18 episodes

Bite-size Taiwanese is a brand new podcast giving you a taste of real, everyday Taiwanese. Co-hosts Phil & Alan will guide you through the ins and outs of the Taiwanese language (Southern Min/Hokkien) with light-hearted, friendly (and occasionally funny) conversations on how it’s used in today’s Taiwan.

The Newbie level podcast, geared towards newcomers to this language, works great for those just looking to get their feet wet, and will handily equip visitors with basic survival Taiwanese skills. With just a few words, you’re sure to be rewarded with lots of warm, hearty smiles.

Bite-size Taiwanese | Newbie Bite-size Taiwanese

    • Language Learning

Bite-size Taiwanese is a brand new podcast giving you a taste of real, everyday Taiwanese. Co-hosts Phil & Alan will guide you through the ins and outs of the Taiwanese language (Southern Min/Hokkien) with light-hearted, friendly (and occasionally funny) conversations on how it’s used in today’s Taiwan.

The Newbie level podcast, geared towards newcomers to this language, works great for those just looking to get their feet wet, and will handily equip visitors with basic survival Taiwanese skills. With just a few words, you’re sure to be rewarded with lots of warm, hearty smiles.

    Ep16: Lunar New Year's Eve | Jī-káu-mê 二九暝

    Ep16: Lunar New Year's Eve | Jī-káu-mê 二九暝

    In this episode, we’ve talked about some of the Lunar New Year’s Eve traditions in Taiwan.
    (These show notes use tables and rich formatting. Please visit the episode webpage for an optimal viewing experience.)
    SENTENCES AND VOCABULARY



    TAIWANESE
    ENGLISH


    Sin-nî khuài-lo̍k!
    Happy New Year!


    sin-li̍k
    Western Gregorian calendar, literally the “new calendar”


    kū-li̍k
    the Traditional or lunar calendar, literally the “old calendar”. Also known as “lông-li̍k”, the “farming calendar”.


    sin
    new



    old


    kuè-nî
    the lunar new year, the turn of the year


    kuè
    to cross, to go over, to pass


    sin-tsiann / sin-tshun
    the lunar new year


    khuà-nî
    celebrating the New Year when going from Dec 31st to Jan 1st according to the Western calendar
    Usage note: a new term borrowed from Mandarin “kuànián” (in Mandarin Pinyin), used by some speakers.


    sin-nî ê guān-bōng
    New Year’s resolution


    guān-bōng
    wish, resolution


    jī-káu-mê
    New Year’s Eve (literally: “the 29th’s night”). Also referred to as “kuè-nî-àm”.


    tsiann-gue̍h tshe-it
    New Year’s Day


    tshe + number 1-10
    the 1st to 10th day of the New Year’s holiday or of any month in general; “tshe” means “beginning”.
    Pronunciation note: “tshe” is used with the colloquial reading of the numbers.


    sàng-sîn
    to make offerings to the Kitchen God on the 23rd or 24th of the 12th month


    uî-lôo
    to gather around with family and have a holiday feast during New Year’s Eve


    nî-tshài
    a dish served especially during the New Year’s eve dinner


    tshài
    dishes; vegetable


    tn̂g-nî-tshài
    a dish symbolizing “longevity”, eaten on New Year’s Eve
    Culture note: In Northern Taiwan, this tends to be “kuà-tshài” (mustard greens). In the south, it tends to “pue-lîng-á” (spinach), cooked as a whole bunch with the stalks and the roots.


    kuà-tshài
    mustard greens


    pue-lîng-á
    spinach


    kú-tshài
    garlic chives


    kú-kú-tn̂g-tn̂g
    an expression meaning “for a long, long time”


    thôo-tāu
    peanuts


    Tsia̍h thôo-tāu, tsia̍h kah la̋u-lāu-lāu.
    a saying to wish someone a long life: “eat peanuts, live until you’re old.”
    Pronunciation note: The first “lāu” changes to a mid-rising tone “la̋u”, or a ninth tone. If you want to know more about triplicated adjectives and this special tone change, check out our episode on the Ninth Tone from our Pronounce it Like a Pro podcast series.


    huat-kué
    Prosperity cake, a traditional steamed cake with a distinctive top split into 4 sections.
    Check out our Instagram for an image of huat-kué! Don't forget to follow us if you haven't already!


