8 episodes

The english podcast of the Heinrich-Böll-Foundation.

Böll.Feature Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung

    • News

The english podcast of the Heinrich-Böll-Foundation.

    50 Years of ASEAN (3/3): Sustainable Transport and Emissions

    50 Years of ASEAN (3/3): Sustainable Transport and Emissions

    Everyone who has ever been to one of the Southeast Asian urban centers knows that traffic is a big problem. It is a problem for life quality of the city citizens as the endless traffic jams are health hazards and time consuming. Beyond this, transportation also cause emissions that contribute to climate change. However, solutions to free the streets from cars are yet to be implemented.

    By Johanna Son
    Johanna Son, a Filipino journalist/editor based in Bangkok for 17 years, follows a mix of regional issues, including ASEAN. She also works on programs around the capacity-building of journalists from Asia.

    Picture: Ines Meier/Lizenz: cc-by-nc-nd

    • 17 min
    50 Years of ASEAN (1/3): Taking stock of ASEAN´s vision of development

    50 Years of ASEAN (1/3): Taking stock of ASEAN´s vision of development

    Where are ecological concerns in the ASEAN development paradigm? They are stuck in the word “sustainable”. Despite the haze agreement and protocols on maritime policies, ASEAN has fallen short of reacting to climate change.

    Despite international commitments as the Paris Agreement, it does not manage to put words into regional action. As long as limits of growth are not integrated into the overall ASEAN vision, single projects like saving orang-utans will lead nowhere but deeper into the ecological crisis.

    By Johanna Son
    Johanna Son, a Filipino journalist/editor based in Bangkok for 17 years, follows a mix of regional issues, including ASEAN. She also works on programs around the capacity-building of journalists from Asia.

    Bild: Ines Meier/Lizenz: cc-by-nc-nd

    • 17 min
    50 Years of ASEAN (2/3): All clear on the Haze?

    50 Years of ASEAN (2/3): All clear on the Haze?

    The haze agreement is the first agreement in ASEAN on an explicit environmental issue. It has entered into force 2003 in order to manage forest fires and reduce environmental destruction as well as air pollution with joint regional efforts.

    However, in 2015 Singaporean citizens saw themselves confronted with a major haze, zero visibility and a thick smoke smell coming over from Indonesia. Today, the struggle between environmental, regional foreign and economic policy has still not been decided despite these immediate consequences.

    By Johanna Son
    Johanna Son, a Filipino journalist/editor based in Bangkok for 17 years, follows a mix of regional issues, including ASEAN. She also works on programs around the capacity-building of journalists from Asia.

    Bild: Ines Meier/Lizenz: cc-by-nc-nd

    • 16 min
    Tipping Point (5/5): The great transition - Alternative paths for a better and climate just future

    Tipping Point (5/5): The great transition - Alternative paths for a better and climate just future

    The Paris Agreement has set an ambitious goal to prevent global warming from spiraling out of control. But it has also set the stage for what will form the subject of numerous heated debates in the coming years: How do we tackle climate change? What is the framework that helps us decide which solution is viable? In this podcast series, we’ve looked at different strategies that have been proposed – some of which are speculative, risky, heavy with side-effects, others which look more attainable. In this last episode, we will zoom out and take a broader look at the transformation ahead. Climate change is a unique challenge. Each and every sector of the economy will have to change. Tackling the issue will require a fundamental shift in how we as humans interact with nature and our planet. Do we need a masterplan to get there? Maybe not. Because at this moment, many activists, scientists and entrepreneurs are already active, experimenting with models and ideas for a more sustainable and more equitable world. It’s a diverse set of approaches based on diverging cultural backgrounds that share acommon vision – to find ways for a livable and climate just future.

    Photo CC-0: Igor Ovsyannykov / Unsplash.com

    • 25 min
    Tipping Point (4/5): Precious Soils and Seeds - Industrial agriculture and climate smart farming

    Tipping Point (4/5): Precious Soils and Seeds - Industrial agriculture and climate smart farming

    The food that we eat plays a big role in the search for solutions to climate change. Agriculture is one of the major contributors of greenhouse gases. But the way we farm our land can also be a big part of the solution. In fact, certain kinds of soil are huge carbon sinks, which means that they take up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In this way, healthy soil can regulate the climate. The kinds of crops we plant play another crucial role. They can help us adapt to changes in the climate that we cannot prevent. If we farm diverse crops instead of monocultures, this makes us more resilient. In this episode, we discuss the impacts of industrial agriculture and alternatives concepts like agro-ecology with Teresa Anderson from Action Aid and Mariann Bassey from Friends of the Earth Nigeria. As it turns out, the way farmers nurture their crops can make a huge difference for people and the planet.

    Foto CC-0 Stephen Radford / Unsplash.com

    • 21 min
    Tipping Point (3/5): License to pollute - Carbon markets and the new economy of nature

    Tipping Point (3/5): License to pollute - Carbon markets and the new economy of nature

    We start to count as little kids. First our fingers, then our toys, and finally more grown-up things – calories, money, trophies. As a society, we now count our wealth and the CO2 that we emit. If you can quantify something by counting it, you can turn it into a market – right? That’s what countries around the world have tried by setting up emission trading systems. These new markets aim to put a price on carbon, to save emissions where it is cheapest and benefit the global climate. But the approach has failed so far. In the EU, the price for carbon has dropped to a low, so producers can easily continue polluting. And they are actually making huge profits from the permits they receive. Carbon credits are another way for polluters to buy themself out of responsibility. These offsets are often produced in poorer countries, in forests for example. By turning nature into a commodity, indigenous people are often forced to leave or change their traditional ways of life. In this episode, we discuss the side-effects of our new carbon economy with biologist Jutta Kill from Germany and Ivonne Yanez from Acción Ecológica in Ecuador.

    Photo: CC-0, pixabay.com

    • 25 min

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