68 episodes

The Office of Extramural Research (OER) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) presents conversations with NIH staff members. Designed for investigators, fellows, students, research administrators, and others, we provide insights on grant topics from those who live and breathe the information. In mp3 and updated monthly.

All About Grants at NIH Office of Extramural Research

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 23 Ratings

The Office of Extramural Research (OER) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) presents conversations with NIH staff members. Designed for investigators, fellows, students, research administrators, and others, we provide insights on grant topics from those who live and breathe the information. In mp3 and updated monthly.

    Research Misconduct

    Research Misconduct

    That’s a bit…odd. That gel image looks photoshopped. The data looks to good to be true. And, wait a second, that figure appeared in another paper! These are examples of research misconduct. What do you do if you suspect research misconduct? Join us for this next installment of NIH’s All About Grants podcast with Dr. Christine Ring on addressing research misconduct. As an NIH Research Integrity Officer, she will share with us what is meant by fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism, how it affects the integrity of our supported research, what to do if you suspect research misconduct, how we work with the HHS Office of Research Integrity when responding to an allegation, and much more.

    • 16 min
    Am I Doing Human Subjects’ Research?

    Am I Doing Human Subjects’ Research?

    You have a promising research idea that may involve human participants to carry out the study. Do you know what to do next? Join us for the next NIH’s All About Grants podcast conversation about how you know you are doing human subjects’ research. Lyndi Lahl, R.N., a Human Subjects’ Officer with the NIH’s Office of Extramural Research, will help you understand what exactly is meant by “human subjects’ research,” its relation to the recently revised Common Rule, what research may be exempted, what institutions need to have in place, where to find important resources to help you going forward, and so much more.

    • 13 min
    Invention Reporting and Patent Protections for Grantees

    Invention Reporting and Patent Protections for Grantees

    So your supported research led to a nifty new invention, one that is patentable. What do you do next? Does NIH need to know about the invention resulting from the awarded grant? What patent protections and rights do you have? Ever heard of Bayh Dole or iEdison? In this next installment of the NIH’s All About Grants podcast series, we will get into the nuts and bolts of what NIH grantees should know about intellectual property, invention reporting, and patent protections. Scott Cooper, J.D., an Assistant Extramural Inventions Policy Officer with the NIH Office of Extramural Research, joins us to discuss these topics in more detail, provide some handy tips and best practices to keep in mind, shares resources available on our intellectual property webpage and iEdison FAQs, and reiterates that we are here to help you along the way.

    • 18 min
    All About Contracts

    All About Contracts

    Yes, we are talking about contracts in this next installment of the NIH’s All About Grants podcast series. Our guests will be George Kennedy and Brian O’Laughlin, who are acquisition staff from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and National Institute of Drug Abuse, respectively. The conversation will introduce you to the world of contracts at NIH, what they are, how they differ from grants, where to find them, what types of research are solicited, tidbits to focus on when developing a proposal, and more. Check out the System for Awards Management (SAM) to find more information on contract solicitations.

    • 15 min
    NIH’s Interest in Diversity and Supplement Programs

    NIH’s Interest in Diversity and Supplement Programs

    Avid NIH Open Mike blog readers will recall a post from a couple months ago contextualizing why NIH revised its definition of the economically disadvantaged category as a way to be more inclusive and diversify the biomedical workforce. In our next installment of the NIH’s All About Grants podcast series, we sit down with the Director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Dr. Jon Lorsch, to chat about diversity. The conversation weaves between NIH’s interest in diversifying the research workforce, to how this interest manifests in funding opportunities, who is eligible to apply, how diversity supplements can help someone’s career, and sheds light on the review process.

    • 11 min
    Notices of Special Interest (NOSIs)

    Notices of Special Interest (NOSIs)

    When dutifully scanning the weekly Table of Contents email for the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts every Friday afternoon, have you found yourself wondering where all the Notices of Special Interest (NOSI) came from? And, what is a NOSI anyways? Dr. Jodi Black, Deputy Director of NIH’s Office of Extramural Research, joins us in this next installment of the NIH’s All About Grants podcast series to break down NOSIs. We discuss what they are and why NIH is using them, what you should know about them when putting together an application, who you should go to for questions, and why it is so important to include that NOSI number in Box 4B of your application. Need a refresher on the alphabet soup of funding opportunity types touched on in the discussion? Check out our Understand Funding Opportunities page or listen to this classic 2011 All About Grants podcast to learn the difference between PAs, PARs, PASs, RFAs and parent announcements.

    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

Qianmege ,

Hope to have more

Great
Please to have more

jim Roe ,

Very helpful

Very informative podcast about the NIH GRANTS Process.

mrmantini ,

Feed is always wrong?

I feel like for the past quite a few episodes, the title hasn’t matched the content, and we’ve had several unexpected repeats. This used to be a great, helpful podcast but somebody is asleep at the wheel.

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