53 episodes

Welcome to ADHD money talk! The show helps dynamic but distracted ADHD brains take control over their money in order to stress less, live a more enriching life, and open up new possibilities. I am your humble and very ADHD host, Dave DeWitt.

ADHD Money Talk David DeWitt

    • Education
    • 4.6 • 29 Ratings

Welcome to ADHD money talk! The show helps dynamic but distracted ADHD brains take control over their money in order to stress less, live a more enriching life, and open up new possibilities. I am your humble and very ADHD host, Dave DeWitt.

    Challenge: Keep Your Monthly Food Spend Under $1,000

    Challenge: Keep Your Monthly Food Spend Under $1,000

    Are your weekends and weeknights spent devouring freshly prepared delights brought to you by your local food delivery services like DoorDash, GrubHub, or Uber Eats?

    Services like this are attractive to those of us with ADHD because it is a quick, easy decision and eliminates having to prepare a meal. The downside, of course, is the cost of these services.

    What is your food habit costing you?

    A quick rule of thumb is to spend no more than 15% of your take-home pay on food.


    On average, a single food delivery cost is between $40 to $60If you are ordering out an average of 4 times per week, you’re spending about $1,000 per month15% of the after-tax take-home pay of $5,000 would be $750 per month for foodThat $750 per month, if invested in the market over 20 years at an 8% return, would be $385,000If you are among the millions of people ordering out multiple times a week, you could be eating your financial future. But I would not point out this problem without providing a solution. Join me next week for steps you can take to stop reaching for your phone and get your spending habits under control.

    For more information, read https://www.dewittcm.com/adhdmoneytalkblog/how-adhd-adults-can-stop-eating-their-financial-futures

    Want to work with me?
    Check out my ADHD Planning & Coaching service.

    Help Me Out!
    If you enjoyed this podcast, the best way to help me is share it with a friend. Reviews and ratings are also appreciated:
    Click here to leave a review on Apple
    Click here to leave a review on my website
    Give me five stars on Spotify
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.

    DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session

    • 13 min
    Setting Financial Goals for 2023

    Setting Financial Goals for 2023

    As we begin looking ahead into the new year and what we want for our financial goals, it is important that you also reflect on how you did last year to ensure you do not repeat any undesirable spending behavior.

    Your order of operations

    Here is a quick recap of what your order of operations should be for 2023:


    Establish an emergency fund to cover, at a minimum, three to six months of expensesPay off any credit card debtBreak big goals down into smaller, more manageable piecesReview your cashflow and pull back where possibleTrack your spendingSet up a reverse budget methodology Pre-save for upcoming larger expensesIncrease your contribution to your 401(k)Start contributing to an IRA
    The Enactment of New Legislation - Secure Act 2.0

    The Secure Act 2.0 was passed on December 29, 2022, allowing employers and plan sponsors to match student loan payments with retirement contributions, like how employers currently match employee contributions to retirement funds like 401(k)s. Employees can set aside up to $2,500 of post-tax money in separate emergency savings accounts alongside their retirement accounts through their payroll deductions.

    Participants can withdraw up to $1,000 from their retirement savings per calendar year to cover emergency expenses without penalty. However, the borrower would have to replace those funds within three years before making another similar withdrawal.

    Establishing these goals and taking advantage of new legislation where applicable will help you make 2023 the year you successfully become a better financial version of yourself and achieve financial freedom!

    For more information, visit the show notes at https://www.adhdmoneytalk.com/s1e51

    Want to work with me?
    Check out my ADHD Planning & Coaching service.

    Help Me Out!
    If you enjoyed this podcast, the best way to help me is share it with a friend. Reviews and ratings are also appreciated:
    Click here to leave a review on Apple
    Click here to leave a review on my website
    Give me five stars on Spotify
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.

    DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session

    • 20 min
    Happiness Vs. Joy

    Happiness Vs. Joy

    The term happiness comes from the Old Norse term “happ,” meaning “luck” or “chance.” In the context of the Declaration of Independence, happiness was about an individual’s contribution to society rather than pursuits of self-gratification.

    Joy is a quality of the Soul. It is magnificent, divine, confirming, and otherworldly. Joy lives naturally and eternally within us all.

    Where is Your Focus?

