11 episodes

Welcome to Beyond The Beat. I’m Jared Linnen, and in this podcast, I will be diving deep into how some of the biggest and baddest albums were made. It’s the stories, the adversities these bands and artists had to overcome, and how these people got to that place in time where they were able to create a masterpiece of an album.

Beyond the Beat is meant to be a long-form podcast, combining my two favourite passions, music and history.

Beyond The Bea‪t‬ Jared Linnen

    • Music History
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Welcome to Beyond The Beat. I’m Jared Linnen, and in this podcast, I will be diving deep into how some of the biggest and baddest albums were made. It’s the stories, the adversities these bands and artists had to overcome, and how these people got to that place in time where they were able to create a masterpiece of an album.

Beyond the Beat is meant to be a long-form podcast, combining my two favourite passions, music and history.

    Ep. 10 | System Of A Down - Toxicity

    Ep. 10 | System Of A Down - Toxicity

    Like Systems debut album, Toxicity seemed utterly chaotic upon its first listen, but the small refinements of more melody helped it become more accessible and gain mainstream attention. Not even the events of 9/11, (a week after the album's release) and having Chop Suey ripped from radio playlists, could tear it from the airwaves. People were attracted to their distinct style of fun interesting guitar riffs, Serj’s ‘swiss army knife’ vocals on top of Daron’s strange singing, the fun and unconventional drumming, and the diversity of their songs. They managed to get more poppier over time without giving the feeling like they were selling out. Also, their politics weren’t so overt that it distanced certain listeners. They still had political songs, but they did so in a way that was more surreal, adventurous and musically accomplished without sacrificing any of the heaviness or intensity that got them signed to a record deal. 

    Toxicity provided a perfect soundtrack to post-9/11 anxiety. System in a lot of ways had a contradictory sound. It can sound both incredibly juvenile and surprisingly mature, which leaks in the lyrics as well. As Daron said in an interview, “We like to stay on that verse-chorus type of tradition except sometimes the verse will be a waltz and the chorus will be hardcore.” How many popular bands can say that Waltz is a component of their music? They didn’t follow the so-called rules of Heavy Metal. No one before sounded like System Of A Down, and no one really since. But as Rick Rubin said, they transcended not fitting in, and those are the best artists. Those are the revolutionary bands, and those are the ones that change the world.

    • 51 min
    Ep. 9 | Kanye West - The College Dropout

    Ep. 9 | Kanye West - The College Dropout

    Ambition is the key word for College Dropout. Kanye is saying if you work hard enough, you can achieve your dreams, like Kanye’s dream of working with Jay Z one day. Like Kanye’s dream of being respected as more than just a producer, but a rapper. It wasn’t easy. But maybe it was because of his near-death experience in a car accident, that he had this newfound perspective on life. College Dropout was Kanye’s 2nd chance. He was on borrowed time after he saw how fleeting life could be. College Dropout was his healing process, his rehabilitation album. As he says in Through The Wire.

    “I’m a champion, so I turned tragedy to triumph, Make music that's fire, spit my soul through the wire”

    Maybe at the end of the day, all Kanye wanted to do with College Dropout was establish himself as a rapper, but the album ended up expanding the musical and emotional language of hip-hop. Claiming to be the first 'n**** with a benz and a backpack', he challenged all the rules and boldly danced across boundaries others were too afraid to even acknowledge. A young man who told an underdog story of reaching independence. Achieving his creative aspirations, and speaking for the common man was what hip hop needed. But at the same time, you got a brazingly confident man who loved fashion, loved spending money, and loved women.

    A few years after its release, Kanye’s cousin, Devo Springsteen reflected on the album’s impact in an interview “There’s pre and post-'College Dropout.' Hip-Hop is often equated to rap music and there are a few kind of tribes within that demographic. You’re a gangster, a baller, a backpacker or you’re a seller. If you’re going to rap, which of the lanes are you coming from? I think with Kanye, his approach brought in different types of influences away from these categories. I can be from the suburbs, Midwest, I can wear Polo shirts and I am still Hip-Hop. As long as you’re honest about yourself, you’re Hip-Hop.”

