100 episodes

Agile Coaches' Corner shares practical concepts in an approachable way. It is for agile practitioners and business leaders seeking expert advice on improving the way they work to achieve their desired outcomes.

Agile Coaches' Corner Dan Neumann at AgileThought 

    • Business
    • 4.6 • 25 Ratings

Agile Coaches' Corner shares practical concepts in an approachable way. It is for agile practitioners and business leaders seeking expert advice on improving the way they work to achieve their desired outcomes.

    Professional Coaching and Agile Coaching: Differences and Similarities with Justin Thatil and Erica Menendez

    Professional Coaching and Agile Coaching: Differences and Similarities with Justin Thatil and Erica Menendez

    This week, Dan Neumann is joined by two of his colleagues, Erica Menendez and Justin Thatil, to talk about the intersection between Professional and Agile Coaching as well as their differences and similarities.
     
    In this episode, Justin shares his knowledge that comes from his own experience in the field of Professional Coaching that started 10 years ago. Dan, Erika, and Justin also explore the particularities of each role, the Agile and the Professional Coach, while exploring real-life scenarios and sharing powerful examples to illustrate both roles.
     
    Key Takeaways
    Professional Coaching: It is about guiding someone towards the results they are looking for by asking powerful questions. The coachee's agenda must be the single guiding light of the coaching relationship. The coach’s experience has to stay aside (this is one of the biggest differences between an Agile and a Professional Coach). The coachees need to be inspired to take the next step and be accountable for that move. The arc of a conversation has a beginning, a middle, and an end. The beginning is to identify who you are going to be coaching, and then identify the subject that will be addressed. After that, the situation must be examined and explored (this takes place in the middle of the conversation). Towards the end of the conversation, the coachee must commit to taking a step and become accountable for what is going to happen next. Agile Coaching: The coach’s agenda must be laid to guide the coachee to use Agile well. Facilitation comes along with a Scrum Master’s work. As an Agile Coach there are numerous stances that you can take: the consultant, coach, counselor, change agent, facilitator, trainer, lean leader, and mentor. An Agile Coach is an expert in Agility, not in the coachee’s domain.  
    Mentioned in this Episode:
    Coaching Agile Teams: A Companion for ScrumMasters, Agile Coaches, and Project Managers in Transition, by Lyssa Adkins
    What is an Agile Coach?
    Powerful Questions
    Want to Learn More or Get in Touch?
    Visit the website and catch up with all the episodes on AgileThought.com!
    Email your thoughts or suggestions to Podcast@AgileThought.com or Tweet @AgileThought using #AgileThoughtPodcast!

    • 25 min
    Continuous Learning: Professional Scrum Facilitation Skills Training with Patricia Kong

    Continuous Learning: Professional Scrum Facilitation Skills Training with Patricia Kong

    This week, Dan Neumann is joined by Patricia Kong in today’s episode. Patricia is the Product Owner, Enterprise Agility, and Learning Enablement for Scrum.Org.
     
    In this episode, Dan and Patricia are exploring a new training class Scrum is offering called Professional Scrum Facilitation Skills Training which is directed not just to Scrum Masters but for all levels including all leaders and Team members too.
     
    Key Takeaways
    What is Learning Enablement? It is the place to improve your profile and skills by learning from the experiences of the individuals who are actually doing the work. Learning enablement is directed at people who are really looking to develop people and Teams, specifically improving some of their own skills so they can help others. What is the Professional Scrum Facilitation Skills Training about? Professional Scrum Facilitation Skills is an interactive course designed to help Scrum practitioners develop a facilitator’s mindset and proficiency in facilitation skills, and learn when and how to select effective techniques for various circumstances. This class takes all real-life scenarios to help Scrum Masters facilitate the solutions that Teams need to get to agreements. This course includes the five principles for facilitation. The target of this course is for individuals on a Scrum Team but it could be great also for people in management roles. The training takes one day (equivalent to 8 hours) which includes some in-person and some virtual experiences. The matter of meetings... Most leaders think their meetings are great (when they are not). The purpose of the meeting needs to be clear, and the meeting should be avoided if the content could be in an email or a video. Facilitation skills are useful when nobody is providing feedback or they don’t even show up to the meeting. Conflict isn’t bad! If you are in a creative space, there will be conflict, since different members will come up with different ideas.  
    Mentioned in this Episode:
    Scrum.Org
    Professional Scrum Facilitation Skills™
     
    Want to Learn More or Get in Touch?
    Visit the website and catch up with all the episodes on AgileThought.com!
    Email your thoughts or suggestions to Podcast@AgileThought.com or Tweet @AgileThought using #AgileThoughtPodcast!

