53 episodes

Let’s talk about womanhood the world over. Despite making up over half of the global population, women control less wealth, own less land, hold fewer public offices, and shoulder more domestic burdens. But in every corner of every country there are individuals with enough gumption to break the system and bend the rules. That's why Sabrina Merage Naim and Kassia Binkowski are hosting intimate conversations with individuals who are changing the narrative for women everywhere.

Breaking Glass Evoke Media

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 47 Ratings

Let’s talk about womanhood the world over. Despite making up over half of the global population, women control less wealth, own less land, hold fewer public offices, and shoulder more domestic burdens. But in every corner of every country there are individuals with enough gumption to break the system and bend the rules. That's why Sabrina Merage Naim and Kassia Binkowski are hosting intimate conversations with individuals who are changing the narrative for women everywhere.

    In the wake of Roe: Hope in Ireland's example

    In the wake of Roe: Hope in Ireland's example

    Abortion saves lives. Abortion is healthcare. Abortion should never have been politicized.

    But it was. And in the wake of Roe v. Wade being overturned, when we're mostly full of anger and sorrow, we really need glimmers of hope. One such spark can be found in a place one might expect fervent opposition to abortion: Ireland. In this rerelease of one of our very first episodes, Ailbhe joins Sabrina & Kassia to share how she organized a national movement to legalize abortion in Ireland. They talk about:

    • Her experience growing up gay in a conservative Catholic community
    • How she navigated oppressive cultural gender expectations
    • Why the Irish campaign for reproductive rights was ultimately successful

    Like what you hear and want more? Sign up for our newsletter full of episode updates and resources on issues impacting women around the world. 

    • 31 min
    Political influence, double standards, and silencing women

    Political influence, double standards, and silencing women

    Many double standards exist for women and men, but perhaps none as ubiquitously as how they use their voice. A loud little girl is called bossy, a bold assertive woman is called a bitch. The same leadership qualities that we celebrate in men we often silence in women and Phumzile van Damme has experienced this at every turn of her career.

    Elected to serve as a Member of Parliament for South Africa at the age of 31, van Damme went on to hold positions of National Assembly Whip, Shadow Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies Committee, and National Spokesperson of her party. She is one of the most accomplished young, Black, female politicians in South Africa and yet the relentless pressure to silence her eventually led to her resignation in 2021. She joins Kassia to talk about:

    • Her political rise and her reputation for defying tradition and speaking out on behalf of gender equity
    • Her struggle with self-confidence and imposter syndrome
    • The attempts of organized gendered disinformation campaigns to undermine her political influence

    Like what you hear and want more? Sign up for our newsletter full of episode updates and resources on issues impacting women around the world. 

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Feminist rage and the power of women's anger

    Feminist rage and the power of women's anger

    Ever been called an angry feminist? Us too.

    Soraya Chemaly is a writer, speaker, and activist who studies the many reasons women have to be angry, and why they're called bitches, hot-headed, crazy feminists when they are. She is an award-winning activist, the best-selling author of Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger, and director and co-founder of the Women’s Media Center Speech Project. She joins Sabrina to discuss:

    • The reasons women have to be angry, from microaggressions to macro-level sexism
    • Why anger is actually one of the most hopeful, forward-thinking, and powerful emotions
    • Why men and women are conditioned to experience and display emotion differently

    Like what you hear and want more? Sign up for our newsletter full of episode updates and resources on issues impacting women around the world.

    • 50 min
    BONUS: What we must do now to save reproductive freedom

    BONUS: What we must do now to save reproductive freedom

    We’re releasing a bonus episode from 1972! Just kidding. We’re releasing a bonus episode from 2022 about what to do now that the United States is about to revoke the rights of millions of people with uteruses. Sabrina reaches back out to human rights attorney and previous guest, Julie Kay to talk about:

    •        What this legal ruling might mean for other rights
    •        Which interventions are and are not likely to work once Roe v. Wade is overturned
    •        How we keep going, keep fighting, and strategically channel our rage 

    Like what you hear and want more? Sign up for our newsletter full of episode updates and resources on issues impacting women around the world. 

    • 33 min
    Poetry, misogyny, and women's unpaid labor

    Poetry, misogyny, and women's unpaid labor

    It's not often that a poet's first paid piece of writing jumps to the top of the New York Times bestseller lists. Kate Baer's did. Her first book, What Kind of Woman was published in 2020 and followed shortly by a book of erasure poetry, I Hope This Finds You Well (2021). Both tackle the underlying treatment of women and mothers in modern society.

    Even if you haven't picked up one of her books (yet), you've probably seen her work, which regularly goes viral online. She joins Kassia to talk about:

    • The slow burn of being lost, overwhelmed, and undervalued as a woman and mother
    • The unreasonable expectations that society places on women and the support it fails to provide
    • The unglamorous realities of writing (hint: lots of misogyny, failures, emotional labor, and some very expensive childcare)

    Like what you hear and want more? Sign up for our newsletter full of episode updates and resources on issues impacting women around the world. 

    • 42 min
    Sexuality, consent, and BDSM

    Sexuality, consent, and BDSM

    In a country that criminalizes homosexuality, Kaz is an openly queer individual. Bisexual, lesbians, and transgender persons are not recognized by the Kenyan constitution and yet she lives openly and authentically while encouraging others to do the same.

    Kaz started her career as a singer and performer. In 2006, she won the Kora Award for The Most Promising Female Artist in Africa and was dubbed the Kenyan Queen of Soul. Today she is the host of The Spread, a sex-positive podcast that creates a safe space for people to understand their sexuality and learn to live confidently in awareness of their sexual identity. She joins Sabrina to talk about:

    • Her experience being sexually abused as a child
    • How she recovered from revenge porn as a young adult
    • What we can all learn from the bondage, discipline, dominance and submission and sadomasochism (BDSM) about consent

    Like what you hear and want more? Sign up for our newsletter full of episode updates and resources on issues impacting women around the world. 

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
47 Ratings

47 Ratings

kbartt ,

Powerful podcast

Love all the interviews and the hosts find such diverse amazing topics and women (with a few men too)

Crazytrain267 ,

Love it!

Great interviews and wonderful information. I learned so much from the podcasts.

HanDay100 ,

Good idea but…

The podcasters bring on very interesting and smart people to discuss gender and human rights. However, the hosts lens is clearly white feminism/savior feminism and discussions sometimes get pushed to meet their agenda rather than doing a deep dive into the guest’s expertise. Often it sounds like the hosts aren’t learning anything, but just get more rooted in their original opinion. Some interview questions feel as though they didn’t even listen to what their guest just said, which is jarring. If this is supposed to be an educational and explorative podcast the hosts need to write themselves out more and let their guests shine.

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