143 episodes

If you were alive from 1945 - 1990, the Cold War was an ever-present reality. We grew up being told that the world could end any minute - and you probably wouldn't know it was coming until it hit. On this series we're going DEEP on the Cold War - why it happened, how it happened and where it left us. As with our other hit podcast series, this show contains heavy doses of bad language, irreverent humour and singalongs.

Cam & Ray's Cold War Podcast Cameron Reilly & Ray Harris

    • History
    • 4.1 • 120 Ratings

If you were alive from 1945 - 1990, the Cold War was an ever-present reality. We grew up being told that the world could end any minute - and you probably wouldn't know it was coming until it hit. On this series we're going DEEP on the Cold War - why it happened, how it happened and where it left us. As with our other hit podcast series, this show contains heavy doses of bad language, irreverent humour and singalongs.

    Where are the rest of the episodes?

    Where are the rest of the episodes?

    We have made the first few years of episodes free, but if you want to listen to the rest of the episodes, you’ll need to sign up to become a member of our site.

    • 55 sec
    #144 – The 1929 Riots

    #144 – The 1929 Riots

    In the early 1920s, violence between Muslims and the Jews continued to escalate. Because they didn't trust the British to defend their interests, the newly formed (and illegal) Jewish self-defense organization, the Haganah, was formed.  Churchill came to visit Palestine - and made things worse.  Without a doubt, the British military continued to favor the Arabs. General Sir Walter Congreve, commander of British forces in the Middle East, said in October 1921: “In the case of Palestine [the sympathies of the Army] are rather obviously with the Arabs,… the victim[s] of the unjust policy forced upon them by the British Government.”

    • 1 hr 1 min
    #143 – Fascist Jews

    #143 – Fascist Jews

    In the early 1920s, violence between Muslims and the Jews continued to escalate. Because they didn't trust the British to defend their interests, the newly formed (and illegal) Jewish self-defense organization, the Haganah, was formed.  Churchill came to visit Palestine - and made things worse.  Without a doubt, the British military continued to favor the Arabs. General Sir Walter Congreve, commander of British forces in the Middle East, said in October 1921: “In the case of Palestine [the sympathies of the Army] are rather obviously with the Arabs,… the victim[s] of the unjust policy forced upon them by the British Government.”

    • 1 hr 2 min
    #142 – The Unjust Policy

    #142 – The Unjust Policy

    In the early 1920s, violence between Muslims and the Jews continued to escalate. Because they didn't trust the British to defend their interests, the newly formed (and illegal) Jewish self-defense organization, the Haganah, was formed.  Churchill came to visit Palestine - and made things worse.  Without a doubt, the British military continued to favor the Arabs. General Sir Walter Congreve, commander of British forces in the Middle East, said in October 1921: “In the case of Palestine [the sympathies of the Army] are rather obviously with the Arabs,… the victim[s] of the unjust policy forced upon them by the British Government.”

    • 52 min
    #141 – Dirty Idle Wasters

    #141 – Dirty Idle Wasters

    When the British finally captured the Middle East from the Ottomans in October 1918, under the command of General Edmund Allenby, with the support of TE Lawrence and his Sharifians, Hussein and Faisal, the British immediately tried to walk back on the Sykes-Picot agreement.  They figured they did all the hard work, so f**k the French. 

    • 58 min
    #140 – The Rothschilds And Zionism

    #140 – The Rothschilds And Zionism

    The Rothschilds And Zionism - The Balfour Declaration took the form of a letter, dated November 2, 1917, from the foreign secretary to Lord Lionel Walter Rothschild, a British banker and zoologist, who headed Britain’s Zionist Federation.

    • 1 hr 6 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
120 Ratings

120 Ratings

Angelo Iaconetti ,

Special Agent Harris

Wikipedia suggests that the Cold War began in 1947 and ended in 1991, but 1947 is actually a bit late. After all it has been 4 years and 152 episodes, and Cam and Ray’s Cold War podcast has yet to even reach that initial year (1947) of the Cold War in their show.

There have been a few times when it seemed as if the podcast would make it into the timeframe in which the Cold War actually occurred. For example, there were episodes on the Marshall Plan which brought the listener up to 1948, and things seemed to be progressing nicely. However, those episodes were quickly followed by shows that had the narrative hopping back to the 1919 Paris Peace Conference in order to detail Ho Chi Minh’s early struggles for Vietnamese independence from France. After about 30 years of Ho’s story, and once again approaching 1947, the two decided to take the story back to… you guessed it, 1919- for a second crack at the first Red Scare. This pattern of nearing the 1950s before returning to the teens or earlier has been repeated like clockwork on this show. It has led this listener to conclude that the only thing that we can be sure of moving forward is that this podcast is set to last longer than the actual Cold War did.

That is because though, as with all of Cam and Ray’s shows, they are so well-researched, informative, enlightening and entertaining that it takes a tremendous amount of time and backstory to deliver the comprehensive chronicle of hilarious history that they consistently produce.

I, however, would like to shift gears now and take the opportunity to focus the remainder of this review on something that I deem far more important.

After listening to these guys for half of a decade, the true nature of this series has become evident to me. While on the surface, it appears that Cam is the commie-loving red menace of the pair, I have deduced that Ray is actually the secret agent of international communism that we need to fear.

There is no possible way that someone who claims to have grown up and lived in the United States for the past 50 years can know so little, not only about American history and the Cold War, but about average everyday American life and popular culture in general. This is evidenced every time Cam, in the midst of one of his rants usually, forgets an anecdote or tidbit about something and asks Ray for some assistance in recalling it. Cam will ask, “What was the name of that song,” or that “show,” or even for help remembering a common phrase or word from ordinary present-day vernacular. Without fail, Ray’s eternal response is, “oh, I don’t remember” or “I’m not sure.”

Yet, he claims he was born in South Carolina and lived much of his life in Virginia. Please!

If you have ever seen the 1980s movie, The Experts, starring John Travolta, you will notice that Ray’s level of American cultural awareness is tantamount to the film’s KGB spies in training. It confounds me that nobody else has picked up on this.

Despite this realization, the show is extraordinary and is seriously worth a listen. If you think you know everything there is to know about the Cold War, think again. These guys take it to another level.

As with all of their shows, 5 stars- only because I am not allowed to give more.

seevivasing ,

Problematic Almost Fave

It feels like getting punched in the stomach every time Cam yells the N word into the mic, even though he thinks he’s being funny, even though he’s not American. I like the relationship between the hosts, and I appreciate their delivery and reiteration of well rounded and well researched information that’s complex and important, but it’s so hard to decide if I should continue to listen when I’m cringing, wondering if there’s going to be another unnecessary use of a serious slur.

Cenizo99 ,

Why??

Disappointing sexist comments in the middle of interesting thoughtful historical analysis. Why?

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