    Money alone isn’t enough to make you happy. However, helping others can give you long-lasting joy and the feeling of true wealth. One mistake people make is to focus on making money instead of improving the quality of life for themselves and the people they care about.

    Here are a few ‘life checks’ you can use to see if there are opportunities you could alter your focus next year:

    1. Are you prioritizing the relationships with your family first? If not, what can you do to strengthen those bonds?
    2. Are you in the right job, and is it allowing you to create future financial security?
    3. In challenging times, do you invite negativity in or choose to focus on the positive?
    4. Instead of buying that ‘thing’ you think will bring you joy, would you achieve even greater joy by giving that money to someone else in greater need?

    Happiness and joy don’t have to be fleeting. Whether they come to us by luck or chance, we can choose to change our lives for the better, even when we feel out of control with our spending, emotions, or a lack of purpose in our lives.

    I hope you all take your money life seriously in 2023. Take a few moments to sit down, review your budget, values, and spending, and make plans you can stick to find that purpose, inner peace, and joy.

    Want to work with me?
    Check out my ADHD Planning & Coaching service.

    Help Me Out!
    If you enjoyed this podcast, the best way to help me is share it with a friend. Reviews and ratings are also appreciated:
    Click here to leave a review on Apple
    Click here to leave a review on my website
    Give me five stars on Spotify
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.

    DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session

    • 18 min
    Year-End ADHD Money Moves

    Year-End ADHD Money Moves

    Christmas shopping isn’t the only important item on your end-of-the-year list of things to do. There are several financial items you should also check to set yourself up for a great 2023 and potentially save money on taxes this year and get a bigger refund.

    Top Ten End-Of-Year Financial Checklist

    1. Make sure you have not been paying too little tax on your income this year using the IRS paycheck checkup tax withholding calculator
    2. If you have any money left over for the year, consider putting it into your 401(k) plan. It will help boost your savings for retirement and will lower your taxable income for this year
    3. Plan how you will spend your money for Christmas by creating a list and assigning a dollar amount so you don’t overspend
    4. Reflect upon your spending. How did you do in 2022? Could you have done better?
    5. Make some financial goals for 2023. Do you have any debt? If so, plan to pay it off before the end of next year. Also, create a goal for what you can save next year
    6. Use any FSA funds you may have. This is tax-free money that you will lose at the end of the year if you don’t use it
    7. If you have an HSA, consider maxing it out for this year to get those extra health savings
    8. If you’re a business owner, consider whether you qualify for the QBI deduction
    9. If you have business expenses, consider if it makes sense to defer or accelerate the costs to reduce your overall tax liability
    10. If you are in a low tax bracket this year and your income next year will push you into a higher one, consider setting up a Roth conversion while your tax rate is low and have that income grow tax-free

    Make Your End-of-Year Financial Review a Family Tradition

    Your year-end financial checklist should also include a status check with your family. Teaching your kids how to manage their money when their young will help them become financially successful adults.

    In this discussion, you should cover things such as:


    What was your budget for 2022, and did your family hold to it? What should your budget be for 2023.How much did you hope to save in 2022, and were you successful? How should that change next year?Was your family overpaying for certain expenses like utilities or cell phones? How can you trim those down next year?Were you paying off debt at the beginning of the year? Were you able to pay it off? What goal should you set for next year?Does your family have any large purchases on the horizon you need to plan for? Set a goal you can work toward together.You certainly don’t have to hit all of these goals by the end of the year. However, as you look at this list, try to find at least 2-3 things that you can commit to handling before December 31 and maybe another 2-3 that you can commit to at the start of next year.
     
    This isn’t about getting EVERYTHING right. It’s about making
    consistent forward progress one step at a time. What next step will you
    take?

    For links in the show notes, go to https://www.adhdmoneytalk.com/s1e49
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session

    • 15 min
    Rewiring our ADHD (my appearance on ADHD Rewired with Eric Tivers)

    Rewiring our ADHD (my appearance on ADHD Rewired with Eric Tivers)

    I was blessed and excited to be a guest on Eric Tivers’ ADHD Rewired podcast.

    In this episode, we discuss: 
    The shame we can feel around our financesHow to use our values to help guide our financial planningHow to get past the mental clutter when facing our financesWays to stay consistent with financial managementYou’ll also hear some strategies for tackling debt against spending, why “budget” is a “dirty’ word, the importance of filing your taxes on time,  and a glimpse into investing. 

