50 episodes

This is a show about the connection between animals and humans in the past. Our
experts, Alex Fitzpatrick and Simona Falanga will guide you through the
interesting world of Zooarchaeology.

ArchaeoAnimals The Archaeology Podcast Network

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7 • 13 Ratings

This is a show about the connection between animals and humans in the past. Our
experts, Alex Fitzpatrick and Simona Falanga will guide you through the
interesting world of Zooarchaeology.

    Where in the World? Part Five: The Zooarchaeology of Oceania - Animals 49

    Where in the World? Part Five: The Zooarchaeology of Oceania - Animals 49

    Welcome to episode three of a miniseries focusing on the zooarchaeology of
    various world regions. Join us on a journey to Oceania as we learn about the
    natural history and anatomy of the most prominent wild and domesticated species
    found in the area. Tune in to learn more about creatures such as the cassowary,
    thylacine and platypus.
    Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr
    makes it really easy! Click this message for more info.
    [https://zen.ai/thearchaeologyshow]
    Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months
    with code ANIMALS. Click this message for more information.
    [https://zencastr.com/pricing?coupon=ANIMALS&fpr=w7bqv]



    Transcripts

    For rough transcripts of this episode go to
    https://www.archpodnet.com/animals/49



    Sources

    For a list of sources go to https://www.archpodnet.com/animals/49


    Contact

    * Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz
    [http://www.twitter.com/archaeologyfitz]
    * Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady [http://www.twitter.com/crazybonelady]
    * Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology [https://animalarchaeology.com/]
    * Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY



    Affiliates

    * Wildnote [http://www.wildnoteapp.com/]
    * TeePublic [https://www.teepublic.com/?ref_id=5724&ref_type=aff]
    * Timeular [https://timeular.com/ref/chriswebster/]
    * Motion [https://www.archpodnet.com/motion]

    • 52 min
    Where in the World? Part Four: The Zooarchaeology of Asia - Ep 48

    Where in the World? Part Four: The Zooarchaeology of Asia - Ep 48

    RE-POST: Sorry for the duplicate episode. Had to post a correction! Ignore if
    you've already heard Ep 48.

    Welcome to episode three of a miniseries focusing on the zooarchaeology of
    various world regions. This episode is centred around Asian zooarchaeology,
    focusing on the natural history and anatomy of the most prominent wild and
    domesticated species found throughout the continent. Tune in to learn how pandas
    were mistaken for tapirs, grunting oxen and oracle bones.
    Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr
    makes it really easy! Click this message for more info.
    [https://zen.ai/thearchaeologyshow]

    Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months
    with code ANIMALS. Click this message for more information.
    [https://zencastr.com/pricing?coupon=ANIMALS&fpr=w7bqv]

    • 55 min
    Where in the World? Part Three: The Zooarchaeology of the Americas - Ep 47

    Where in the World? Part Three: The Zooarchaeology of the Americas - Ep 47

    Welcome to episode three of a miniseries focusing on the zooarchaeology of
    various world regions. This episode is centered around American zooarchaeology,
    focusing on the natural history and anatomy of the most prominent wild and
    domesticated species found throughout North and South America. Tune in for
    beaver-pretenders, bison-cattle hybrids and even more moose/elk arguments!
    Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in
    archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot!
    [https://www.paleoimaging.com/about-the-paleoradiography-course]
    Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging [https://twitter.com/Paleoimaging]
    Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr
    makes it really easy! Click this message for more info.
    [https://zen.ai/thearchaeologyshow]
    Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months
    with code ANIMALS. Click this message for more information.
    [https://zencastr.com/pricing?coupon=ANIMALS&fpr=w7bqv]
    For rough transcripts of this episode go to
    https://www.archpodnet.com/animals/47

