30 episodes

A Judicial Branch Podcast hosted by Mike Bowler. By listening to this podcast, attorneys can earn MCLE credits in Connecticut. Stay tuned for new Podcasts!

Calendar Call CT Judicial Branch

    • Government

A Judicial Branch Podcast hosted by Mike Bowler. By listening to this podcast, attorneys can earn MCLE credits in Connecticut. Stay tuned for new Podcasts!

    Inside the Court Service Centers

    Inside the Court Service Centers

    Episode 28 – Inside the Court Service Centers

    In this episode, Attorney Alexandra Gillett, program manager for the Superior Court Operations division of the Judicial Branch, describes the many services provided by the Court Service Centers to members of the bar and the public. The service centers are in place to provide resources and assistance to court patrons and increase access to court services and information through technology, user-friendly products and personable staff.
    Court Service Centers

    • 27 sec
    An Introduction to the Code Of Evidence

    An Introduction to the Code Of Evidence

    Episode 27 – An Introduction to the Code Of Evidence

    We start season 2 with the first episode of a multi-part series on the Code of Evidence featuring Appellate Court Judge Eliot Prescott. The first episode will provide an overview of the history and background of the code of evidence. The next episode will give a rough overview of the code and its structure. With our remaining episodes, we will dive deeper into the substance of the code with episodes on hearsay, witnesses and relevancy. We’ll end our series with a dos and don’ts podcast and highlight a few examples of common evidentiary problems.
    The code of evidence has its roots in common law dating back to our time as a colony. Over the last two-hundred years, the code has grown with statutory enactments. In 1975, the federal rules of evidence were codified for the first time. Following that, Connecticut began considering adopting its own code of evidence that would be easy to access. Early on, the plan for the code was that it would be a statute that contained all the rules of evidence. Once the process got underway, it became clear that the Judicial Branch would be better suited to make changes to the code than to undergo the process that would be required to change a statute. As such, the code was turned over to the judges of the Superior Court.
    Currently, the ultimate authority on the rules of evidence in Connecticut is the Supreme Court.
    Code of Evidence Oversight Committee of the Supreme Court
    Code of Evidence
    Summary of PA 14-120

    • 31 sec
    Season 2 Preview

    Season 2 Preview

    Season 2 of Calendar Call will kick off with the first episode of a multi-part series on evidence featuring Appellate Court Judge Eliot Prescott. We will also have episodes about Jury Administration and legal incubators, among other topics. If you have suggested topics, please e-mail us at CalendarCall@jud.ct.gov.

    Limited Scope Representation in Practice

    Limited Scope Representation in Practice

    Episode 26 – Limited Scope Representation in Practice

    Attorney Michael Bowler, Statewide Bar Counsel and Counsel to the Minimum Continuing Legal Education Commission, interviews Attorney Jeff Gentes from the Connecticut Fair Housing Center and Attorney Campbell Barrett from the Law firm of Pullman & Comley on the importance, concerns, complications, and applicability of the Limited Scope of Representation in different legal practices in Connecticut, from marital law to housing.
    Mike’s Practice Tips: Every fee agreement should be tailored to the exact issue the LSR is going to involve.
    Have an understanding of what you’re signing up for.
    If you don’t know the subject area, Limited Scope Representation is not going to help you.
    Resources from this episode:
    Connecticut Fair Housing Center: https://www.ctfairhousing.org/ , 860-263-0731
    The law firm of Pullman & Comley: https://www.pullcom.com/

    • 32 sec
    Nuts and Bolts of Limited Scope Representation

    Nuts and Bolts of Limited Scope Representation

    Episode 25 – Nuts and Bolts of Limited Scope Representation

    Attorney Damon Goldstein, Caseflow Management Specialist from Judicial Branch Court Operations, explains Limited Scope Representation in Connecticut, including how it came to be, the different types of LSR and how LSR can be used by attorneys. The different types of Limited Scope Representations are: appearances, counseling, coaching and ghost writing. Appearances can be self-explanatory, but the other areas are a bit more nuanced. For example, counseling is different from coaching in that counseling is generally advisory, whereas coaching is an explanation of a procedural nature. Some examples of coaching are how to examine a witness and how to introduce an exhibit. Lastly, ghost writing is something that is not allowed in other jurisdictions, but is allowed in Connecticut with a notation that a document was prepared with the assistance of counsel.
    Mike’s Rule to Remember: Don’t assume that just because there’s a self-represented party appearance that gives you the right to talk to that party about the case.
    Resources from this episode:
    Limited Appearance Form
    Certificate of Completion of Limited Appearance
    General Provisions Sections in Connecticut Practice Book:
    P.B. Sec 3-8(B), and 3-9(C)
    P.B. Sec 4-2(C), Ghost writing
    Rules of Professional Conduct:
    Sec 1.0 Definitions
    Sec 1.2 (C), Scope of Representation Rule
    Sec 1.5 (B) and (D) Fees
    Sec 4.2 Communications with Parties Represented by Counsel
    Access to Justice Commission

    • 34 sec
    Top 10 Ethical Pitfalls, pt. 2

    Top 10 Ethical Pitfalls, pt. 2

    Episode 24 – Top 10 Ethical Pitfalls, pt. 2
    Attorney Michael Bowler, Statewide Bar Counsel and Counsel to the Minimum Continuing Legal Education Commission, discusses the top 10 ethical pitfalls that new lawyers stumble into.This is part two of a two-part series. The ethical pitfalls discussed in this episode are: competency, civility, personal conduct and confidences.
    Mike’s Practice Tips: The commentary to Rule 1.1 requires that attorneys should be competent in technology.
    Rules of Professional Conduct

    • 29 sec

Customer Reviews

ericwass ,

Excellent

Great guests and topics

Ryan McKeen ,

Great Podcast

It’s fantastic that the judicial branch is making CLE accessible. Having had a solo practice, I know CLE can be very expensive. And sometimes it’s hard to take time away from the office or family. This is quality content that is free and accessible everywhere. Thank you.

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