124 episodes

Cargo Facts Connect addresses all things freighters and aircraft. Connect delves into what's new in freighter transactions, belly capacity trends, conversion activity and aircraft finance. Brought to you by Cargo Facts, long the industry's leading information resource on freighter aircraft, Cargo Facts Connect gets you inside the freighter business.

Cargo Facts has been the newsletter of record of the air cargo and freighter aircraft industries for over 40 years. Cargo Facts, published by Royal Media, provides its readers with timely, actionable news and industry intelligence. The deep value in Cargo Facts centers on its detailed coverage of the market and exploration of every nuance of air cargo and freighter aircraft.

Cargo Facts offers a Premium subscription service, which includes a digital monthly newsletter, a weekly email Update, exclusive event discounts, and more. The Cargo Facts Premium subscription provides its subscribers with unparalleled coverage of the market. Subscribe now at https://cargofacts.com/subscribe/.

Cargo Facts produces the following leading industry events: Cargo Facts EMEA, Cargo Facts Asia and the Cargo Facts Symposium.

Cargo Facts Connect Cargo Facts

    • News
    • 1.8 • 5 Ratings

Cargo Facts Connect addresses all things freighters and aircraft. Connect delves into what's new in freighter transactions, belly capacity trends, conversion activity and aircraft finance. Brought to you by Cargo Facts, long the industry's leading information resource on freighter aircraft, Cargo Facts Connect gets you inside the freighter business.

Cargo Facts has been the newsletter of record of the air cargo and freighter aircraft industries for over 40 years. Cargo Facts, published by Royal Media, provides its readers with timely, actionable news and industry intelligence. The deep value in Cargo Facts centers on its detailed coverage of the market and exploration of every nuance of air cargo and freighter aircraft.

Cargo Facts offers a Premium subscription service, which includes a digital monthly newsletter, a weekly email Update, exclusive event discounts, and more. The Cargo Facts Premium subscription provides its subscribers with unparalleled coverage of the market. Subscribe now at https://cargofacts.com/subscribe/.

Cargo Facts produces the following leading industry events: Cargo Facts EMEA, Cargo Facts Asia and the Cargo Facts Symposium.

    Modern Logistics’ Koga at Cargo Facts LATAM 2024

    Modern Logistics’ Koga at Cargo Facts LATAM 2024

    Brazil added its second 737NG freighter operator this year when Modern Logistics began flying the type, even as some of the country’s other carriers take on more Classics.
    Modern Logistics is undergoing a transformation to grow its presence in the logistics industry.
    “Part of this investment plan was to bring new aircraft,” Chief Executive Cristiano Koga said during a fireside chat at Cargo Facts LATAM 2024 in Panama City this month. Excerpts of this conversation are included in today’s episode of the “Cargo Facts Connect” podcast.
    “We are very confident that the aircraft that we have signed and are already operating in Brazil will help us achieve this long-term goal to be an integrated logistics provider with a time-definite product end to end,” Koga notes in the chat.
    Modern has leased two 737-800BCFs from BBAM, with the 2004-vintage unit 33566 arriving in October 2023 and its 2003-vintage sibling (33550) arriving in February 2024. They join one 737-400F (25374) and one 737-300F (24219).
    “The performance of [the -800s] from a payload perspective, from a cost-to-serve-per-unit perspective is amazing,” Koga said. “So, we’re very excited about the fleet. But again, it needs to serve the right industry, the right sector and the right routes. That’s why one of the pillars of our long-term strategy is network planning.”
    Even though Modern has phased out a 737-400F and a 737-300F, it still sees a use for them in at least the next six to twelve months.
    “The -300 makes sense for specific projects, like charters or even e-commerce, because it’s the cheapest aircraft,” Koga said. “So, we still have the Classics, we have the two NGs, and it’s proving to be a very good decision to apply [the Classics] to these kinds of projects and leave the NGs for the big routes and international expansion as well.”
    Countries at the top of the list to see Modern’s 737-800BCFs include Argentina, Chile and Colombia, he added.
    Tune in to this week’s “Cargo Facts Connect” for the discussion with Koga.

