwangju Biennial: Soft and Weak Like Water opens on 7 April. https://www.gwangjubiennale.org/gb/intro.do
    Celebration Picasso 1973-2023 https://celebracionpicasso.es/en/calendario
    Vermeer opens at the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, on 10 February. https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/stories/themes/vermeer
    Manet/Degas opens at the at the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, on 28 March and then at the Metropolitan Museum, New York, on 24 September https://www.musee-orsay.fr/en/whats-on/exhibitions/manet-degas
    Juan de Pareja: Afro-Hispanic Painter, opens at the Met on 3 April https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2023/juan-de-pareja
    Simone Leigh opens at the ICA, Boston, on 6 April, then at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C., on 3 November before travelling to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Californian African American Museum in 2024 https://www.icaboston.org/exhibitions/simone-leigh
    Barkley Hendricks: Portraits at the Frick opens at Frick Madison, New York, on 21 September https://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/pdf/press/2022/Hendricks_Release_Final_07_13_22.pdf
    Alma Thomas: Composing Colour is at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, in D.C., from 15 September https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/alma-thomas
    The Culture: Hip Hop and Contemporary Art in the 21st Century opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art on 5 April and the Saint Louis Art Museum on 25 August https://artbma.org/about/press/release/baltimore-museum-of-art-and-saint-louis-art-museum-co-organize-monumental-exhibition-exploring-the-global-significance-and-impact-of-hip-hop
    Jaune Quick-to-See Smith opens at the Whitney Museum, New York, on 19 April https://whitney.org/exhibitions/jaune-quick-to-see-smith
    Remedios Varo: Science Fictions is at the Art Institute of Chicago from 29 July
    Hilma af Klint and Piet Mondrian: Forms of Life opens at Tate Modern in London on 20 April https://www.tate.org.uk/press/press-releases/hilma-af-klint-piet-mondrian-forms-of-life
    Marina Abramovic is at the Royal Academy in London from 23 September https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/marina-abramovic

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    • 1 hr 14 min
    2022’s biggest art stories—and what they mean

    2022’s biggest art stories—and what they mean

    It’s our final podcast of 2022 and so, as ever, we’re looking back at the worlds of art and heritage over the past 12 months. Ben Luke is joined by three members of The Art Newspaper team: Louisa Buck, contemporary art correspondent, Kabir Jhala, acting deputy art market editor, and Ben Sutton, editor in the Americas. Among much else, they discuss the effects of the war in Ukraine, Just Stop Oil’s activism, unionisation in US museums, the restitution of African and Native American (and Greek) objects, and the NFT crash. They also look at the big art shows and, finally, choose a work of the year.
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    • 1 hr 14 min
    Parthenon Marbles: breakthrough in sight? Plus, Afghan culture in crisis and Kiki Smith’s New York murals

    Parthenon Marbles: breakthrough in sight? Plus, Afghan culture in crisis and Kiki Smith’s New York murals

    This week: the Parthenon Marbles; it has emerged that George Osborne, the former UK chancellor and now chair of the trustees of the British Museum, has been holding talks with the Greek government about the ancient sculptures. So might this lead to a breakthrough in the long-running dispute over their ownership? Ben Luke speaks to Yannis Andritsopoulos, the reporter for the Greek newspaper Ta Nea who broke the story. In Afghanistan, it is more than a year since the Taliban reclaimed power—so what has become of the heritage projects and art community in the country, which is consumed by a devastating humanitarian crisis? We hear from Sarvy Geranpayeh, who has regularly reported from Afghanistan for The Art Newspaper, about art and archeology under the Taliban. And this episode’s Work of the Week is a group of five murals by the German-born US artist Kiki Smith. The works are about to be unveiled at Grand Central Madison, the new Long Island Rail Road terminal below Grand Central on Madison Avenue, Manhattan. Smith tells us about the origin and development of her series of vast mosaics.
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    • 47 min
    Feast and famine: Miami millions and UK arts cuts. Plus, Ukrainian Modernism in Madrid

    Feast and famine: Miami millions and UK arts cuts. Plus, Ukrainian Modernism in Madrid

    As Art Basel returns to Florida for the 20th anniversary of its Miami Beach art fair, Aimee Dawson, the acting digital editor at The Art Newspaper, talks to Anny Shaw, the acting art market editor, about the sales, news and talking points at the event that has become most synonymous with art-world excess. Meanwhile, after Arts Council England announced its funding allocation in November, arts organisations across the country, and especially in London, are reeling. Ben Luke talks to Jenni Lomax, the former director of the Camden Art Centre—the north London non-profit gallery whose funding has been cut by more than 30%. They discuss the effect of the cuts, and why the response from the visual arts community is relatively quiet compared to the uproar in the worlds of theatre and opera. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Oleksandr Bohomazov’s Sharpening the Saws (1927), a work from the National Art Museum of Ukraine in Kyiv. The painting is among a host of works moved from the war-torn country to the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum in Madrid for the exhibition In the Eye of the Storm: Modernism in Ukraine, 1900-1930s. Katia Denysova, the co-curator of the show, tells us about the picture, and the extraordinary journey it took from Kyiv to the Spanish capital.
    Art Basel in Miami Beach until 3 December.
    In the Eye of the Storm: Modernism in Ukraine, 1900-1930s, Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, Madrid, until 30 April 2023.

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    • 57 min

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