    Links

    * Anning, C. (2011) Inca success in Peruvian Andes 'thanks to llama dung'. BBC
    News.
    * Crader, D. C. (1997). Prehistoric use of beaver in coastal Maine (USA).
    Anthropozoologica, 25(26), 225-236.
    * - Halbert, N. et al. (2007). "Where the buffalo roam: The role of history and
    genetics in the conservation of bison on U.S. federal lands". Park Science.
    24 (2): 22–29.
    * Hirst, K.K. (2018) Llamas and Alpacas: The Domestication History of Camelids
    in South America. ThoughtCo.
    * Hubbard, T. (2014). Buffalo Genocide in Nineteenth-Century North America.
    Colonial genocide in indigenous North America, 292-305.
    * Petrigh, R. S., & Fugassa, M. H. (2013). Molecular identification of a
    Fuegian dog belonging to the Fagnano Regional Museum ethnographic collection,
    Tierra del Fuego. Quaternary International, 317, 14-18.
    * Miller, G. R. (2003). Food for the dead, tools for the afterlife:
    Zooarchaeology at Machu Picchu. In Burger, R. L., and Salazar, L. C. (eds.),
    The 1912 Yale Peruvian Scientific Expedition Collections from Machu Picchu:
    Human and Animal Remains.
    * Saunders, N. J. (1994). Predators of Culture: Jaguar Symbolism and
    Mesoamerican Elites. World Archaeology, 26(1), 104–117.
    * Speller, C. F. et al. (2010). "Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals
    complexity of indigenous North American Canham domestication". Proceedings of
    the National Academy of Sciences. 107 (7): 2807–2812.
    * Turner, B. L., and Armelagos, G. J. (2012). "Diet, residential origin, and
    pathology at Machu Picchu, Peru". American Journal of Physical Anthropology.
    149 (1): 71–83.
    * https://historicjamestowne.org/collections/artifacts/faunal-material/
    * https://blog.nature.org/science/2017/11/20/tracing-the-wild-origins-of-the-domestic-turkey/

    Contact

    * Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz
    [http://www.twitter.com/archaeologyfitz]
    * Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady [http://www.twitter.com/crazybonelady]
    * Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology [https://animalarchaeology.com/]
    * Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY

    Affiliates

    * Wildnote [http://www.wildnoteapp.com/]
    * Tee [https://www.teepublic.com/?ref_id=5724&ref_type=aff]

    • 1 hr
    Where in the World? Part Two: The Zooarchaeology of Africa - Ep 46

    Where in the World? Part Two: The Zooarchaeology of Africa - Ep 46

    Welcome to episode two of a miniseries focusing on the zooarchaeology of various
    world regions. This episode is centred around African zooarchaeology, focusing
    on the natural history and anatomy of the most prominent wild and domesticated
    species. Find out more about African Giant Rats, how loud Guinea fowls can be
    and what a zebrinny is.
    Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in
    archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot!
    [https://www.paleoimaging.com/about-the-paleoradiography-course]
    Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging [https://twitter.com/Paleoimaging]
    Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr
    makes it really easy! Click this message for more info.
    [https://zen.ai/thearchaeologyshow]
    Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months
    with code ANIMALS. Click this message for more information.
    [https://zencastr.com/pricing?coupon=ANIMALS&fpr=w7bqv]
    For rough transcripts of this episode go to www.archpodnet.com/animals/46
    [https://www.archpodnet.com/animals/46]