    tshài-thâu-kué
    turnip or radish cake


    tshài-thâu
    long white radish, also known as daikon


    hó-tshái-thâu
    a saying to wish someone prosperity


    tsuân ke
    whole chicken


    Tsia̍h ke, khí-ke.
    a saying that goes “eat chicken, and your home, family, or business will prosper”


    khí-ke
    to establish one’s home, family, or business


    sing-lé
    sacrificed animals or meat dishes made as offerings to gods or spirits


    uân-á
    meat balls


    hî-uân
    fish balls


    hê-uân
    shrimp balls


    thuân-înn
    getting together or having a reunion


    Tsio lí lâi tsia̍h ōng.
    a saying comprised of the fruits commonly used as offerings: “kin-tsio” (banana), “lí-á”(plum), “lâi-á” (pear), “kam-tsià” (sugar cane), and “ông-lâi” (pineapple), which is a homophone to “may prosperity and good fortune come to you”.


    kiat-á
    kumquats


    Tāi-kiat tāi-lī.
    an expression meaning “great luck, great profit”


    pài-pài
    worship; religious rituals which often include making offerings to ancestors and Gods and burning incense


    tē-ki-tsú
    the House God


    teh-nî ê âng-pau
    the New Year’s red envelope
    Culture note: the practice of older generations giving out red envelopes with money to younger gen

    • 27 min
    Ep15: What time is it? | Tsit-má kuí-tiám 這馬幾點?

    Ep15: What time is it? | Tsit-má kuí-tiám 這馬幾點?

    In this episode, we’ve learned how to ask “What time is it?”, “When are you going?”, and also time on the clock and different parts of the day.
    (These show notes use tables and rich formatting. Please visit the episode webpage for an optimal viewing experience.)
    SENTENCES AND VOCABULARY



    TAIWANESE
    ENGLISH


    Thô-hn̂g ki-tiûnn
    Taoyuan Airport


    ki-tiûnn
    airport


    ki-tiûnn tsia̍t-ūn
    airport MRT, or the Airport Metro Train


    tsia̍t-ūn
    MRT, metro


    Tâi-pak tshia-tsām
    Taipei Main Station


    Ko-thih
    High Speed Rail, HSR


    Lâm-káng tsām
    Nangang Station


    Thô-hn̂g tsām
    Taoyuan Station


    Tsit-má kuí tiám?
    What time is it?


    Tsit-má sì tiám sì-tsa̍p-gōo (hun).
    It is 4:45.
    Pronunciation note: The tone change of “tiám” is optional here.
    Usage note: For numbers larger than 10, the word “hun” (minute) is sometimes left off.


    tsit-má
    now


    tiám
    o’clock; dot, point
    Usage note: number (colloquial reading) + “tiám”. The “colloquial” reading of numbers is generally used for counting things. You can listen to episode 14 for more about the “colloquial” and “literary” pronunciations of numbers.


    tiám-tsing
    hour (duration)


    tsi̍t tiám-tsing
    one hour


    hun
    minute
    Usage note: “hun” can be used for both the minute of clock time and minutes in duration.


    hun-tsing
    minute (duration)


    tshit tiám (khòng) tsi̍t hun
    7:01


    káu tiám tsiànn
    9:00 on the dot; right at nine o’clock


    peh tiám puànn
    8:30; half past eight


    puànn
    half


    (tsi̍t) tiám puànn
    1:30; half past one


    gōo tiám tsa̍p-gōo (hun)
    5:15


    tsái-khí káu tiám
    9:00 in the morning


    tsái-khí
    morning, in the morning
    Culture note: There are a number of ways to say the different parts of the day, depending on dialect, regional preferences, and how specific you want to get, e.g. “daybreak” as opposed to “morning”. Beside “tsái-khí”, the word “morning” has other variations such as “tsái-sî-á”, “e-tsá”, and “e-tsái-á”.


    tiong-tàu tsa̍p-jī tiám
    12 noon


    tiong-tàu
    midday (usually 11-1pm)


    e-tàu
    afternoon; early afternoon


    e-poo
    afternoon; late afternoon


    àm-sî
    evening and night; nighttime


    e-hng / e-hng-àm
    evening and night; tonight
    Pronunciation note: “e-hng-àm” is usually contracted as “ing-àm”.


    puànn-mê / puànn-mî
    the 2-hour period around midnight; late into the night


    Lí tang-sî beh khì?
    When are you going?


    tang-sî
    when


    Guá e-poo beh khì.
    I’m going in the afternoon.


