110 episodes

Public Lectures and Seminars from the Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford. The Oxford Martin School brings together the best minds from different fields to tackle the most pressing issues of the 21st century.

Oxford Martin School: Public Lectures and Seminars Oxford University

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 6 Ratings

Public Lectures and Seminars from the Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford. The Oxford Martin School brings together the best minds from different fields to tackle the most pressing issues of the 21st century.

    Panel Discussion 'The age of the strongman: populism and authoritarianism in global politics'

    Panel Discussion 'The age of the strongman: populism and authoritarianism in global politics'

    A discussion on leaders and populism with Lord Patten, Gideon Rachman, Margaret MacMillan and Ricardo Soares de Oliveira Since the beginning of the millennium, when Vladimir Putin took power in Russia, authoritarian leaders have come to dominate global politics.

    Self-styled strongmen have risen to power in Moscow, Beijing, Delhi, Brasilia, Budapest, Ankara, Riyadh and Washington. These leaders are nationalists and social conservatives, with little tolerance for minorities, dissent or the interests of foreigners. At home, they encourage a cult of personality and claim to stand up for ordinary people against globalist elites; abroad, they posture as the embodiments of their nations. And they are not just operating in authoritarian political systems but have begun to emerge in the heartlands of liberal democracy.

    This panel’s distinguished speakers will address the following questions: How and why did this new style of strongman leadership arrive? How likely is it to lead to global war or economic collapse? Most pressingly, we will be asking: are liberal societies, beset by internal turmoil and their own strongman dynamics, capable of checking and reversing this trend?

    This was a joint event with the Oxford Martin Programme on African Governance.

    • 1 hr 25 min
    The state of the African state: Where has it come from and where is it going

    The state of the African state: Where has it come from and where is it going

    Nick Westcott, Director of the Royal African Society, discusses the African State. African states have been in flux since long before colonial powers carved up the continent into bite-sized chunks at the end of the 19th century.

    In the 60 years since most became independent, new trends have emerged. Some have reflected history, both colonial and pre-colonial, from ethnic rivalries and migrating populations to authoritarian structures, extractive institutions and irrational borders.

    Others reflect new dynamics both local and global - economic imbalances, demographic dynamism, changing climate and a changing balance of global power. But in particular there is a shift in the ideological basis of the state: how do people view it, what do they expect and what do governments think they should do?

    This is a joint event with the Oxford Martin Programme on African Governance

    • 1 hr 18 min
    Book talk: 'Butler to the world: how Britain became the servant of tycoons, tax dodgers, kleptocrats and criminals'

    Book talk: 'Butler to the world: how Britain became the servant of tycoons, tax dodgers, kleptocrats and criminals'

    In this event chaired by Ricardo Soares de Oliveira, Oliver Bullough discusses his best selling and critically acclaimed book, 'Butler to the World: How Britain Became the Servant of Tycoons, Tax Dodgers, Kleptocrats and Criminals'. In Butler to the World, Bullough reveals how the UK has become a hospitable location for oligarchs and kleptocrats from all over the world - a place where they can hide their monies, build respectable reputations on the back of philanthropy and party donations, and influence those in power. From professional facilitators to politicians, Bullough’s book asks searing questions about today's political and economic life in the United Kingdom.

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Illicit finance and the role of professional enablers in the United Kingdom: are things finally changing?

    Illicit finance and the role of professional enablers in the United Kingdom: are things finally changing?

    MPs Andrew Mitchell and Margaret Hodge discuss illicit finance and their work on improving regulations. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and resulting sanctions regime has shed light on the United Kingdom’s harbouring of illicit wealth from around the world.

    It has also revealed the centrality of enablers in the legal and financial sectors in laundering oligarchs’ monies and reputations. As co-chairs of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Responsible Tax, Andrew Mitchell and Margaret Hodge have been at the forefront of the UK’s fight against dirty money, illicit finance and money laundering.

    In this event, Andrew Mitchell and Margaret Hodge will discuss with Ricardo Soares de Oliveira and John Heathershaw past attempts at curbing professional facilitators, the inadequacy of present regulations and the prospect of improvement through the upcoming Economic Crime Bill, among other ongoing efforts. Most pressingly, they will be asking: after a decade of signalling reform intent, is change really about to happen?

    • 1 hr 29 min
    Book talk: 'Storylistening: Narrative Evidence and Public Reasoning' with Claire Craig & Sarah Dillon

    Book talk: 'Storylistening: Narrative Evidence and Public Reasoning' with Claire Craig & Sarah Dillon

    Claire Craig and Sarah Dillon discuss their new book. There is an urgent need to take stories seriously in order to improve public reasoning.

    The challenges of using scientific evidence, of distinguishing news from fake news, and of acting well in anticipation of highly uncertain futures, are more visible now than ever before. Across all these areas of public reasoning, stories create profound new knowledge and so deserve to be taken seriously.

    The two authors, Claire Craig, Provost of The Queen’s College, and Sarah Dillon, Professor of Literature and the Public Humanities at the University of Cambridge, talk to Charles Godfray, Director of the Oxford Martin School, about their theory and practice of listening to narratives where decisions are strongly influenced by contentious knowledge and powerful imaginings in areas such as climate change, artificial intelligence, the economy, and nuclear weapons and power.

    • 1 hr
    Book Talk: 'Envisioning 2060: opportunities and risks for emerging markets'

    Book Talk: 'Envisioning 2060: opportunities and risks for emerging markets'

    The event launched a book by the Emerging Markets Forum (EMF), a Washington DC based not-for-profit think tank focused on emerging economies. The book takes a long-term perspective of emerging market economies through 2060. It highlights some of the fundamental and structural changes in the global economy accelerated by the pandemic as well as changes in geopolitics. It looks at the global megatrends, and the key issues such as climate change, rising inequality and inequities, fragility of international monetary system as well as rapid technological changes and their impact on the way we work that will heavily impact the future direction of most economies and societies. Finally, the volume highlights the fact that while many of the issues highlighted require joint actions at the global level, the current multilateral system is no longer geared to tackle them. It needs a major revamp as does the global economic governance.

    Harinder Kohli, Founding Director of EMF and primary editor of the book, Montek Singh Ahluwalia, former Deputy Chairman of the Planning Commission and G-20 Sherpa of India, and Sir Suma Chakrabarti, Chairman of ODI and former President of EBRD discuss the book, chaired by Ian Goldin.

    This talk is organised by the Oxford Martin School and the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Development.

    • 1 hr 28 min

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