56 episodes

Black & Published brings you the journeys of writers, poets, playwrights, and storytellers of all kinds to discuss what it means to be a writer, dissect the writing process, and demystify the steps between concept and publication.

Black & Published Nikesha Elise Williams

    • Arts
    • 4.8 • 16 Ratings

Black & Published brings you the journeys of writers, poets, playwrights, and storytellers of all kinds to discuss what it means to be a writer, dissect the writing process, and demystify the steps between concept and publication.

    You Should be Horrified with Zakiya Dalila Harris

    You Should be Horrified with Zakiya Dalila Harris

    On this episode of Black & Published, Nikesha speaks with Zakiya Dalila Harris, author of the novel, The Other Black Girl. Zakiya spent nearly three years in editorial at Knopf/Doubleday before leaving to write her debut novel. Prior to working in publishing, Zakiya received her MFA in creative writing from The New School. Her essays and book reviews have appeared in Cosmopolitan, Guernica, and The Rumpus. 

    During the conversation, Zakiya discusses how the main setting of her novel is really a placeholder for any white/male dominated industry. The liberation she found in her big chop and how those feelings of hair tangled themselves in her fiction, and why she believes some of the circumstances of Black life in America are still absolutely horrifying. 
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    • 45 min
    Introducing URSA Short Fiction Podcast with Deesha Philyaw & Dawnie Walton

    Introducing URSA Short Fiction Podcast with Deesha Philyaw & Dawnie Walton

    Hey Black and Published family. I’m Checking in with you today to introduce you to a new podcast. The Ursa short fiction podcast hosted by Black & Published season 1 alums Deesha Philyaw and Dawnie Walton. 
    They’re also from Jacksonville, which is where I live so, you know, they get the extra hometown Duval love. 
    Join Deesha (The Secret Lives of Church Ladies) and Dawnie (The Final Revival of Opal & Nev) for author interviews, book club discussions, and immersive short stories — all celebrating fiction from some of today's most thrilling writers, with an emphasis on spotlighting underrepresented voices.

    Support their show by becoming a premium member! https://link.chtbl.com/kX4SGHQi
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    • 29 min
    Rooting for Horrible People with Carlos Allende

    Rooting for Horrible People with Carlos Allende

    On this episode of Black & Published, Nikesha speaks with Carlos Allende, author of the novel, Coffee, Shopping, Murder, Love. Carlos is  is a media psychology scholar and a writer of fiction. He has written two previous novels: Cuadrillas y Contradanzas, a historical melodrama set during the War of Reform, in Mexico, and Love, or the Witches of Windward Circle, a horror farce set in Venice, California. He teaches in the Writers’ Program at UCLA Extension and lives in Santa Monica with his husband.

    During the conversation, Carlos opens up about the childhood nightmare that inspired Coffee, Shopping, Murder, Love. Plus he discusses how he overcame more than 100 rejections to finally get this book in the world, his two biggest regrets in his writing career, and how he uses empathy to get people to reflect on the bad behavior of his characters and themselves. 
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    • 46 min
    Learning to Trust with Asantewaa Boykin

    Learning to Trust with Asantewaa Boykin

    On this episode of Black & Published, Nikesha speaks with Asantewaa Boykin, author of the poetry collection, Love, Lyric & Liberation. Asantewaa Boykin is a proud San Diego native who found her voice in Oakland, CA. Her poetry and art combines her love of words, storytelling, and resistance. Exploring topics like; space-travel, black-femme militancy, & motherhood. 

    During the conversation, Asantewaa discusses how she discovered her passion for writing in the pages of her nursing notebook, her tenuous relationship with organized religion, and why her poems are the one thing in the world she can absolutely trust. 
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    • 41 min
    A Better Black Man with Brian Broome

    A Better Black Man with Brian Broome

    On this episode of Black & Published, Nikesha speaks with Brian Broome, author of the award winning memoir, Punch Me Up to the Gods. Brian is a poet and screenwriter. He has been a finalist in The Moth storytelling competition and won the grand prize in Carnegie Mellon University’s Martin Luther King Writing Awards. He also won a VANN Award from the Pittsburgh Black Media Federation for journalism in 2019. He is currently a columnist for The Washington Post. 
    Over the course of the conversation, Brian opens up about growing up a young Black gay boy in Ohio, being addicted to drugs and alcohol, and how saying yes to getting clean led him to saying yes to writing. 


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    • 47 min
    Good Writing Isn't Dated with Chyrel Jackson & Lyris Wallace

    Good Writing Isn't Dated with Chyrel Jackson & Lyris Wallace

    On this episode of Black & Published, Nikesha speaks with Chicago area sisters Chyrel Jackson and Lyris Wallace, who wrote the poetry collections Different Sides of the Same Coin and Mirrored Images. The sisters said they came to their love of writing from their love of reading authors and poets like Nikki Giovanni, Sonia Sanchez, Terri McMillan and more. 




    Episode Notes
    _________________________
    On this episode of Black & Published, Nikesha speaks with Chicago area sisters Chyrel Jackson and Lyris Wallace, who wrote the poetry collections Different Sides of the Same Coin and Mirrored Images. The sisters said they came to their love of writing from their love of reading authors and poets like Nikki Giovanni, Sonia Sanchez, Terri McMillan and more. 

    During the discussion, the sisters open up about the pushback they received from publishers that forced them to go indie, the importance of not being white-washed and owning their own narrative, and the healing in hearing Black language whether it's spoken or sung. 
    Support the show

    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

PopStarIcon ,

Reinvigorating for Writers

I discovered this show a little under a month ago when I was in a sunken place with my writing. Black & Published is the equivalent of Oprah’s Super Soul, only for writers. Even when you feel like there’s nothing to learn from a guest, I am pleasantly surprised by how our journeys as writers of color are so different, yet somehow so the same. Each episode loans a teachable moment or take away from. As I listen I feel optimistic that my true literary tribe is out there, waiting on me to take my place in the Black & Published community. Each week Nikesha manages to motivate me to push forward so I can one day be on an episode, I’m already rehearsing my answers. Five stars isn’t enough!

Ms. Meltingpot ,

What a great show!

This is a great show for readers and writers. Nikesha asks great questions and lets the guests tell their full stories. I always feel a little bit smarter after listening and a little bit more inspired to get my novel done already!

kammbiamh ,

An excellent and much needed podcast

I just started listening a few days ago. The host does an excellent job of letting her guests share their writing and publishing journeys. I like the mixture of traditional and indie published writers on the podcast. Recommended.

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