209 episodes

30 Minutes is a Tucson-based public affairs radio program featuring local, national and international guests and issues produced at 91.3 KXCI Community Radio. Since 2005, Producer/Host Amanda Shauger and other station contributors conduct interviews and record panel discussions on the arts, literature, social justice, on both timely and timeless topics.

30 Minutes Amanda Shauger

    • News

30 Minutes is a Tucson-based public affairs radio program featuring local, national and international guests and issues produced at 91.3 KXCI Community Radio. Since 2005, Producer/Host Amanda Shauger and other station contributors conduct interviews and record panel discussions on the arts, literature, social justice, on both timely and timeless topics.

    Alternative Migrant Trail 2020 Day 4 Todd Miller Empire of Borders

    Alternative Migrant Trail 2020 Day 4 Todd Miller Empire of Borders

    Today on 30 Minutes, our multipart series continues with excerpts from “In an Empire of Borders, Build Bridges, Not Walls with author and co-founder of the Migrant Trail, Todd Miller. Up first a member of the Migrant Trail Organizing Committee from New Mexico Jamie Ann Wilson introduces Todd Miller.
    Journalist and author Todd Miller has researched and written about border issues for more than 15 years. He resides in Tucson, Arizona, but also has spent many years living and working in Oaxaca, Mexico. His work has appeared in the New York Times, TomDispatch, The Nation, San Francisco Chronicle, In These Times, Guernica, and Al Jazeera English, among other places.
    Todd has authored four books: Build Bridges, Not Walls ( City Lights, 2021), Empire of Borders: The Expansion of the U.S. Border Around the World (Verso, 2019), Storming the Wall: Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security (City Lights, 2017), and Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Homeland Security (City Lights, 2014). Todd is a contributing editor on border and immigration issues for NACLA Report on the Americas and its column “Border Wars”. Todd was active in the planning of the very first Migrant Trail and has walked many times. His forthcoming book, Build Bridges, Not Walls, draws on his twenty years of activism and reporting, calling us to imagine a world without borders.
    Todd will share his insights on the global expansion of the U.S. border and its relation to policing climate-driven migration around the world.
    Since 2004, a group of committed people has coordinated an annual week-long, 75-mile walk from Sásabe, Sonora, Mexico to Tucson, Arizona to call for an end to migrant deaths along the U.S.-Mexico border and to stand in solidarity with victims of global migration. In May 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, participants were unable to physically unite to remember those who have died crossing
    In order to continue to raise awareness about migrant deaths and to help raise money for local border justice organizations, organizers launched an alternative Migrant Trail Walk experience to bring people together in a virtual environment. Proceeds benefitted: BorderLinks, the O’Odham Anti-Border Collective, Keep Tucson Together, and the No More Deaths Emergency COVID-19 Bond Fund. The Migrant Trail 2020 Alternative experience included a week of daily reflections, videos, podcasts, and featured speakers.
    This has been part 4 of a multipart series. You can learn more about The Migrant Trail on their website and on their Facebook group.
    Edited and produced by Amanda Shauger with audio provided by the Migrant Trail Organizing Committee.

    • 31 min
    Alternative Migrant Trail 2020 Day 2 Lupe Castillo Broadening our Borderlands History

    Alternative Migrant Trail 2020 Day 2 Lupe Castillo Broadening our Borderlands History

    The Migrant Trail 2020 Alternative experience included a week of daily reflections, videos, podcasts, and featured speakers. Part 2 of this series continues with excerpts from educator and activist Lupe Castillo’s presentation “Broadening Our Borderland History.” A member of the Migrant Trail Organizing Committee from Austin, Texas, lecturer Olivia Mena introduced Lupe Castillo.
    Lupe Castillo is a retired history professor at Pima Community College in Tucson as well as an activist in the Chicano civil rights movement. Born and raised in Tucson, Arizona, Lupe is a co-founder of the University of Arizona’s Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán (MEChA). In 1970, she helped organize Tucson residents to establish the El Rio Neighborhood Center and fought to build the Joaquin Murrieta Park on Tucson’s west side. At Pima Community College, she was one of the first professors to develop Chicano/a studies courses. She has encouraged students to see education as a tool that will enable positive change, and she has been a fierce advocate of the community for various social issues for more than 40 years. Today she continues to work with the Keep Tucson Together project and has been present for nearly every migrant trail.
    Lupe will invite us to see the borderlands from the perspectives of various indigenous, Mexican, and Mexican-American communities. These alternative ways of seeing and knowing the “southwestern United States” expose how colonial ideas and practices persist to this day while broadening our capacity to imagine alternatives for those who have long made the borderlands their home.
    Since 2004, a group of committed people has gathered to call for an end to migrant deaths along the U.S.-Mexico border.  Each May, participants have embarked on a week-long, 75-mile walk from Sásabe, Sonora, Mexico to Tucson, Arizona to call for an end to migrant deaths along the U.S.-Mexico border and to stand in solidarity with victims of global migration. This year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, participants were unable to physically unite to remember those who have died crossing.
    In order to continue to raise awareness about migrant deaths and to help raise money for local border justice organizations, organizers launched an alternative Migrant Trail Walk experience to bring people together in a virtual environment.  Proceeds benefitted: BorderLinks, the O’Odham Anti-Border Collective, Keep Tucson Together, and the No More Deaths Emergency COVID-19 Bond Fund.
    This has been part 2 of a multipart series. You can learn more about The Migrant Trail on their website and on their Facebook group.
    Edited and produced by Amanda Shauger with audio provided by the Migrant Trail Organizing Committee.

