373 episodes

Join expert voices from Barbell Logic and others from the world of strength for resources to help you get strong for life. Get coaching options and more educational content at barbell-logic.com.

Barbell Logic Barbell Logic

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.7 • 1.1K Ratings

Join expert voices from Barbell Logic and others from the world of strength for resources to help you get strong for life. Get coaching options and more educational content at barbell-logic.com.

    Tactile Cues for Correct Technique

    Tactile Cues for Correct Technique

    Matt & Niki explore tactile cues: different types, how & when to use them for in-person and online coaching.
    Oh, and how do you pronounce tactile? Is it like "tactical?"
    Tactile Cues vs Verbal & Visual Cues Tactile cues, as you may have guessed, involve you as the coach or an object touching the lifter.

    Visual cues show the lifter how to properly lift. Visual cues explain (hopefully clearly) how the client should move. Tactile cues use the sensation of touch to deliver information to the lifter.
     
    You as the coach may physically move the lifter into the correct position. This avoids the lifter having to understand your verbal or visual directions, and allows the lifter to feel proper form. An example is bringing the lifters elbows up & forward in the press set up.
     
    Similarly, you may pace your hand or finger on a body part you want the client to focus in on. For example, you may touch the lifters low back to get the lifter to extend her lumbar spine.
     
    Lastly, you may have an object impose a physical indicator that limits the range of motion. Examples of this include using a foam roller or 4x4 (often called terribly useful block of wood (TUBOW) to prevent knee slide in the squat or setting up a band so the lifter knows proper depth in the squat.
     
    Some carryover exists between verbal and tactile cues. You may give your lifter a verbal cue for her to feel a physical sensation. "Pressure on midfoot" is a great example where you're trying to create tactile feedback for the lifter through a verbal cue.
    Tactile Cue Challenges You need to build trust with your lifter, so ask if it's okay to touch the lifter to correct their technique, and touch them professionally. There are some situations where you may simply want to avoid touching lifters. Matt, for example, used to coach junior high females.
    What physical cues can you use in online coaching?
    Adjusting the lifter into correct technique is impossible. You may recommend the lifter gets an in-person session with a coach if you trust.
    There are ways, however, to bring attention to a body part or impose a physical limitation.
    The lifter or person close to the lifter may touch the lifter to bring attention to a body part. You don't have to be a coach to touch someone's low back or mid-sternum.
    Setting up a band or TUBOW, as well, can be done with online coaching.
    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE!

    Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh

    Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/


    Connect with the hosts
    Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show
    Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    • 30 min
    Making the Coaching Transition

    Making the Coaching Transition

    The coaching transition can be hard, as you have to budget time, money, or both with a steep learning curve & avoid potential pitfalls. Niki & CJ help you learn how to make the coaching transition to become a good coach.
    Also, learn the correct pronunciation of CJ's last name!
    Coaching Transition - Let's Go So, you want to be a coach!? Awesome. You'll have to move from your current non-coaching state & bring coaching into actuality.
    Of course, there's the leap of faith method, where you quit everything, metaphorically burn all your ships, and decide you'll be a coach one way or another.
    Let's try another path, a more deliberate path, where you learn from the wisdom and mistakes of others.
    Even if coaching become your primary means of income - you find yourself coaching at a big box gym or CrossFit gym, you have to ensure you coach, learn, and avoid burnout.
    If you're in this position, we can't recommend enough our (completely free) Coaching Kickstarter eBook. Check it out!
    Avoiding Pitfalls During Your Coaching Transition Whatever path you follow, you must coach. Coach your spouse, your friends, your mom, your kids. Just coach. You need the reps, just as someone who wants to lift needs to get started - even if they have a 1" bar with concrete plates, no lifting shoes or belt, and are searching correct form during the workout. Begin.
    You need a deliberate learning method. This not only includes the basic academic knowledge - anatomy, physiology, principles of programming, physics - but also a way to reflect on and learn from every coaching session.
    Just as a novice may not be all that strong but can enjoy the rapid growth of a linear progression, a beginner coach can similar improve quickly through deliberate practice.
    Ensure your business model is sustainable - and sustainability primarily means in terms of money and time.
    CJ, for example, knew he had four months of runway before he or his wife would have to begin to earn additional money outside coaching.
    Similarly, someone who keeps their main job and coaches in their free time will either need to put a time-limit on this practice or ensure that their combined main job and coaching job does not lead to burn out (too much time) or resentment (not charging clients enough).
    A major pitfall is going professional too early. Example include buying or renting a huge gym space, getting a professionally-designed website, or purchasing some administrative or backend support when you only have a couple paying clients.
    As you grow as a coach, a more professional website, a bigger space, and other marks of an established, professional coach will come - but don't do the coaching equivalent of buying a treadmill when you've never run a day in your life.
    Start today, keep learning, know your coaching VIP, and - seriously - download that Coaching Kickstarter eBook.
    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE!

    Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh

    Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/


    Connect with the hosts
    Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show
    Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    • 38 min
    Verbal Communication (Let's Talk)

    Verbal Communication (Let's Talk)

    Today, Matt & Niki delve into verbal communication - our primary means of communication as a coach, both in-person & online. While this may seem straightforward, many steps occur to correctly communicate to our clients & get them to move correctly.
    This begins & 3-part series of sorts where Matt & Niki will explore communication, beginning with verbal & touching on tactile & visual (and the differences between in-person and online).
    No video this week for YouTube viewers. We tried a new recording platform & lost the video. Bear with us while we try to improve our logistical & technological systems. Thanks!
    Verbal Communication on the Platform What has to occur for effective communication to occur on the platform?
    The coach must first see the lift, process that information, and compare what he sees to the model in his head (which may be imperfect). Following this, he must understand any deviations from the model, prioritize them, understand how to correct them, and deliver information to the lifter in the form of a cue (e.g. "knees out").
    That's a lot. But communication involves two people and is a two-way street.
    Hearing the cue, the lifter must then understand it (each word and the words together). The lifter takes that information and use it to attempt to change her movement in light of that new information. Then the lifter moves.
    The coach returns to the picture, and the process is repeated. Did the lifter fix the error (and potentially additional errors)? Was there an overcorrection? Did nothing change at all?
    Don't worry, though, while much is involved, we can simplify this process and accelerate your effectiveness as a coach.
    Teaching Versus Cueing Typically, a coach takes in information regarding new lifters, to understand those lifters' backgrounds. This helps the coach determine his approach with their first interaction.
    Coaches may perform a teaching progression, which both gets the lifter moving correctly while including certain words & phrases that will likely inform cues that the coach may use during the lifter's sets.
    It can be a good idea to walk lifters through the teaching progression, especially if you're a newer coach.
    For online coaching, teaching may involve some how to videos demonstrating proper form. Articles and podcasts that address lifting basics may begin to deepen the lifter's understanding.
    Understand that in order for a cue to be effective, it must be understood. Teaching should first focus on the "how"s. Teaching enables better understanding of cueing and coaching during the sets.
    As teaching progresses - as the lifter & coaching relationship lengthens and deepens - the focus of teaching moves from the "how"s to the "why"s, and this is often why good coaches are born as clients, because as they improve as lifters and learn the "why"s from a good coach, they consider coaching themselves.
    Practical & Effective Verbal Cues Let's move past the theoretical and come to the practical. What should you do on the platform? Some basic principles of good cueing can help steer you in the right direction. Cues should be:
    Brief - keep cues short *Confident - don't portray doubt *Loud - cues must be heard Clear - avoid big words Positive when appropriate - a "good" communicates that the lifter is correctly performing the movement *Note: loud & confident does not mean yelling (necessarily) - deliver appropriate cue for environment & lifter Cues must be understood, and more words means more words that can misunderstood or not heard. Keep cues short and use short words.
    If you're a new coach and not 100% sure about the cue, act like you are. Don't deliver a cue with doubt or like it's a question. Give the cue and evaluate and re-evaluate based on the lifter's movement.
    Lastly, seminars and powerlifting meets can skew cue volume. Cues must be heard, but they don't have to be yelled. Furthermore, increasing the volume tends to increase the confusion. If you deliver a cue, nothing changes, a

