8 episodes

Densho’s new podcast, Campu, tells the story of Japanese American incarceration like you've never heard it before. Brother-sister duo Noah and Hana Maruyama weave together the voices of survivors to spin narratives out of the seemingly mundane things that gave shape to the incarceration experience: rocks, fences, food, paper. Follow along as they move far beyond the standard Japanese American incarceration 101 and into more intimate and lesser-known corners of this history.

Campu Densho

    • History
    • 5.0 • 141 Ratings

Densho’s new podcast, Campu, tells the story of Japanese American incarceration like you've never heard it before. Brother-sister duo Noah and Hana Maruyama weave together the voices of survivors to spin narratives out of the seemingly mundane things that gave shape to the incarceration experience: rocks, fences, food, paper. Follow along as they move far beyond the standard Japanese American incarceration 101 and into more intimate and lesser-known corners of this history.

    Food

    Food

    Food is more than just sustenance. It’s a vehicle for culture, a way to delight in the world around us, engage our senses, connect with other people. It’s how we tell someone we love them. It’s the lessons we pass down between generations—and the ones we don’t. This episode is about food in Japanese American concentration camps. It’s about mutton, so much mutton...but it’s also about disrupted traditions, about memory, about politics, and about subtle—and not so subtle—acts of resistance.

    • 50 min
    Latrines

    Latrines

    In this episode, we talk about everything you never wanted to know about latrines in WWII Japanese American concentration camps. Our research may have gone down the toilet, but we promise this story isn’t all about poop. We’ll look at how incarcerees adapted to extremely adverse conditions and the unique challenges women incarcerees faced, including sexual violence and harassment.

    See episode transcripts and learn more at www.densho.org/campu
    Resources for teaching with Campu can be found at www.densho.org/campu-education-hub

    Follow @DenshoProject on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

    • 39 min
    Cameras

    Cameras

    Pictures allow us to peer into the past, but those images are often far more complicated than what initially meets the eye. Photographs (and the people who took them) portrayed Japanese Americans as menacing threats, as hapless victims, as model Americans. But there were also covert acts of resistance playing out on both sides of the camera. In this episode, we talk about the visual record of WWII incarceration and the stories that unfolded behind the lens. About what you see — and what you don’t.

    See episode transcripts and learn more at www.densho.org/campu
    Resources for teaching with Campu can be found at www.densho.org/campu-education-hub

    Follow @DenshoProject on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

    • 42 min
    Mid-Season Announcement

    Mid-Season Announcement

    Thanks for subscribing to Campu -- we hope you like what you’ve been hearing so far. We’re going to take a short break while we work on this season’s remaining three episodes, but we’ll be back on January 6th with more stories about life in Japanese...

    • 1 min
    Fences

    Fences

    Not all fences are of the white picket sort. Many, in fact, represent a reality that goes against everything America imagines itself to be. In this episode, we’re going to talk about the barbed-wire fence of World War II concentration camps -- what it...

    • 44 min
    Paper

    Paper

    After Japanese Americans were released from incarceration, most of what remained were mounds and mounds of paper. Papers that told us about choices the incarcerees made, big and small. About how even in camp, people were still just being people. In this...

    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
141 Ratings

141 Ratings

あるくさん ,

Great

Love this podcast! Although, especially the episode of “Fence”, one guy was speaking in Japanese and the translation was completely different 😂 this guy was taking about how many people had to fit in a camp and there was a guy from Utah, and then end up talking about Landry 🤣 Anyway I love this show!!! Thank you so so much for all your effort to brig all these together. Can’t imagine how much work was done to create this!

Mrs. KK ,

Heartbreakingly Beautiful

If I had to sum everything up in one word it would be: Wow.
This podcast is so well done! One of the best I’ve ever listened to. It’s well researched, well mixed, informative yet not boring. As the granddaughter of incarcerated Japanese Americans (Tule Lake) and an internment camp scholar, I appreciate all the hard work and effort that Hana, Noah, Densho and their crew put in to make this possible. As a mother of young daughters, part of my drive to research this dark time in history is to make sure my children and their children do not forget about these stories. Also as the Campu narrators would suggest, history is repeating itself in different forms. This work is still current, urgent, and needed to promote healing and a better society for the next generation.
Mahalo (thank you) to all who made this podcast possible. It is a true treasure and I cannot wait until Season 2.

albany mama ,

Outstanding podcast

We are in the golden age of podcasts and this is the one of the best I’ve ever listened to. The creators blend personal narrative with oral history with insights from historians of every stripe to create a deeply moving and fascinating set of shows. My favorite so far is the episode on cameras which helped me understand the origins of the model minority stereotype in new ways. Especially now it seems so important to understand how deep the roots of anti-Asian hatred run.

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