    Lí kuí tiám beh khì?
    What time are you going?


    Guá e-poo nn̄g tiám puànn beh khì.
    I’m going at 2:30 in the afternoon.


    In kuí tiám beh lâi?
    When are they coming?



    *Syllables that have been greyed out require tone changes.
    TIME PHRASE AND WORD ORDER
    In Taiwanese, the time is typically put before the verb, but still after the subject. Also notice that the preposition “at” in English is usually not needed or translated in Taiwanese.
    Within a time phrase, we always go from the general to the more specific, e.g. year → month → date/day → morning/evening → clock time.



    Subject
    Time
    Verb


    Guá
    e-poo nn̄g tiám puànn
    beh khì.


    (I)
    (afternoon, 2-o’clock-half)
    (am going)



    If you want to emphasize the time as the topic, it’s possible to move it before the subject at the front of the sentence.
    When forming a question, the question word for time like “tang-sî” (when), or “kuí tiám” (what time), is placed in the same position and the word order remains the same.



    Subject
    Question Word for Time
    Verb



    tang-sî
    beh khì?



    kuí tiám
    beh khì?



    For more about telling time and related expressions, go check out our downloadable workbook! You’ll also find additional vocabulary with characters, pronunciation notes, grammar explanations, culture tips, and fun exercises to help your practice.

    Music Credit: Tekno

    • 26 min
    Ep14: What is your phone number? | Lí ê tiān-uē kuí hō? 你的電話幾號?

    Ep14: What is your phone number? | Lí ê tiān-uē kuí hō? 你的電話幾號?

    In this episode, we’ve talked about the “literary” pronunciation of numbers. We’ve also talked about several number-related expressions and how to ask for someone’s phone number and year of birth.
    (These show notes use tables and rich formatting. Please visit the episode webpage for an optimal viewing experience.)
    THE TWO PRONUNCIATIONS OF TAIWANESE NUMBERS




    1
    2
    3
    4
    5


    Bûn-giân-im
    “Literary”
    it

    sam

    ngóo**


    Pe̍h-uē-im
    “Colloquial”
    “tsi̍t” (it)
    “nn̄g” (jī)
    sann

    gōo



    6
    7
    8
    9
    10


    Bûn-giân-im
    “Literary”
    lio̍k
    tshit
    pat
    kiú
    si̍p


    Pe̍h-uē-im
    “Colloquial”
    la̍k
    tshit
    pe̍h
    káu
    tsa̍p



    *Syllables that have been greyed out require tone changes.
    **For more on how to pronounce the "ng-" sound at the beginning of a syllable. Check out the Nasal Consonants & Vowels episode from our Pronounce it Like a Pro podcast series. 
    The “literary” reading for numbers are typically used in these contexts:

    Reading off digits, e.g. a phone number or a lottery number
    Specifying a year
    Within certain set phrases or expressions
    Some place names or people’s given names

    The “colloquial” reading for numbers are used in counting things and most other contexts. Note that the colloquial pronunciations for 1 and 2 are special cases. “Tsi̍t” and “nn̄g” are only used when counting one or two things.
    SENTENCES AND VOCABULARY



    TAIWANESE
    ENGLISH


    nn̄g tshing jī-tsa̍p-sì nî
    the year 2024; 2024 years


    jī khòng jī-sù nî
    the year 2024


    khòng
    zero


    Lí ê tiān-uē kuí hō?
    What is your phone number?


    lí ê
    your; yours


    tiān-uē
    telephone


    kuí
    how many; several



    (designated or ordinal) number


    khòng-kiú, pat-sam-ngóo-ngóo, tshit-pat-sù-lio̍k /
    khòng-kiú-pat-sam, ngóo-ngóo-tshit, pat-sù-lio̍k
    09-8355-7846
    0983-557-846


    Lí kuí nî tshut-sì?
    What year were you born in?


    tshut-sì
    to be born


    Guá it-kiú kiú-jī nî tshut-sì.
    I was born in 1992.