    • 13 min
    Hamden Aviation discusses LatAm’s freighter appetite

    Hamden Aviation discusses LatAm’s freighter appetite

    Hamden Aviation is focusing on Latin America as it looks to grow its presence in the freighter segment. 
     
    The Hamden, Conn.-based lessor began supporting the industry by providing CFM56-3C1 engines to cargo operators with 737 Classics. 
     
    “It was just sort of an organic entry [into the freighter space] from the -3C1 market, then working with Classics, then having opportunities, primarily with a focus on emerging markets,” Executive Vice President Dora Alexander told Cargo Facts at Cargo Facts LATAM 2024 in Panama City this week. 
     
    Hamden hopes to increase its market share in Latin America and capitalize on the region’s demand for 737 Classic freighters.
     
    “We believe the appetite is there,” Angel Mora, financial analyst at Hamden, says in this week’s episode of “Cargo Facts Connect.” “We’re talking about phasing into Classics and getting rid of the 727s, so there are still plenty of companies out there that are looking for Classics.” 
     
    Additionally, the lessor plans to add the ATR 72-500F to its freighter portfolio and is evaluating Embraer’s new E190F and E195F conversions. 
     
    “We think [the E-Jet platform] makes a lot of sense in terms of that replacement for the -300 and for that sector of the narrowbody,” Alexander says. “So, it really marries well with our relationships in emerging markets and our current lessee base as well as the international connections that we have.” 
     
    Tune in to this week’s “Cargo Facts Connect” to hear more on Hamden Aviation as Alexander and Mora speak with Cargo Facts Editor Jeff Lee in Panama City. 

    • 12 min
    Singapore Airlines’ Tan at Cargo Facts Asia 2024

    Singapore Airlines’ Tan at Cargo Facts Asia 2024

    Singapore Airlines is preparing for the arrival of its first A350F as it continues to manage the hurdles challenging the freighter market.
    The airline will gradually retire its 747-400Fs as Airbus starts delivering its new large-widebody in 2026, but no estimate has been given for when the transition will be complete.
    “It’s really a lot of work, and rightly so,” Singapore Airlines Senior Vice President of Cargo Marvin Tan said during a fireside chat at Cargo Facts Asia 2024 in Singapore last week. “I mean, we really have to go through all of our processes, our systems, our training, our preparedness, even staff engagement, with a fine-toothed comb.”
    Listen to Tan on the latest episode of the “Cargo Facts Connect” podcast.
    Singapore Airlines was the first 747-400F operator to commit to the A350F and has seven on firm order.
    “From an operational perspective, I think two things. One is that, obviously, you lose the nose-loading capability; for us this is a fairly small segment of the cargo, so I think it’s manageable for us,” Tan says. “The other aspect, of course, is more just the loading configuration, because of the different contours of the aircraft, so some adjustment needed there.”
    Geopolitical and economic issues as well as labor and supply chain challenges continue to affect the airfreight industry.
    “All these factors come into play in terms of us figuring out how best to make use of the capacity that we have on hand, until, of course, the A350Fs come online,” Tan says.
    Tune in to this week’s “Cargo Facts Connect” to hear an edited extract of the discussion with Tan.