    Links

    * Beja-Pereira, A., et al. (2004). African origins of the domestic donkey.
    Science, 304, 1781.
    * Boeyens, J. C., & Van der Ryst, M. M. (2014). The cultural and symbolic
    significance of the African rhinoceros: a review of the traditional beliefs,
    perceptions and practices of agropastoralist societies in southern Africa.
    Southern African Humanities, 26(1), 21-55.
    * Marshall, F. (1989). Rethinking the role of Bos indicus in sub-Saharan
    Africa. Current Anthropology, 30(2), 235-240.
    * Parkinson, J. A. (2018). Revisiting the hunting-versus-scavenging debate at
    FLK Zinj: a GIS spatial analysis of bone surface modifications produced by
    hominins and carnivores in the FLK 22 assemblage, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania.
    Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 511, 29-51.
    * Pikirayi, I. (2018). The demise of Great Zimbabwe, AD 1420–1550: an
    environmental re-appraisal. In A Green and R Leech (eds) Cities in the World,
    1500-2000.Routledge, 31-47..
    * Potts, R. (1984). Home Bases and Early Hominids: Reevaluation of the fossil
    record at Olduvai Gorge suggests that the concentrations of bones and stone
    tools do not represent fully formed campsites but an antecedent to them.
    American Scientist, 72(4), 338-347.
    * Rossel, S. et al. (2008). Domestication of the donkey: Timing, processes, and
    indicators. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 105(10),
    3715-3720.
    * Shen, Q. et al. (2021). Genomic analyses unveil helmeted guinea fowl (Numida
    meleagris) domestication in West Africa. Genome biology and evolution, 13(6).
    * Stiner, M. C. (2004). Comparative ecology and taphonomy of spotted hyenas,
    humans, and wolves in Pleistocene Italy. Revue de Paléobiologie, 23(2),
    771-785.
    * Wylie, D. (2009). Elephant. Reaktion Books

    Contact

    * Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz
    [http://www.twitter.com/archaeologyfitz]
    * Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady [http://www.twitter.com/crazybonelady]
    * Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology [https://animalarchaeology.com/]
    * Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY

    Affiliates

    * Wildnote [http://www.wildnoteapp.com/]
    * TeePublic [https://www.teepublic.com/?ref_id=5724&ref_type=aff]
    * Timeular [https://timeular.com/ref/chriswebster/]
    * Motion [https://www.archpodnet.com/motion]

    • 59 min
    Where in the World? Part One: The Zooarchaeology of Europe - Ep 45

    Where in the World? Part One: The Zooarchaeology of Europe - Ep 45

    Welcome to episode one of a miniseries focusing on the zooarchaeology of various
    world regions. This episode is centred around European zooarchaeology, focusing
    on the natural history and anatomy of the most prominent wild and domesticated
    species. Tune in for curious animal introductions, waterfowl collections and
    musings on Pliny the Elder.
    Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in
    archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot!
    [https://www.paleoimaging.com/about-the-paleoradiography-course]
    Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging [https://twitter.com/Paleoimaging]
    Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months
    with code ANIMALS. Click this message for more information.
    [https://zencastr.com/pricing?coupon=ANIMALS&fpr=w7bqv]
    For rough transcripts of this episode go to www.archpodnet.com/animals/45
    [https://www.archpodnet.com/animals/45]

    Links

    * Bartosiewicz, L. (2005). Worked elk (Alces alces L. 1758) antler from Central
    Europe. From Hooves to Horns, from Mollusc to Mammoth—Manufacture and Use of
    Bone Artefacts from Prehistoric Times to the Present. Tallin: Tallinn Book
    Printers Ltd, 339-50.
    * O'Regan, H.J. (2018), The presence of the brown bear Ursus arctos in Holocene
    Britain: a review of the evidence. Mam Rev, 48: 229-244.
    https://doi.org/10.1111/mam.12127
    * Pate, F., Henneberg, R., & Henneberg, M. (2016). Stable carbon and nitrogen
    isotope evidence for dietary variability at ancient Pompeii, Italy.
    Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry, 16(1), 127-133.
    * - Richter, J. (2005). Selective hunting of pine marten, Martes martes, in
    Late Mesolithic Denmark. Journal of archaeological science, 32(8), 1223-1231.
    * Robinson, M.A., Domestic burnt offerings and sacrifices at Roman and
    Pre-Roman Pompeii, Italy. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 11, 93-9.
    (2002)
    * Wigh, B. (1998) Animal bones from the Viking town of Birka, Sweden. In E.
    Cameron (ed.) Leather and Fur: Aspects of Medieval Trade and Technology,
    81–90. London, Archetype Publications Ltd