    Lí kuí nî-tshù?
    What year were you born in?


    nî-tshù
    year (usually of birth)


    Guá it-kiú kiú-jī.
    Me, 1992.


    sam-pat
    foolish, silly, ditzy (usually said of women)
    (literally: “38”)


    sam-pat hiann-tī
    to be overly polite among close friends (usually said among men)
    (literally: “38 brothers”)


    sam-tsân-ba̍h
    pork belly
    (literally: “3 layer meat”)


    sù-kuì
    the 4 seasons


    sù-hái
    the 4 seas; figuratively “the whole world”


    sù-ki
    the 4 limbs


    sù-thong-pat-ta̍t
    an expression describing really convenient and accessible transportation networks


    ngóo-hiang
    the 5 spices (usually star anise, cloves, fennel, cinnamon, and Sichuan pepper)


    ngóo-kok
    the 5 grains (usually rice, millet, corn, wheat, and soybeans); crops, grains in general


    ngóo-kim
    the 5 metals (usually gold, silver, copper, iron, and tin); hardware or ironware


    ngóo-kuan
    the 5 sensory organs (usually referring to the eyes, ears, nose, mouth, and body or heart); facial features


    ngóo-tshái
    really colorful


    lio̍k-ha̍p
    the 6 directions: East, West, South, North, Up, and Down; figuratively “everything under the sun” or “the entire universe”


    lio̍k-thiok
    the 6 domesticated animals (cow, horse, sheep, chicken, dog, pig); domesticated animals in general


    si̍p-jī-lōo
    the intersection, crossroads


    si̍p-tsuân-si̍p-bí
    a common saying expressing that something is completely perfect
    (literally: “10 completely 10 beautiful”)



    For more about numbers, literary and colloquial pronunciations and related expressions, go check out our downloadable workbook! It also gives you additional vocabulary with characters, pronunciation notes, grammar explanations, culture tips, and fun exercises to help your practice.

    Music Credit: TeknoAXE

    • 29 min
    Ep13: Days of the Week | Kin-á-ji̍t pài-kuí 今仔日拜幾?

    Ep13: Days of the Week | Kin-á-ji̍t pài-kuí 今仔日拜幾?

    In this episode, we’ve talked about the days of the week (Monday, Tuesday, etc.) in Taiwanese. Also, we learned about expressing days and weeks in a relative sense, such as “today” or “last week”.
    (These show notes use tables and rich formatting. Please visit the episode webpage for an optimal viewing experience.)
    SENTENCES AND VOCABULARY



    TAIWANESE
    ENGLISH


    hioh-khùn
    to take a break


    phah-sǹg
    to plan, to intend


    tshit-thô
    to play, to have fun; to go sightseeing


    Ua̍t-lâm
    Vietnam


    Thài-kok
    Thailand


    Sìng-tàn-tseh / Sìng-tàn
    Christmas


    Lí tang-sî beh khì?
    When are you going? When will you go?


    tang-sî
    when


    kin-á-ji̍t
    today


    tsa-hng / tsa̋ng
    yesterday


    bîn-á-tsài / miâ-á-tsài
    tomorrow


    tso̍h--ji̍t
    the day before yesterday


    āu--ji̍t
    the day after tomorrow
    Pronunciation note: “--ji̍t” in “the day after tomorrow” is always in the neutral tone. If you change the tone in the regular way, it becomes “some day in the future.”


    āu
    next or after
    Usage note: when “āu” is prefixed to the days of the week, remember to use the full form, e.g., “āu lé-pài-sann” (the Wednesday of the coming week), “āu lé-pài-ji̍t” (the Sunday of the coming week).


    āu-ji̍t
    some day in the future


    Kin-á-ji̍t pài-kuí?
    What day is today?


    kuí
    how many; several


    lé-pài-ji̍t / lé-pài
    Sunday
    Culture note: “lé-pài-ji̍t” literally means “the day of worship”, which originates from Christian culture. It was brought into Taiwanese long ago possibly by missionaries or through contacts with Western cultures.
    Usage note: the shortened form is used more often in common conversation.


    lé-pài
    Week
    Usage note: when “lé-pài” is used with “āu” (next), “tíng” (last), or numbers in the front, it only means “week”, not “Sunday”.


    (lé-)pài-it
    Monday
    Usage note: the shortened form is used more often in common conversation. This also applies to the other days of the week.


    (lé-)pài-jī
    Tuesday


    (lé-)pài-sann
    Wednesday


    (lé-)pài-sì
    Thursday


    (lé-)pài-gōo
    Friday


    (lé-)pài-la̍k
    Saturday


    āu lé-pài
    next week


    tíng lé-pài
    last week


    tíng
    last or previous
    Usage note: same as the usage of āu; when people add the days of the week after “tíng”, they usually use the full form, e.g., tíng lé pái-sann (the Wednesday of the previous week).


