9 episodes

A historical, critical and sometimes whimsical look at the stories and characters from Anniston, the Model City of Alabama. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/phillip-tutor/support

Annie’s Town Phillip Tutor

    • History
    • 5.0, 2 Ratings

A historical, critical and sometimes whimsical look at the stories and characters from Anniston, the Model City of Alabama. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/phillip-tutor/support

    Remember when the Army practiced biological warfare on Anniston, Alabama?

    Remember when the Army practiced biological warfare on Anniston, Alabama?

    In 1952, the Army disregarded the advice of a top officer and decided to hold open-air biological warfare tests at Fort McClellan in Anniston, Alabama. In those tests the Army used two different bacterial agents that seem to have led to elevated rates of pneumonia cases among Anniston residents that winter. The bacterial agents were delivered in gaseous plumes and bacterial-filled bombs. But no one in the general public knew about it -- until a reporter for The Anniston Star newspaper used the Freedom of Information Act in 1981 to get declassified documents and publish these astonishing details.


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    • 16 min
    Prostitutes, whiskey and stolen cows: The early vice in Anniston, Alabama

    Prostitutes, whiskey and stolen cows: The early vice in Anniston, Alabama

    Sam Noble and Daniel Tyler, the founders of Anniston, Alabama, wanted to create a utopian factory city in the postwar New South that not only made them money but kept vice from creeping onto its streets. But they failed. As soon as the city was opened to the public in 1883, Anniston became known for its rampant whiskey reputation, and arrests of prostitutes and their clients at "bawdy houses" were common. So much for their Model City being free from vice.


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    • 17 min
    Why is the largest road in Anniston, Alabama, named after a Confederate Army chaplain?

    Why is the largest road in Anniston, Alabama, named after a Confederate Army chaplain?

    When the founding families of Anniston, Alabama, laid out the city's street grid, they named its largest road after C.T. Quintard, an Episcopal priest who served as a Confederate Army chaplain during the Civil War. But why? Quintard had no true connection to Alabama or Calhoun County -- other than, of course, his close relationship with a very important person in Anniston's past.


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    • 19 min
    Camp/Fort McClellan: Why was Anniston, Alabama's Army post named after a Union general?

    Camp/Fort McClellan: Why was Anniston, Alabama's Army post named after a Union general?

    If Anniston's politicians and newspaper had their way, the Army post created in 1917 during World War I wouldn't have been named after Union Gen. George B. McClellan of the Civil War. McClellan was a Philadelphian who graduated from West Point and had no connection to Alabama -- plus, he was a Yankee! And a New Jersey governor! And a failed presidential candidate! In this week's episode, Annie's Town takes a look at what names Annistonians preferred for their new Army post and the disappointment they felt when Little Mac was the Army's choice. 


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    • 25 min
    The Anniston Tragedy: An Alabama newspaper editor, an offended reader and 3 men shot in the newsroom

    The Anniston Tragedy: An Alabama newspaper editor, an offended reader and 3 men shot in the newsroom

    In 1888, William Edmonds, editor of The Hot Blast newspaper in Anniston, Alabama, began a scorched-earth editorial crusade against vice and bootlegging in the city. He didn't make friends with the police (who were corrupt) and the bootleggers (who didn't want their revenue curtailed by a journalist). That October, two men confronted Edmonds in his office and shot him and two other men, which led to arrests and a lengthy list of occurrences that didn't end until the 1890s out in Los Angeles. It remains one of the craziest stories about the city's many years of vigorous newspapering. 
    Annie's Town can be found on ITunes, Google Play, Anchor.fm, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Make sure you subscribe so you don't miss an episode. And be sure to leave a 5-star review if you like what you hear. 

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    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/phillip-tutor/support

    • 31 min
    The day the Freedom Riders came to Anniston, Alabama

    The day the Freedom Riders came to Anniston, Alabama

    The story of Anniston’s role in the Freedom Riders civil rights story is well known. But while racial violence was taking place in the city on Mother’s Day 1961, many Annistonians were oblivious and attended church, played golf and visited with their families.

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    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Sardis66 ,

Yes!

Good podcast

Kaye70 ,

Great podcast

It’s good to have one on Anniston.

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