    Contact

    * Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz
    [http://www.twitter.com/archaeologyfitz]
    * Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady [http://www.twitter.com/crazybonelady]
    * Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology [https://animalarchaeology.com/]
    * Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY

    Affiliates

    * Wildnote [http://www.wildnoteapp.com/]
    * TeePublic [https://www.teepublic.com/?ref_id=5724&ref_type=aff]
    * Timeular [https://timeular.com/ref/chriswebster/]

    • 1 hr
    Contemporary Zoorchaeology - What's in your Rubbish Bin? - Ep 44

    Contemporary Zoorchaeology - What's in your Rubbish Bin? - Ep 44

    On this episode of ArchaeoAnimals, Alex and Simona delve into contemporary
    archaeology. What can our household rubbish tell us about our food consumption
    habits? How do today's selection of species and butchering techniques compare to
    those of the past?
    Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in
    archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot!
    [https://www.paleoimaging.com/about-the-paleoradiography-course]

    Transcripts

    * Go to https://www.archpodnet.com/animals/44

    Resources

    * Fitzpatrick, A. (2018) "Death Positivity" for Pets: Are We Changing Our
    Attitudes Towards the Death of Animals? Animal Archaeology.
    [https://animalarchaeology.com/2018/11/05/death-positivity-for-pets-are-we-changing-our-attitudes-towards-the-death-of-animals/]
    * McCaferty, A. (2016) The Growing Demand for Pet Funerals. Insight Magazine.
    * Norton, E. (2020) UK Meat Consumption. Savills UK.
    [https://www.savills.co.uk/research_articles/229130/298951-0]
    * Stewart, C., Piernas, C., Cook, B., & Jebb, S. A. (2021). Trends in UK meat
    consumption: analysis of data from years 1–11 (2008–09 to 2018–19) of the
    National Diet and Nutrition Survey rolling programme. The Lancet Planetary
    Health, 5(10), e699-e708.
    * https://www.pfma.org.uk/pet-population-2021
    * https://yougov.co.uk/topics/food/articles-reports/2018/09/07/revealed-britains-ideal-sunday-roast

    Contact

    * Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz
    [http://www.twitter.com/archaeologyfitz]
    * Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady [http://www.twitter.com/crazybonelady]
    * Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology [https://animalarchaeology.com/]
    * Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY

    Affiliates

    * Wildnote [http://www.wildnoteapp.com/]
    * TeePublic [https://www.teepublic.com/?ref_id=5724&ref_type=aff]
    * Timeular [https://timeular.com/ref/chriswebster/]

    • 59 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

elsevier ,

Case studies is my favorite segament!

I no longer listen to podcast on Apple but I love this one so much I came back here to write this review! It is that great!

thatanthropodcast ,

Love from a fellow podcaster!!

Just found this podcast and I love it!! Keep up the great work ladies.

Xo Gabby (from That Anthro Podcast)

AnthropoLady ,

21 Response: The question of Lago in Lagomorphs

Lago comes from Ancient Greek for Hare, so lagomorph is a Hare Form, or form of a Hare (hares, rabbits, pikas) :) “Rude burrowing rabbits” is making me LOL, thanks for the great idea for a children’s book on archaeology! I’m on in! :) And on the association of lagomorphs with Easter, I think including the associations with spring time and fertility, it is interesting you bring up the practice of Lent. You’ve prompted me to think more on this and I have questions now to look into, re: possible Celtic pagan traditions or myths involving hares, later Irish folklife and superstition, later Irish Catholicism and Protestantism, then the colonial and migrant experience of Christians coming from these areas of Celtic origin to better understand the Easter hare in it’s socio-cultural and folklife contexts.

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