21 episodes

Call & Response draws upon the blues tradition of communal music making and listening. Hosted by Nashville-based musician and poet Adia Victoria, each episode is a back and forth between Adia and her guests, between their present work, and the lineage of musical ancestors that came before them, and between Adia and you. 

Call & Response Sonos

    • Music
    • 4.9 • 113 Ratings

Call & Response draws upon the blues tradition of communal music making and listening. Hosted by Nashville-based musician and poet Adia Victoria, each episode is a back and forth between Adia and her guests, between their present work, and the lineage of musical ancestors that came before them, and between Adia and you. 

    Big Freedia: I Pray (And I Push)

    Big Freedia: I Pray (And I Push)

    In the final episode of this season, Adia is joined by “Queen of Bounce” Big Freedia. From Beyoncé to Kesha, Freedia’s collaborations proudly reflect her upbringing in New Orleans, and the spirit of the church that resides in her. Adia and Freedia talk about what it means to be insistent on pursuing liberation, the relationship between good food and good music, and the power of community. Thank you for joining us in another season of leaning into the blues. For the playlist of songs curated for this week’s episode visit: https://bit.ly/cr-freedia

    / Music In This Week's Episode /
    Roy Ayers Ubiquity, “Everybody Loves The Sunshine”
    Beyoncé, “Get Me Bodied”
    The Jacksons, “Blame It On The Boogie”
    Big Freedia (feat. Jake Shears and Anjelika “Jelly” Joseph), “Not Today”
    Tank and the Bangas (feat. Big Freedia), “Big”
    Missy Elliott, “Bomb Intro/Pass That Dutch”
    Robert Johnson, “Sweet Home Chicago”

    • 25 min
    Julien Baker: My Faith (Is The Fabric)

    Julien Baker: My Faith (Is The Fabric)

    The music of the South is always drawing upon the church, either relishing in it, or rebelling from it. When Memphis-born artist Julien Baker started reckoning with her faith, “the entire paradigm of my life evaporated.” Since then, Julien has channeled this reckoning into her music, lacing her lyrics with radical honesty and self-reflection. In this episode, Julien and Adia share about how their relationship to God and religion has influenced their music. For the playlist of songs curated for this week’s episode visit: https://bit.ly/cr-julien

    / Music In This Week's Episode /
    Robyn, “Between The Lines”
    Björk, “Big Time Sensuality”
    St. Vincent, “I Prefer Your Love”
    Patti Smith Group, “Because The Night”
    Hank Williams, “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry”
    John Coltrane, “A Love Supreme, Pt. 1 - Acknowledgment”
    Little Bandit, “Nashville”

    • 17 min
    Regina N. Bradley: Pleasure (For Pleasure’s Sake)

    Regina N. Bradley: Pleasure (For Pleasure’s Sake)

    From Bessie Smith to Megan Thee Stallion, Southern Black women have built on a long legacy of giving their bodies a voice through the blues. On this week’s Call & Response, hip-hop scholar Dr. Regina N. Bradley makes it clear that Southern Black music is not frozen in time, but embracing and challenging the issues connecting younger generations. For the playlist of songs curated for this week’s episode visit: https://bit.ly/cr-regina

    / Music In This Week's Episode /
    Rapsody, “Nina”
    Victoria Monét, “Ass Like That”
    Janet Jackson, “The Pleasure Principle”
    Angel Olsen, “Lark Song”
    The Chicks, “Gaslighter”
    Tweet feat. Missy Elliott, “Oops (Oh My)”
    Megan Thee Stallion, “Body”
    Nina Simone, “Feeling Good”

    • 24 min
    Tressie McMillan Cottom: Can’t Have The Beat (Without The Burden)

    Tressie McMillan Cottom: Can’t Have The Beat (Without The Burden)