    This interview was originally released at https://www.adhdrewired.com/438-adhd-money-talk-with-david-dewitt

    Want to work with me?
    Check out my ADHD Planning & Coaching service.

    Help Me Out!
    If you enjoyed this podcast, the best way to help me is share it with a friend. Reviews and ratings are also appreciated:
    Click here to leave a review on Apple
    Click here to leave a review on my website
    Give me five stars on Spotify
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.

    DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session

    • 46 min
    Lifestyle Creep! (...the silent inflation)

    Lifestyle Creep! (...the silent inflation)

    Lifestyle creep, or lifestyle inflation, is a real issue that can affect anyone - especially those of us with ADHD. When our income goes up, it's natural to want to spend more and enjoy life more. But if we're not careful, we can end up in a situation where we're making more money but have less saved. This can be a real problem when we hit a financial snag or want to retire. Suddenly, all those nice things we've been buying don't seem so worth it.

    In this episode, we'll explore the issue of lifestyle creep and how it can affect people with ADHD. We'll also look at some ways to prevent or undo it.

    Financial Stability Steps to follow:

    1) Track spending
    2) Have short-term goals
    3) Revisit values

    Track spending
    To track spending, use a physical notebook to write down your expenses each day or download an app to help keep track. Whichever method you choose, be sure to be consistent in order to get an accurate picture of where your money is going.

    In order to have short-term goals that will keep you motivated, it is helpful to tie them to a longer-term goal.

    For example, if you want to save up for a down payment on a house, you can break down your goal into smaller increments, such as saving $500 per month. This will make the goal feel more achievable and will help you stay on track.

    Finally, it’s important to revisit your values from time to time to make sure that your spending is aligned with what is important to you. If you find money is being spent on things that don't bring you true value, it may be time to cut back in order to save more.

    Have short-term goals
    Assuming the goal is to save more money and prevent lifestyle creep, one way to do this is to set up a savings system to automatically save a certain percentage of each paycheck into a savings account. This way, you are less likely to spend the money on unnecessary things and will have a cushion to fall back on in case of an emergency.

    Another way to prevent lifestyle creep is to track your spending and be aware of where your money is going. This can help identify any dangerous spending patterns and make adjustments accordingly.

    Finally, it is important to have short-term and long-term financial goals to keep you motivated and on track. Having specific goals to work towards will help you stay focused and avoid lifestyle creep.

    Revisit values
    If you're worried about lifestyle creep, one of the best things you can do is track spending. This will help you stay aware of where your money is going and help detect any dangerous or destructive spending patterns. You can also set up a savings system to automatically move savings towards your goals right off the top of your paychecks. This way, whatever hits your checking account is yours to spend.

    Finally, remember to revisit your values periodically. What do you want your money to do for you? Provide safety, stability, independence, freedom? Ease your day to day stress? Or do you want to get your Chick-fil-A four times a week? Make sure your spending is aligning with your values.

    Want to work with me?
    Check out my ADHD Planning & Coaching service.

    Help Me Out!
    If you enjoyed this podcast, the best way to help me is share it with a friend. Reviews and ratings are also appreciated:
    Click here to leave a review on Apple
    Click here to leave a review on my website
    Give me five stars on Spotify
    Helping ADHD'ers
    Helping ADHD'ers unleash their financial potential through planning and coaching.DeWittCM.com/adhd to book free discovery session

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Jett Avian ,

Terrific!

Talked with this guy during a consultation. Really down to Earth, funny, and super helpful! I love the podcast, and it encourages me to keep making strides in my financial journey as someone who manages their ADHD on a daily basis.

NannersYeah ,

Really Great Podcast Framing Finance for ADHDers

I’m learning a lot from this podcast about why I might be making the financial decisions that I’ve been making. The episodes provide good strategies for saving, budgeting, and investing without getting bored by the routine. Some real estate investing advice for ADHD brains would be great too!

Kaitmae ,

Love it!

Just started listening to this podcast and I’ve been really enjoying it so far. I look forward to see what kind of episodes are going to be coming up next and I’m excited to check out the archive of episodes I’ve missed :)

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