    • 40 min
    Nerding Out on Pain Science

    Nerding Out on Pain Science

    Nerd out on pain science, what it's like doing scientific research, getting papers published, and what we understand about pain interventions for humans. Jayson Ball, staff coach & PhD student, rejoins the podcast with CJ Gotcher.
    The Pain of Scientific Research What does science look like from the trenches of laboratories, where experiments are designed and executed, papers are submitted and defended, and knowledge is furthered?
    Jayson is mid-way through a PhD program. He has transitioned from spending most time in the classroom to now spending more time in the laboratory.
    Research takes much time, and some studies end with apparent dead ends (though knowledge & benefits to those involved can always be gleaned). He enjoys the process, and conducts as much research as possible to learn as much as possible.
    Nerding Out On Pain Science Jayson & his colleagues focus their research on rats. Rats enables some methods & interventions that are not possible with humans, but how much can be gleaned from experimenting with rats is always an issue.
    Rats love exercise. Put a running wheel in a container with a rat, and you will get high compliance. Put a treadmill in someone's house, and the same result does not follow.
    Pain and exercise research focuses on mechanisms, not interventions. Psychosocial interventions best serve humans (at least for now).
    Biological interventions (e.g. pain killers) come with serious side effects. Psychosocial interventions such as not catastrophizing  help people deal with pain and recover from injuries.
    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE!

    Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh

    Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/


    Connect with the hosts
    Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show
    Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    • 46 min
    End Your Cooking Rut to Overcome Food Boredom

    End Your Cooking Rut to Overcome Food Boredom

    How do you end your cooking rut? What do you do when your go-to foods bore you? Niki Sims & Nikki Burman have tips & tricks to re-energize your cooking & meal preparation, so you don't turn to unhealthy, convenience foods that take you away from your goals.
    End Your Cooking Rut It’s easy to grow sick of the same meals, get burnt out by cooking, meal preparation, grocery shopping, and all the other steps (including eating) that go into healthy, sustainable nutrition.
    Tackle this thorny issue from both sides: remember your goals & enliven the steps to crush your goals.
    Remember Your Goals – Know Your Why What are your nutrition goals and why do they matter to you? Reminding yourself of why you’re cooking, preparing meals, and eating healthy foods matters. Ruts happen. Don’t forget why you’re doing this in the first place.
    Nikki enjoys seeing her family happy & healthy. The physical manifestation of her goals is her family, so she not only looks toward her personal goals but her loved ones for motivation.
    Taking time to write your goals, post them, and investigate why they matter helps.
    Now, on to reenergizing meal preparation.
    Find New Recipes Finding new recipes can reenergize your nutrition, but doing this requires work (find the recipe, purchase the food, try it out, see if people like it).
    Unless you absolutely love trying new recipes, look for simpler recipes. Look at the ingredient list and the number of steps. Double-check that you’re comfortable with the cooking options (if it requires an air fryer and you don’t have one, move on).
    Beyond finding all new recipes, you can tweak go-to recipes to make them fresh and prevent boredom. Try cooking vegetables or meat, for example, with a different method (if you typically roast, try the air fryer or grill them).
    Change out meats and vegetables to find a different flavor profile. The basics of the recipe will remain, but the result will taste much different.
    Vary the spices and see what works and what you like.
    Make Cooking Fun If you’re cooking for your family, make it a family event. Have your family join you, so you don’t feel like you’re sacrificing family time for food time. This is also a great way to teach your family how to cook and what is involved in making healthy food.
    If you’re meal prepping for yourself, listen to music or your favorite podcast. Have it be – like training time – a time away from work and that is all about you and moving toward your goals.
    Preparation & Planning Have healthy meats & veggies frozen & on-hand. Maintain a well-stocked spice cabinet. Keep necessary & go-to sauces in your refrigerator.
    If you made too much of something, freeze part of it so you have a ready-to-go meal.
    Schedule your grocery shopping. This might mean having it delivered to your house, delivered to the car, or going in yourself, but ensure you have your grocery list complete & ensure the time works for you and your family.
    Don’t Fear Failure You might make something that doesn’t go over well. That’s okay. You’ll make more food that is tasty and healthy, and you’ll occasionally find a new favorite dish that you’ll want to make for and share with others.
    Experiment and try new things. If you’re sick of eggs, try overnight oats, recipes with greek yogurt, or cottage cheese and fruit.
    Try breakfast for dinner (or dinner for breakfast).
    Ultimately, if you’re dreading eating your prepared food, lower compliance is likely to arise. Lower compliance means moving away from your goals. Notice this early and try some new recipes or new ways of cooking now before you’re noticing metrics shifting in an undesired direction.
    Let us know if you have some other ideas to end your cooking rut and reenergize meal preparation!
    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE!

    Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.

    • 32 min
    Are there too many coaches?

    Are there too many coaches?

    Are there too many coaches!? Learn how to stand out, find clients & provide value as a coach in a seemingly flooded coaching market.
    The Flooded Fitness Market Are there too many coaches!? Learn how to stand out, find clients & provide value as a coach in a seemingly flooded coaching market. With social media & the internet, it's easy to be overwhelmed by the quantity of personal trainers, content creators, and coaches trying to find a piece of the fitness market. Niki & CJ can help.
    Think about your Values, Identities, & Priorities (VIP) & consider the market. Ideally, these two circles are aligned perfectly. They won't be, and you're not looking to coach everyone in the fitness market.
    You are not in the same pool as the expert, online coach who has been doing this for decades. While you may look up to this coach and learn from him or her, comparing yourself to him or her is ultimately counterproductive. Plus, these people didn't begin with huge social media followings or large online coaching companies.
    Finding Clients as a Coach What comparative advantage do you have over a Matt Reynolds, Louie Simmons, or whatever coach you look up to? You know your co-workers, friends, and family and can help them meet their goals with a relatively low knowledge level and for much cheaper than a professional barbell coach.
    The people around you should know that you lift and coach. Like any other hobby, talk about it in person and on social media. Start coaching friends, family, & co-workers. Do it now. Start coaching.
    Don't worry about finding a niche. Don't worry about marketing, having a website, starting a podcast, getting a certification, or getting articles published. These are all great. They don't help you coach.
    Providing Value as a Coach It doesn't take much experience or knowledge to be able to help those around you. Having some teaching progressions, knowing some cues, and understanding the basics of programming a novice means you can people meet their goals.
    It is not a big gap between posting videos of your friends and family hitting PRs on social media and posting videos of your clients hitting personal bests on social media.
    You don't need to know how to program DUP or Conjugate programming to help someone get stronger. You don't need to have 10k followers on Instagram to double someone's squat. You don't have to have a personal training certification to teach someone how to deadlift.
    Find Clients & Provide Value as a Coach The low barrier to entry should not discourage you but encourage you. To find clients & provide value as a coach does not require intensive study and years of experience. You can start now.
    This also means there are many bad coaches and personal trainers out there. You can quickly surpass them by acting professionally now, by developing and maintaining an academy study habit, and by coaching now.
    Certifications, content creation, and finding social media followers are great. Do these along the way. Like you shouldn't feel like a failure because you can't squat 315 on day 1, don't feel bad that as a newbie coach your skills and knowledge reflect that.
    Just as two months on a novice linear progression can make a big different, two months of study, coaching, and posting on social media can make a big difference.
    Accomplishing your goals as a professional barbell coach requires consistency over a long period of time. Start now - there is no better day or time to begin.
    GET STARTED with one-on-one online coaching FOR FREE!

    Get your FIRST MONTH FREE on all strength and nutrition coaching plans.  No discount code needed and includes a 10-day, no obligation trial.  https://bit.ly/2MKeOoh

    Special offers from BLOC and our partners:  https://barbell-logic.com/offers/


    Connect with the hosts
    Matt on Instagram Niki on Instagram Connect with the show
    Barbell Logic on Instagram Podcast Webpage Barbell Logic on Facebook Or email podcast@barbell-logic.com

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

ETrain7273 ,

Great Content

Fantastic discussions on barbell training, with some great discussions about life. I can't recommend this podcast enough.

TKESmitty ,

Master’s Powerlifter

Im a 59 year old male. I’m not new to fitness or weightlifting but I am new to competitive powerlifting. I’m learning a lot from this podcast.

Darrinbru ,

Ran its course

Great podcast. Like other “ the Chinese Aids comment I thought was distasteful, but candidly the general arrogance and I’m smart and have all the answers attitude eventually turned me off of the podcast. However, if you are looking to learn how to get strong, listen to the early episodes and they will put you on track.

Top Podcasts In Health & Fitness

Scicomm Media
Jay Shetty
Lewis Howes
Aubrey Gordon & Michael Hobbes
Dr. Mark Hyman
Slumber Studios

You Might Also Like

Mark Rippetoe
Barbell Medicine
Eric Helms & Omar Isuf
elitefts.com
Barbell Shrugged
Dr. Aaron Horschig