    Tressie McMillan Cottom says the blues go beyond the beat and key. It’s a feeling born and inherited from the experience of Southern Black women. As Call & Response dives deeper into the blues, the sociologist and 2020 MacArthur fellow says she can hear the historical echoes of pain and urgency throughout Southern music -- and wants listeners to understand why they do too. For the playlist of songs curated for this week’s episode visit: https://bit.ly/cr-tressie

    / Music In This Week's Episode /
    The Shirelles, “Mama Said”
    Junior, “Mama Used To Say”
    2Pac, “Dear Mama”
    Gladys Knight and the Pips, “I’ve Got To Use My Imagination”
    Dolly Parton, “Coat of Many Colors”
    Odetta, “Mother’s Blues (Little Children Blues)”
    Nina Simone, “Blues for Mama”

    • 22 min
    Tré Burt: My Culture (My Identity)

    Tré Burt: My Culture (My Identity)

    What happens when one artist’s work is read through the lens of another? Tré Burt’s rambling bluesman sound means his music is constantly compared to that of Bob Dylan, but as a Black man living in 2021, his writing draws from very different perspectives. In this interview, Tré and Adia distinguish what it means to write from experience versus observation, share how working blue-collar jobs has fed their artistic careers, and remember the late, great John Prine. Hear a playlist of songs curated for this week’s episode at https://bit.ly/cr-tre.

    / Music In This Week's Episode /
    Tré Burt, “I Cannot Care”
    Waxahatchee, “Light Of A Clear Blue Morning”
    Lil Nas X, “Sun Goes Down”
    Adia Victoria, “Carolina Bound”
    Buster Benton, “Money Is The Name Of The Game”
    Bill Withers, “Lonely Town, Lonely Street”

    • 25 min
    Amythyst Kiah: Finding Roots (Redefining Yourself)

    Amythyst Kiah: Finding Roots (Redefining Yourself)

    Born in Chattanooga, and based in Johnson City, Tennessee, Amythyst Kiah’s sound is a blend of old-time music and fingerpicking blues with a punk-indie sensibility. Like many of us who came up in the South, Amythyst had to find and define her voice, even as she was told she couldn’t be into Green Day or into skateboarding and also play the guitar. This week’s episode of Call & Response is for the people who are facing the brave work of reclaiming themselves, for the people who have found solace in the company of a guitar, and it’s a hope for you – to keep pushing forward in your blues. For the playlist of songs curated for this week’s episode visit: https://bit.ly/amythyst.

    / Music In This Week's Episode /
    Leyla McCalla, “Girl”
    Precious Bryant, “Don’t Let The Devil Ride”
    Sunny War, “Mama’s Milk”
    Jessie Mae Hemphill, “My Daddy’s Blues”
    Elizabeth Cotten, “Gaslight Blues”
    Kyshona Armstrong, “Fear”
    Yasmin Williams, “Through The Woods”

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
113 Ratings

113 Ratings

loveiswise ,

Best interview show I’ve listened to in forever

This show is just amazing. I LOVE being able to hear through her questions that the host is also a musician, but her radio voice and the questions she asks are also really strong as if being a journalist is her main gig. The Lucy Davis interview is SO solid. I feel so lucky I stumbled onto this. This is really standout to me, as a person who listens to podcasts while working all day every day.

King biscuit ,

Blown away!

I am blown away by the content, the production quality, and the artistry Adia Victoria brings to interviewing. If I could give it 10 stars I would

sporkpost ,

I put apple podcasts back on my iPhone to leave this 5 star rating

I rarely hear a podcast I enjoy, but this one is fascinating and Adia Victoria is an incredible interviewer.

Top Podcasts In Music

The Black Effect and iHeartPodcasts
The Joe Budden Network
REVOLT
Double Elvis | Amazon Music
Barstool Sports
Rory Farrell & Jamil "Mal" Clay

You Might Also Like

Marc Maron
NPR
Team Coco & Earwolf
Pushkin Industries
The New York Times
The New York Times