    • 16 min
    Airbus’ Hamilton on A350F, plus CFA 2024 preview

    Airbus’ Hamilton on A350F, plus CFA 2024 preview

    Airbus is making steady progress in the industrialization phase of its new A350F program as components come together and test rigs take shape.
    “We’re sorting through and finalizing the processes for assembly ready for next year, into final assembly and then first flight,” Airbus Head of Freighter Marketing Crawford Hamilton tells Cargo Facts in this week’s episode of the “Cargo Facts Connect” podcast. “In the meantime, we test and test and test because one of our big targets is to make sure that we have a mature aircraft at EIS.”
    Airbus ended 2023 with firm orders for fifty A350Fs thanks to deals in December with Cathay Pacific for at least six and with Turkish Airlines for at least five.
    The European planemaker added five A350Fs to its backlog in March after receiving an order from Taiwan-based Starlux Airlines.
    “It shows what we’re doing is right and everything I’ve talked about is really coming to fruition and people are starting to see,” Hamilton said.
    Airbus and its suppliers are preparing full-scale mockups of components, including the cargo-loading system and the cargo door. Production of the prototype’s fuselage began in 2023.
    The first delivery and entry into service of the A350F will take place in 2026.
    Tune in to this week’s “Cargo Facts Connect” to hear more on Airbus freighters, and get a sneak peek at next week’s Cargo Facts Asia event in Singapore with Titan Aviation Leasing Chief Commercial Officer Eamonn Forbes and World Star Aviation Chief Marketing Officer Nuno Leal.

    • 22 min
    Emirates’ Nadeem Sultan on cargo growth

    Emirates’ Nadeem Sultan on cargo growth

    Dubai-based Emirates is due to start taking delivery of some of its five new 777Fs this year as part of a 2022 order with Boeing.
    The carrier has returned four 777Fs to lessor DAE Capital over the past five years but also added two new units in May and June 2023, bringing its fleet back to eleven 777Fs.
    Further growth is on the way, with Emirates planning to convert ten 777-300ERs with IAI.
    Though 2023 may have been a lackluster year for freighter operators, Emirates is more optimistic about 2024.
    “The year has started up very strongly; we’re seeing exceptionally high tonnages for this time of the year for traditional, past years, I would say,” Nadeem Sultan, senior vice president of freighters and cargo planning at Emirates, tells Cargo Facts in this week’s episode of the “Cargo Facts Connect” podcast, recorded at the IATA World Cargo Symposium 2024 in Hong Kong this month. “So, from that perspective, it looks like a promising year for airfreight overall. We think we probably should expect a growth from 1 to 2% overall in the airfreight market this year.”
    Emirates’ expansion and development are twofold, involving more than the fleet.
    “There’s a lot of aircraft capacity coming in — both passenger as well as freighter — over the coming couple of years,” Sultan said. “But equally, we’re looking at really investing into the future for our air cargo infrastructure in Dubai, in terms of a new air cargo terminal and expanding our current capabilities. And that’s something that’s going to be a key component as well of Emirates SkyCargo’s future growth strategy.”
    Tune in to this week’s podcast to hear more on Emirates as Sultan speaks with Cargo Facts Editor Jeff Lee in Hong Kong.

    • 16 min
    Haite’s Chin on strategic growth, freighter conversions

    Haite’s Chin on strategic growth, freighter conversions

    ST Engineering last week took redelivery of the first EFW A321-200P2F conversion to be carried out at the Haite Tianjin facility.
    Freighter conversions are not new to Haite Tianjin, but the company plans to increase its activity in the segment.
    “This business is a very strategic decision because we need to have a mixture of work and the type of work is important to us,” General Manager Ivan Chin tells Cargo Facts in this week’s episode of the “Cargo Facts Connect” podcast, recorded at the redelivery ceremony in Tianjin.
    Haite Tianjin has provided touch labor for IAI’s 737NG conversions since 2019 and has completed thirteen 737-800BDSFs and -700BDSFs to date.
    The company last week also broke ground for a third hangar offering three additional narrowbody bays for conversions and other MRO work. The hangar is expected to be completed in the second half of 2025.
    “[Doing conversions] actually has a lot of this repeatable work that we are looking at,” Chin said. “After the third-phase expansion, that is exactly where we are looking at expansion to cater for the growth, especially in the A320 and A321 cargo conversion market.”
    Tune in to this week’s podcast to hear more on Haite as Chin speaks with Cargo Facts Editor Jeff Lee in Tianjin.

    • 7 min

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