    • 30 min
    Celebration of Black Lives

    Celebration of Black Lives

    On Saturday, June 6, 2020, thousands of Tucsonans filled the University of Arizona Mall for a Celebration of Black Lives. The 3-hour event was organized by the Black Student Union and Black Lives Matters Tucson and featured speakers and performers. Today on 30 Minutes we’ll hear excerpts from a Celebration of Black Lives. Featured excerpts include Karlyn Bradley, Just Najima, Sonja Hamil, and Khalif.
    Live stream videos of the event are available on the Black Lives Matter Facebook Page.
    Recorded and produced by Amanda Shauger.

    • 38 min
    Alternative Migrant Trail 2020 Day 1 Kat Rodriguez Why We Walk

    Alternative Migrant Trail 2020 Day 1 Kat Rodriguez Why We Walk

    Since 2004, a group of committed people has gathered to call for an end to migrant deaths along the U.S.-Mexico border.  Each May, participants have embarked on a week-long, 75-mile walk from Sásabe, Sonora, Mexico to Tucson, Arizona to call for an end to migrant deaths along the U.S.-Mexico border and to stand in solidarity with victims of global migration. This year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, participants were unable to physically unite to remember those who have died crossing
    In order to continue to raise awareness about migrant deaths and to help raise money for local border justice organizations, organizers launched an alternative Migrant Trail Walk experience to bring people together in a virtual environment.  Proceeds benefitted: BorderLinks, the O’Odham Anti-Border Collective, Keep Tucson Together, and the No More Deaths Emergency COVID-19 Bond Fund.
    The Migrant Trail 2020 Alternative experience included a week of daily reflections, videos, podcasts, and featured speakers. Part 1 of this series begins with excerpts from Migrant Trail Organizing Committee Member Kat Rodriguez’s presentation “Why We Walk: History of Migrant Trail Walk.”
    This has been part 1 of a multipart series. You can learn more about The Migrant Trail on their website and on their Facebook group.
    Edited and produced by Amanda Shauger with audio provided by the Migrant Trail Organizing Committee.

    • 29 min
    Ernie & Joe: Crisis Cops- A Regional Response Part 2

    Ernie & Joe: Crisis Cops- A Regional Response Part 2

    In January 2020, The David & Lura Lovell Foundation convened a community screening of “Ernie & Joe: Crisis Cops,” an HBO documentary about police responses to mental-health calls at The Loft Cinema. Director Jenifer McShane follows police officers Ernie Stevens and Joe Smarro during their daily encounters with people in crisis as members of the San Antonio Police Department’s 10-person mental-health unit. Ernie & Joe is currently streaming on HBO.
    A panel discussion followed the screening which featured producer and director Jenifer McShane and the titular Mental Health Peace Officer Joe Smarro. Audience members were eager to learn more about the film and its subjects as well as what resources are available regionally.
    Local panelists included moderator Christina Rossetti, of Rossetti Consulting Group; Dr. Richard Rhoads, Chief Psychiatrist of the Banner-UMC Crisis Response Center; Judy Kowalick of the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Southern Arizona, or NAMI; Sabrina Taylor, the Phoenix Police Department’s Crisis Intervention Team Coordinator and board member of Crisis Intervention Team International; and Jason Winsky supervisor of the Tucson Police Department Mental Health Support Team.
    The Tucson-based David and Lura Lovell Foundation helped underwrite production of the documentary and sponsored the local screening. This is part 2 of a 2 part series.
    Recorded and produced by Amanda Shauger.

    • 29 min
    Ernie & Joe: Crisis Cops- A Regional Response Part 1

    Ernie & Joe: Crisis Cops- A Regional Response Part 1

    In January 2020, The David & Lura Lovell Foundation convened a community screening of “Ernie & Joe: Crisis Cops,” an HBO documentary about police responses to mental-health calls at The Loft Cinema. Director Jenifer McShane follows police officers Ernie Stevens and Joe Smarro during their daily encounters with people in crisis as members of the San Antonio Police Department’s 10-person mental-health unit. Ernie & Joe is currently streaming on HBO.
    A panel discussion followed the screening which featured producer and director Jenifer McShane and the titular Mental Health Peace Officer Joe Smarro. Audience members were eager to learn more about the film and its subjects as well as what resources are available regionally.
    Local panelists included moderator Christina Rossetti, of Rossetti Consulting Group; Dr. Richard Rhoads, Chief Psychiatrist of the Banner-UMC Crisis Response Center; Judy Kowalick of the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Southern Arizona, or NAMI; Sabrina Taylor, the Phoenix Police Department’s Crisis Intervention Team Coordinator and board member of Crisis Intervention Team International; and Jason Winsky supervisor of the Tucson Police Department Mental Health Support Team.
    The Tucson-based David and Lura Lovell Foundation helped underwrite production of the documentary and sponsored the local screening.
    Recorded and produced by Amanda Shauger.

    • 30 min

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