    Tsiok ta̍k-ke sìng-tàn khuài-lo̍k.
    Wishing everyone a merry Christmas.


    tsiok
    to offer good wishes; to congratulate


    khuài-lo̍k
    to be happy; happiness


    Sin-nî khuài-lo̍k!
    Happy New Year!


    Sin-nî
    New Year



    *Syllables that have been greyed out require tone changes.
    For more about how to talk about time, go check out our downloadable workbook! It also gives you additional vocabulary with characters, pronunciation notes, grammar explanations, culture tips, and fun exercises to help your practice.

    Music Credit: TeknoAXE

    • 16 min
    Ep12: Those jeans look good! | Hit niá gû-á-khòo tsin hó-khuànn 彼領牛仔褲真好看!

    Ep12: Those jeans look good! | Hit niá gû-á-khòo tsin hó-khuànn 彼領牛仔褲真好看!

    In this episode, we’ve talked about clothes shopping and learned some useful adjectives and intensifiers.
    (These show notes use tables and rich formatting. Please visit the episode webpage for an optimal viewing experience.)
    SENTENCES AND VOCABULARY



    TAIWANESE
    ENGLISH


    Hit niá gû-á-khòo tsin hó-khuànn!
    That pair of jeans looks nice!


    hit
    that


    tsit
    this


    niá
    (measure word for clothing)


    gû-á-khòo
    jeans


    khòo
    pants or trousers


    sann
    garments worn above the waist or clothes in general


    siat-tsuh
    shirt


    T-sioh / T-siat-tsuh
    T-shirt


    tsin (+adj)
    really, very


    tsiânn (+adj)
    really, very


    tsiok (+adj)
    truly, very, highly
    Usage note: “tsiok” usually sounds higher in degree than “tsin” & “tsiânn”


    hó-khuànn
    good-looking, pretty, to look good


    bô hó-khuànn
    not good-looking, to not look good


    pháinn-khuànn
    bad-looking, ugly, to look bad


    pháinn-tshuē
    hard to find


    Tsit niá gû-á-khòo bô ha̍h-su.
    This pair of jeans doesn’t fit.


    ha̍h-su
    (clothes) well-fitting


    Tsit niá khòo siunn sè niá.
    This pair of pants is too small.


    siunn (+adj)
    too, excessively



    small


    Lín kám ū khah tuā niá--ê?
    Do you have a bigger one?


    lín
    you (plural)


    kám...?
    (a question word)


    ū
    to have; to exist


    khah (+adj)
    more + adj. (comparative)


    tuā
    big


    --ê
    a … one; something that is...


    Lín kám ū phòng-se-sann?
    Do you have sweaters?


    phòng-se-sann
    sweater


    Tsit niá sann tsiok līng.
    This shirt is very loose/baggy.


    līng
    loose, slack, baggy


    ân
    tight, tense


    tn̂g
    long



    short


    tsē
    many, much


    tsió
    few, little



    *Syllables that have been greyed out require tone changes.
    SENTENCE PATTERN: SUBJECT + INTENSIFIER + ADJ
    In this episode, we’ve also learned a sentence pattern: “Subject + Intensifier + Adj.”



    Subject
    Intensifier
    Adjective


    Hit niá gû-á-khòo
    (that pair of jeans)
    tsiânn
    (very)
    hó-khuànn!
    (good-looking)


    Tsit niá
    (this one)
    siunn
    (too)
    līng.
    (loose, baggy, slack)


    Tsit niá khòo
    (this pair of pants)
    siunn
    (too)
    sè niá.
    (small + measure word)



    In Taiwanese it wouldn’t be a complete sentence if you only have the adjective. One common way is to add an “intensifier” as a placeholder.
    This is a little bit like in English when you want to qualify something or make a comment about the subject with an adjective (or the so-called “predicative” adjective), you often have to fill in a verb like “to be”.
    However, if you have a negative word such as “bô” (no, to not have), it can take the place of the intensifier so it’s not necessary to add an intensifier.
    For example:



    Subject
    Negative
    Adjective


    Hit niá gû-á-khòo
    (that pair of jeans)

    (not)
    ha̍h-su.
    (well-fitting)



    Big or small, many or few + measure word
    Also notice that, in the third example above, we add a measure word after the adjective: “sè niá”. When we say something is “tuā” (big) or “sè” (small), “tsē” (many) or “tsió” (few), it’s usually more natural to follow it with the appropriate measure word to form an adjective. But, this mainly applies to these four adjectives only.
    For more intensifiers and adjectives, go check out our downloadable workbook! It also gives you additional vocabulary with characters, pronunciation notes, grammar explanations, culture tips, and fun exercises to help your practice.