    • 1 hr 25 min
    Ep. 8 | Pearl Jam - Ten

    Ep. 8 | Pearl Jam - Ten

    As debuts go, Ten was uncommonly intimate, dragging the listener through an array of emotions. Lyric topics range from incest, murder, growing up without a father, war and greed, suicide and bullying. Singer Eddie Vedder wore his heart on his songwriting sleeve. He was a happy-go-lucky surfer guy on the outside, but obviously was dealing with a lot personal issues internally.

    The songs moved people, showed them a new style of commitment that had been increasingly absent in rock. They were able to tow that line between offering an escape from the real problems in the world, and making the listener feel like they're not alone with those very same problems. Of getting a generation of kids singing a rallying cry about incest, “Oh, I’m Still Alive.”.

    As Eddie would later say, it was kind of a bummer all these songs about dark life issues were so relatable. But when you sell that many copies of a record, you know you’ve touched on something special….you’ve connected with an untold amount of people. While the lyrics touched on a variety of important topics, the music on Ten is groundbreaking. It combines the excitement of classic arena rock, the what-the-f*ck attitude of punk, high-speed psychedelic guitar virtuosity, and Vedder’s truly distinct vocals to create an absolute powerhouse of a listening experience.

    Ten would eventually be considered alongside Nirvana’s Nervermind as the dawn of the grunge movement. With a front-lines look at seeing what was popular in the 80’s nearing it’s end, Eddie wrote in RollingStone magazine’s 1991 Year In Review issue, “Finally, music gets to the point. Ian sings, ‘We’re all here’, Perry sings ‘These are the days’, Cornell sings, ‘The wreck is going down’, and he’s right. Wake up, or die in your sleep.”

    • 1 hr 21 min
    Ep. 7 | Nate Hilts of The Dead South (Interview)

    Ep. 7 | Nate Hilts of The Dead South (Interview)

    It was early August 2020, Fishing Lake, Saskatchewan, at the cabin of the lead singer/frontman of the Dead South, Nate Hilts. Over Jameson whisky and rye and cokes, I sat down with Nate to talk about the history of the band, how Nate got his start in music, what the band is up to since the COVID-19 pandemic hit, and an in-depth look into some of their songs, particularly off their 2014 debut album, Good Company. 

    • 1 hr 26 min
    Ep. 6 | The White Stripes - Elephant

    Ep. 6 | The White Stripes - Elephant

    Two opposing elements form the framework of the White Stripes, it's what makes them unique, strange, and so interesting. Jack and Meg White shroud themselves with mystery in their personal lives and they embrace cheap gimmicks such as a colour code, but the music they play harkens back to old Mississippi Blues from the 1930's with a Iggy and The Stooges 70's garage rock twist. The White Stripes are that simple in their music, and that complicated and mysterious with everything else. 
    It’s easy to point to their 2003 release of Elephant as the White Stripes best work because it has their biggest hit, Seven Nation Army on it, but the album is much more than that. Elephant saw a maturity in the band and the songwriting, more than the minimalistic rock sound of White Blood Cells, and more than the polish pop twist to their blues rock sound on De Stijl and their debut self-titled album. Who knew blues-tinged rock & roll scaled back to its most essential elements — one guitar, a simple drum kit and sneering vocals, could top the charts in the early 2000's. But as Jack says, "The whole point of the White Stripes is the liberation of limiting yourself." The limitation of being a two piece rock band and analog recording in a pro-tools world was against the grain and off the beaten path. But Jack and Meg never took the easy route, and that’s why they and their works like Elephant will be in the rock pantheon with their heroes.

    • 1 hr 42 min
    Ep. 5 | Motley Crue - Dr. Feelgood

    Ep. 5 | Motley Crue - Dr. Feelgood

    For the first time in their history, Motley Crue recorded an album with all 4 members completely sober. Without those usual distractions, they produced 1989’s Dr. Feelgood, their best selling record to date. Bassist and songwriter Nikki Sixx said, “In 8 years together and with millions of albums sold, we had never recorded properly.  No one had ever pushed us to the limits of our abilities before.”

    Dr. Feelgood capped off an era, a decade of decadance, and summed up what Motley Crue stood for. A glam-punk band that pulled no punches, not trying to be anyone else, with a focus on what was truly important, the music, and none of the other b******t. It was their finest effort, front to back. Motley Crue was able to create something inspired, glam, sleezy, emotional, upbeat, dirty, and as Nikki would later say, an album they were finally proud of.

    • 1 hr 8 min

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