    • 32 min
    How Should a Scrum Master Enter a New Team with Justin Thatil and Erica Menendez

    How Should a Scrum Master Enter a New Team with Justin Thatil and Erica Menendez

    This week, Dan Neumann is joined by two of his colleagues Erica Menendez and Justin Thatil to today’s episode.
     
    This time, they are exploring the scenario when Scrum Masters enter a New Team, an event that Dan, Erica, and Justin know by experience. Listen to this episode to hear valuable real-life examples of how a Scrum Master can successfully transition into a new Team.
     
    Key Takeaways
    Duties that a Scrum Master needs to attend to when entering a new Team:
    A Scrum Master must establish his credibility, meet the Team, and create relationships with its members.
    Entering a new Team is different every time.
    A Scrum Master should observe and learn about the new Team he is joining, before attempting to start dictating. How much do Team members know about Scrum and Agile?
    Understand why the organization wants you on that Team.
    After knowing the Team, the Scrum Master needs to devise a plan to tackle the Team’s needs.
    Stay curious (rather than judgemental).
    What does improvement look like for the organization?
    A Scrum Master needs to explore communication styles within the new Team and identify the organization’s expectations not only about the Scrum Master’s performance but also about the Team.
    Is it helpful to have someone helping the Scrum Master transition to a new Team?
    Everyone is different, someone might notice aspects that another person didn’t.
    Sometimes it is better not to be influenced by someone else’s experiences or understanding of a particular member or a Team’s dynamics; a new approach brings a new perspective that can be beneficial for the Team.
    Mentioned in this Episode:
    The Scrum Fieldbook: A Master Class on Accelerating Performance, Getting Results, and Defining the Future, by J.J. Sutherland
    Man Enough: Undefining My Masculinity, by Justin Baldoni
    The Wayback Machine
     
    Want to Learn More or Get in Touch?
    Visit the website and catch up with all the episodes on AgileThought.com!
    Email your thoughts or suggestions to Podcast@AgileThought.com or Tweet @AgileThought using #AgileThoughtPodcast!

    • 32 min
    Helping an Organization Meet Its Needs with Dan Neumann

    Helping an Organization Meet Its Needs with Dan Neumann

    This week, Dan Neumann welcomes you to celebrate episode number 200! The Agile Coaches’ Corner Podcast began back in 2018 and the journey continues! During these years there were many guests, an increasing amount of listeners, and numerous Agile topics were explored. Thank you for being part of these first 200 shows!
     
    In this episode, Dan is exploring a typical situation: Trying to explain the benefits of the Agile ways to someone who is not immersed in the Agile field. Referring to the Agile principles, values, or even the Agile Manifesto won’t help stakeholders. Listen to this episode and learn to communicate how Agile can help an organization to meet its needs (without mentioning the word Agile!)
     
    Key Takeaways
    It can be challenging to communicate the benefits of using Agile to stakeholders not referring to Agile. If you are operating in an area of high uncertainty (or a complex environment) Scrum is the answer. The Scrum framework works to deliver increments every sprint, and by receiving feedback to make sure the product developed works and meets the definition of done. This helps to have more certainty and get closer to a solution for the customer. The Scrum Framework is a great assistance in reducing risks. When working with an organization in helping them to be more effective, you need to understand what “effective” looks like for them. First, you need to know what is valuable for the organization in order to help them along the journey of becoming more effective. Beginning with the end in mind helps you learn what is important and form tactics and strategies needed to assist an organization in a better way. Dan talks about the presentation he will do at The Agile + DevOps East Festival: It is OK to be unsafe: Scaling without using somebody else’s framework. Dan will talk in this presentation about what needs to be explored in order to help an organization meet its needs, and choose the strategies and tactics that make more sense in that specific context (Scrum is a great framework but it might not be the right for everyone).  
    Mentioned in this Episode:
    Listen to Agile Coaches’ Corner’s most popular show: What is Agile?
    No: The Only Negotiating System You Need for Work and Home, by Jim Camp
    Begin With the End in Mind: Habit 2 of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen Covey
    Find more about The Agile + DevOps East Festival
     
    Want to Learn More or Get in Touch?
    Visit the website and catch up with all the episodes on AgileThought.com!
    Email your thoughts or suggestions to Podcast@AgileThought.com or Tweet @AgileThought using #AgileThoughtPodcast!
     
