9 episodes

The NDM recognises that public engagement is vital in order to educate, inform and build a relationship with the community. Our scientists are actively engaging in open discussion, and meeting people to debate, listen and learn.

NDM Public Engagement Oxford University

    • Education

The NDM recognises that public engagement is vital in order to educate, inform and build a relationship with the community. Our scientists are actively engaging in open discussion, and meeting people to debate, listen and learn.

    • video
    Variation across the human genome: a tricky balancing act in human health and disease

    Variation across the human genome: a tricky balancing act in human health and disease

    Genetic variation can have opposing effects on human disease, where the benefits of a protective variant against one disease can increase the risk of another. I provided four examples of the Yin/Yang of genetic variation in human health and disease:

    CCR5Δ32: This variant protects against HIV-1, but associates with risk of symptomatic West Nile Virus infection.
    HLA-B*57: this is an HLA class I allele of the highly polymorphic HLA-B gene that confers protection against HIV-1, but associates with risk of psoriasis and abacavir hypersensitivity.
    HLA-C expression levels: complex variation outside of the protein coding region of the HLA-C gene determines HLA-C expression levels, where high expression associates with protection against HIV-1, but it also confers risk of Crohn’s Disease and graft vs. host disease after transplantation.
    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors that confer activating states: These complex genotypes confer protection against KSHV infection, but among subjects with these genotypes who do become infected with KSHV, there is an increased risk of Kapok’s sarcoma.

    • 52 min
    • video
    Science in a crisis, fast-forwarding clinical research for Ebola

    Science in a crisis, fast-forwarding clinical research for Ebola

    Professor Peter Horby's research focuses on epidemic diseases such as Ebola and bird flu, and crosses the disciplines of basic science, medical science and public health. Professor Peter Horby, who was recently awarded a UK Government Ebola Medal for Service in West Africa for his role in fighting the 2015 Ebola outbreak, talks about the history and science of Ebola. This public lecture was given as part of Oxford Open Doors, on the 12th September 2015.

    • 23 min
    • video
    Outreach and Impact - Engaging with the community

    Outreach and Impact - Engaging with the community

    The Nuffield Department of Medicine is committed to the pursuit of academic excellence and the positive impact of its research on the health and wellbeing of the global community. Reaching out to the wider community, through public engagement, is an increasingly important component of medical research. In addition, the societal and economic impact of medical research is fast becoming an integral part of research assessment. NDM Strategic is dedicated to supporting its researchers in actively engaging with the public, as well as ensuring everyone in the Department is aware of the options available to them for translating research into impact.

    • 1 min
    • video
    Discovery of new medicines and the future of drug development

    Discovery of new medicines and the future of drug development

    How does medicine work? How are new drugs made? What role does the pharmaceutical industry play? Professors Stefan Knapp and Chas Bountra work in the field of drug discovery. They joined Science Oxford talks in spring 2013. Over the past 30 to 40 years there have been drastic changes in the way new medicines are developed. Before the 1970s drug development was based on phenotypic assays and 'accidental findings', with an approval process that would often take two to three years to complete. Scientists now have a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to disease development, allowing the selection of 'targets' - regulators which are dysfunctional in the disease - allowing scientists to develop new drugs, which inhibit these cellular targets. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 11 min
    • video
    Drug Discovery

    Drug Discovery

    How does medicine work? How are new drugs made? What role does the pharmaceutical industry play? Professors Stefan Knapp and Chas Bountra work in the field of drug discovery. They joined Science Oxford talks in spring 2013. Society is increasingly desperate for novel medicine. Most drugs used today were developed more than 40 years ago. With our ageing population, the incidence of diseases such as dementia, cardiovascular disease, and cancer will increase exponentially over the coming years. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 16 min
    • video
    Freeing Voices

    Freeing Voices

    Specific Language Impairment affects hundreds of thousands of British children, and causes them to have difficulties speaking and understanding language. Unlike common speech and language disorders, Specific Language Impairment (SLI), is the impairment of acquisition and language use, which is severe, persistent and often unexpected. SLI is hereditary and is typical of a complex genetic disorder, where certain combinations of functional variants result in less efficient biological processes. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 24 min

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