    Music Credit: TeknoAXE

    • 20 min
    Ep11: Do you speak Taiwanese? | Lí kám ē-hiáu kóng Tâi-gí 你敢會曉講台語?

    Ep11: Do you speak Taiwanese? | Lí kám ē-hiáu kóng Tâi-gí 你敢會曉講台語?

    In this episode, we’ve learned how to say “Do you speak Taiwanese?” and some responses to this question.
    (These show notes use tables and rich formatting. Please visit the episode webpage for an optimal viewing experience.)
    SENTENCES AND VOCABULARY



    TAIWANESE
    ENGLISH


    a-sa-puh-luh
    vulgar, indecent, messy, disorderly
    Culture note: the phrase comes from the Japanese word 朝風呂 (asa-buro), 朝 (asa) means “morning” and 風呂 (furo) means “bath”. People thought it was strange to take baths in the morning since they always took their baths at night after a long day’s work. It came to mean “indecent” and also “disorderly”, “lousy” or “a mess” in Taiwanese.


    Lí teh kóng siánn?
    What did you say? What are you saying?


    kóng
    to speak, to say


    Lí kám ē-hiáu kóng Tâi-gí?
    Can you speak Taiwanese?


    kám
    (Kám is a question word that turns a sentence into a yes-no question. You can think of it as “can it be possible that…”, “is it true that...”)


    ē-hiáu
    can, to know how to
    Usage note: usually referring to something that must be learned


    bē-hiáu
    can’t, to not know how to


    Guá bē-hiáu kóng Tâi-gí.
    I can’t speak Taiwanese.


    Guá ē-hiáu kóng tām-po̍h-á Tâi-gí.
    I only speak a little bit of Taiwanese.


    tām-po̍h-á
    a little, slightly


    Tâi-gí guá ē-hiáu thiann, bē-hiáu kóng.
    I understand but can’t really speak Taiwanese.


    Guá thiann-ū.
    I understand (it).


    Guá thiann-bô.
    I don’t understand (it).


    thiann-ū
    to understand


    thiann-bô
    to not understand


    thiann
    to listen to


    ū
    to have, to exist



    to not have, to not exist



    NAMES OF LANGUAGES
    Below are some names of languages we’ve mentioned in this episode.



    TAIWANESE
    ENGLISH


    Tâi-gí / Tâi-uân-uē
    Taiwanese language or spoken language
    Usage Note: “Tâi-gí” and “Tâi-uân-uē” are interchangeable. You can hear people say both though maybe “Tâi-gí” slightly more often.


    Tâi-bûn
    Taiwanese written language or literature


    Ing-gí
    English language or spoken language


    Ing-bûn
    English written language or English in general


    Ji̍t-gí / Ji̍t-pún-uē
    Japanese


    Tik-gí / Tik-kok-uē
    German


    Hân-kok-uē
    Korean


    Huat-gí / Huat-kok-uē
    French


    Se-pan-gâ-gí / Se-pan-gâ-uē
    Spanish


    Huâ-gí / Tiong-kok-uē
    Mandarin


    Tiong-bûn
    Chinese written language, or sometimes Mandarin


    Kok-gí
    the national language(s)
    Usage Note: you might also hear people refer to Mandarin as “Kok-gí”. In Dec. 2018, the National Languages Development Act came into effect and officially recognized local languages including Taiwanese. So the term “Kok-gí” does not exclusively refer to Mandarin any more and has become a controversial term for many.



    For more language names and how to talk about your language skills, go check out our downloadable workbook! It also gives you additional vocabulary with characters, pronunciation notes, grammar explanations, culture tips, and fun exercises to help your practice.

    Music Credit: TeknoAXE

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

FeiChangHaoKan ,

Well Done - Easy to learn

These guys are doing a great job teaching Taiwanese in bite-sized bits! It's great that they take the time to explain the intent of the words in real examples. Very effective learning! Thank you!

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