19 episodes

Art Scoping is a podcast featuring protagonists in the fields of art, architecture, design, publishing, art law, public policy, and culture generally. We’ll skip the elevator speeches and find out how arts leaders are coping with change, what keeps them up at night, and what gets them out of bed.

Art Scoping Maxwell L. Anderson

    • Visual Arts
    • 4.8, 13 Ratings

Art Scoping is a podcast featuring protagonists in the fields of art, architecture, design, publishing, art law, public policy, and culture generally. We’ll skip the elevator speeches and find out how arts leaders are coping with change, what keeps them up at night, and what gets them out of bed.

    Episode 18: Abbott Miller

    Episode 18: Abbott Miller

    Graphic identities abound in our media-saturated world—and in this episode we turn to a globally-renowned expert and practitioner to help us understand how he goes about inventing the typefaces, logos, and brand identities of leading art museums including the Guggenheim and the Whitney, the Barnes Foundation, and countless other cultural and commercial clients over many years. Abbott Miller has been a partner at Pentagram since 1999, and he has created multiple award-winning solutions worldwide. You’ll learn about the influences of his training at Cooper Union, the lasting impact of the Bauhaus in his field, the emotional underpinnings of the typefaces we take for granted, and his opinion of the graphic identities of the two competing presidential campaigns.

    Episode 17: Richard Olcott

    Episode 17: Richard Olcott

    Designing museums and concert halls demands a blend of experience, talent, and vision. Richard Olcott, Design Partner at Ennead Architects in New York City, brings the right blend and a sense of play to a serious profession. In this episode we learn about whether, in the face of the pandemic, clients are still lining up (they are), museums will return to business as usual (they won’t), and how the Spanish Flu of 1918 was central to the birth of modernism and the International Style of architecture (wait, what?). We discuss digital tools, the blight of ‘supertalls’ casting shadows across New York’s Central Park, indoor vertical gardens and other moves towards sustainability, whether ‘open office’ designs are doomed, and multiple other topics.

    Episode 16: Carol Mancusi-Ungaro

    Episode 16: Carol Mancusi-Ungaro

    What do James Brown’s album Sex Machine and the Renaissance sculptor Donatello have to do with protecting the art of our time? Find out in this wide-ranging conversation with Carol Mancusi-Ungaro, the Melva Bucksbaum Associate Director for Conservation and Research at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and for over a decade the Founding Director of the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art at the Harvard Art Museums. For nineteen years she served as Chief Conservator of The Menil Collection in Houston, Texas, where she founded the Artists Documentation Program, consisting of interviews with artists about the technical nature of their art. The consummate artist whisperer, she has pioneered new forms of conservation treatment, is an influential mentor for the field, and presides over the care of a globally renowned collection of modern and contemporary art.

    Episode 15: Alexander Bauer

    Episode 15: Alexander Bauer

    An archaeologist who today digs on the northern coast of Turkey at the site of Sinop, Prof. Alexander Bauer of Queens College-CUNY reflects on ancient examples of sculptural desecration, and paints a vivid picture of the daily life of a scholar in a sun-drenched archaeological site revealing 4,000 year-old finds with trowel and brush in hand. We hear about the mechanics of archaeology as so-called controlled destruction, leading-edge technology in service of uncovering the past, the promise of well-preserved shipwrecks 2,000 meters below the surface of the mysterious Black Sea, and George Orwell’s sage assessments of the power of history in determining the future. Close observers will detect evidence of his exuberant young sons Finnegan, Felix, and Alex in the background, and all listeners will be repaid for time spent listening to his candid assessment of the future of archaeology.

    Episode 14: Victoria S. Reed

    Episode 14: Victoria S. Reed

    Across the former Confederate states and around Europe, statues are being pulled down by cranes and crowds, as protests about symbols of racism and hate blanket the globe in the wake of George Floyd’s murder. For some context we turn to Dr. Victoria S. Reed, Sadler Curator for Provenance at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She is one of a handful of full-time curators in the U.S. tasked with researching the ownership history of objects offered to and in the museum’s collections—and is an expert in sorting out the evidence informing legal, ethical, and moral claims on artworks. We discuss collections built from colonial plunder abroad, Nazi loot, objects caught up in the illicit trade in the U.S., and what it will mean for museums to decolonize both their holdings and their attitudes.

    Episode 13: Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons

    Episode 13: Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons

    We turn to an artist for insight in the aftermath of George Floyd’s murder. Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons shares powerful observations and draws us into her unique worldview, leavened in her Nigerian roots, her years in Cuba, and her life today as Professor of Fine Arts and Cornelius Vanderbilt Endowed Chair of Fine Arts at Vanderbilt University. She has participated in the biennials of Venice, Dakar, and Johannesburg, in Documenta 14, and in multiple other major exhibitions worldwide, with works by her in over 30 museums, ranging from the Museum of Modern Art to London’s Victoria & Albert Museum.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

aof56 ,

Fantastic!!!

I heard about this podcast from a friend who said it was like eavesdropping on conversations between the most interesting people in the art world. It’s a perfect description; each episode is a lively discussion about how current events, from our political climate to the coronavirus, are impacting museums, galleries, artists and our culture with the people who are most deeply involved.

The podcast works brilliantly because Max Anderson is such a warm and engaging host. He always shares one or two specific things about the backgrounds of his intriguing guests before drawing them into questions that make their insights seem brilliant and intimate at the same time.

If you have any interest in the art world, you’ll enjoy this. If you’ve ever wanted to understand what art world insiders talk about when they’re together, you’ll never miss an episode and if you’ve ever dreamed of impressing your friends who know much more about art and culture than you do, recommend this terrific podcast to them!!

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