    Contact Dan Neumann on Twitter.

    • 18 min
    Assorted Agile Questions with Michael Guiler

    Assorted Agile Questions with Michael Guiler

    This week, Dan Neumann welcomes his colleague Michael Guiler to today’s episode.
     
    In this episode, they will be answering questions regarding several Agile topics, such as leadership, effective communication, Team readiness, best practices, motivation, and transparency, among others. Join this fun and insightful conversation with Dan and Mike!
     
    Key Takeaways
    What is a good-to-go technique to help leadership transition from being tactical to being more servant leaders? Enable people who are closer to the work to make decisions in their field. Ask questions instead of giving directions. Rewire the communication path to be more practical and direct rather than following a hierarchy where there are chances of getting “lost in translation.” What does a Team that is ready look like? A Team that is ready is open to a conversation, they have an Agile Mindset where they know they need help, and they are open to discussing it. An Agile Mindset is keeping the curiosity high at all times and the readiness to run an experiment. What are best practices for? Best practices are just resources but certainly not “the way” of doing things correctly. Best practices are ways that have been used successfully in the past, and when used again they are not assuring their efficacy; a Team needs to test them to see if they apply to that particular situation. What does it take to help leadership transitioning to the model of motivation that Daniel H. Pink proposes in his book Drive? Daniel H. Pink proposes three pillars for motivation: autonomy, mastery, and purpose. He also addresses the distractions to motivation that organizations can fall into. Know your purpose at all times. Is there such a thing as “too much transparency”? There is no such thing as too much transparency; be open, get to know the people, share, and then you can moderate. Make sure that you are sharing information with people who can handle it.  
    Mentioned in this Episode:
    Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, by Daniel H. Pink
     
    Want to Learn More or Get in Touch?
    Visit the website and catch up with all the episodes on AgileThought.com!
    Email your thoughts or suggestions to Podcast@AgileThought.com or Tweet @AgileThought using #AgileThoughtPodcast!

    • 21 min
    Being Agile at Home with Phillip Lisenba

    Being Agile at Home with Phillip Lisenba

    This week, Dan Neumann is joined by Phillip Lisenba, who recently joined the Agile Thought Team.
     
    In this episode, Dan and Phillip are exploring how Agile ways could be applied to the home setting. The heart and soul of Agile can be used to achieve goals efficiently not only on a professional level but also at home in our personal lives. Listen to this episode to find many tips to reach your personal objectives with less effort!
     
    Key Takeaways
    First, make a list (without the things you do on daily basis). Include the small, medium, and bigger things that you need to do. Keep it simple! You can do it on paper or digitally, and get creative in finding something that works for you. Organize your tasks by priority, what creates more value for your family should go first. Everybody’s list is going to be different. Top ten tips to make your list: Create a list of things to do. Prioritize them. Break large projects into small tasks. Create a sense of urgency. Do something every day. Set a timebox for the work. Review the master list daily and reprioritize. Review your process and change as needed. Have fun with the work and process. Reward yourself. Eight Agile Tips to use at home: Tell yourself you can do hard things. Don't schedule regular daily activities unless you are creating a daily habit. After 30 days, once the daily habit is a habit, you can stop scheduling it. Take a break when frustration starts. Keep a record of what you have accomplished. Reward yourself for each day's accomplishments. Reward yourself for large accomplishments. Make the most important thing the most important thing! Remember to be flexible’ sometimes you have to pivot when challenges appear in order to keep moving forward. Consider changing your methods when they are no longer effective.  
    Mentioned in this Episode:
    The 5 Second Rule: Transform your Life, Work, and Confidence with Everyday Courage, by Mel Robbins
     
    Want to Learn More or Get in Touch?
    Visit the website and catch up with all the episodes on AgileThought.com!
    Email your thoughts or suggestions to Podcast@AgileThought.com or Tweet @AgileThought using #AgileThoughtPodcast!

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

VladMales ,

Great, engaging and practical content

Absolutely love the podcast. So much good, useful information any scrum master can apply to their team tomorrow. Nicely timeboxed conversation that stay on topic. Easy to follow along on your ride to work, or your morning/afternoon jog.
Keep it up!

AlbillaU ,

Great content

AgileThought podcasts are very relevant and educational within the Agile community

Brianjralph ,

Great, consistant podcast

Dan is very consistant at creating content that is always useful.

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