242 episodes

Carmelite Conversations focuses on the teachings of Carmelite Spirituality and its application to our busy lives. It provides advice on how to live the Carmelite call to combine contemplative prayer with service to the Church. Topics are especially pertinent to those who are Secular Carmelites or considering the call to Carmel.

Carmelite Conversations Carmelite Conversations

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.6 • 23 Ratings

Carmelite Conversations focuses on the teachings of Carmelite Spirituality and its application to our busy lives. It provides advice on how to live the Carmelite call to combine contemplative prayer with service to the Church. Topics are especially pertinent to those who are Secular Carmelites or considering the call to Carmel.

    Interior Castle through the Our Father Prayer (part 1)

    Interior Castle through the Our Father Prayer (part 1)

    St. Teresa of Avila, in her classic masterpiece, The Interior Castle, teaches us how to become more intimate with God by journeying through the seven mansions/dwelling places of this interior castle of our soul.  A great way to identity each of these degrees of intimacy with God is through the “Our Father” prayer.  This provides a new perspective that can be very helpful in understanding this journey as well as in deepening our prayer.
    Sources:
    “The Interior Castle:  Study Edition” by St. Teresa of Avila, Translated and Prepared by Kieran Kavanaugh, O.C.D.; ICS Publications.
    “The Interior Journey Toward God: Reflections from Saint Teresa of Avila” by John Paul Thomas; My Catholic Life! Inc. (www.mycatholic.life)
    “The Interior Liturgy of the Our Father” by R. Thomas Richard, 3rd Edition; Fidelis Presentations.
     
     

    • 32 min
    Replay: St. Teresa Margaret and the Practice of the Presence of God

    Replay: St. Teresa Margaret and the Practice of the Presence of God

    This episode is a replay of a popular episode from 2019.
    One of the single most important disciplines we can adopt is the continual practice of the presence of God in our lives. This practice is not achieved by simply thinking about God be everywhere, though certainly He is all around us as well as in us, and we should take great comfort in this reality. Beyond this, however, we should recognize that the real challenge of the practice of the presence of God, is for us to make ourselves present to Him. It is for us to be continually aware that He is looking at us with His loving gaze, and that we should constantly be desiring to respond to the promptings of the Holy Spirit dwelling within us. In this program, France Harry takes us through the very practical means St. Teresa Margaret of the Sacred Heart used to keep herself continually aware of and present to God. The central focus of Teresa Margaret's practice was her devotion to the Blessed Sacrament. In this regard, she not only fulfilled all of the communities requirements for adoration, but she also remained constantly disposed to a state of adoration whenever she was anywhere near where the Blessed Sacrament was retained. She would literally genuflect towards the room where the tabernacle was kept, whenever she entered the hallway outside that room. She was known to rest her head on the wall, while sitting on a bench, just outside the same room. Just as important as these physical gestures directed toward the Blessed Sacrament, were Teresa Margaret's charitable commitment to her sisters in the convent. She realized that because she herself could not actually serve Christ in a physical way, she would have to find Christ in all the individuals she came in contact with in her life in Carmel. Regardless of whether these individuals responded to her with equal charity, Teresa Margaret always labored to be as kind and patient towards everyone as she could. Indeed, if there were some who may have treated her with disdain, and some did, then Teresa Margaret sought to serve these women all the more. She always maintained the guidance provide to her by our Lord: ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family,] you did it to me.’ (Matthew 25:40-45)
    If you are seeking a little guidance, some encouragement, and a model for how to advance in the practice of the presence of God, then this is a very valuable program to help provide you all three.

    • 52 min
    Christ Made Manifest (Epiphany)

    Christ Made Manifest (Epiphany)

    This homily by Deacon Rusty Baldwin, OCDS, was given during Evening Prayer for the Dayton Secular Order of Discalced Carmelites on Feast of the Epiphany in Jan 2023.
    Many interesting aspects of Epiphany are brought to our attention that one may not have considered before.  We know the Magi came to the Infant Jesus bearing gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh by following a star; but listen to these questions Deacon Baldwin asks, that will lead us to ponder this feast ever more deeply.  He references some very interesting thoughts from St. John Chrysostom, a Doctor of the Church, from the 4th century. 
    Deacon Baldwin then challenges each of us to be epiphanies, manifestations of our Lord to all we meet.  What does that involve?  Take this spiritual challenge and be the light of Christ to the world.
     
     

    • 9 min
    Rejoice and Be Light (Homily by Fr. John MacQuarrie)

    Rejoice and Be Light (Homily by Fr. John MacQuarrie)

    It was during the Advent season when the Dayton OCDS Community gathered together for the Rite of Making the Promise/Vows. The Spiritual Assistant of the community, Fr. John MacQuarrie, delivered a homily touching on many Carmelite themes.
    Since this also occurred on Gaudete Sunday , rejoicing in the Lord ,as spoken by St. Paul, was clearly on everyone’s mind.  In Romans, he says our salvation is closer than when we first accepted the faith. For those making promises and vows, they take those words to heart.
    Fr. MacQuarrie then shares the joyful account of the miraculous healing of little Benedicta McCarthy through the intercession of our dear Carmelite, St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, also known as Edith Stein.
    Finally, our attention is drawn to points of the Carmelite rule to apply to our everyday lives as well as our mission in Carmel. 
    In summary, we are all called to be a beacon of light to all around us, letting the light of Christ shine through us like a stained glass window.
     

    • 10 min
    Replay: The Christmas Grace and Epiphany of St. Therese of Lisieux

    Replay: The Christmas Grace and Epiphany of St. Therese of Lisieux

    This episode is a replay of a popular episode from 2017. St. Therese of Lisieux is a Giant Soul among the Saints being one of the Doctors of the Church. On this her birthday (Jan 2), Guest Marika Zimmerman and Host Frances Harry talk about her famous Christmas Conversion. We go into a great deal of in-depth discussion about this moment. What was the conversion all about? When did it occur? How did St. Therese describe this event about the “magic shoes” at Christmas? In what way can we peer into her mindset at this pivotal time? What were some of the results of the graces given? What are some of the lessons learned? How was the one-hour old Jesus magnified in the rest of her life? How may we imitate her trust and abandonment to the Lord?
     
    RESOURCES:Books:
    “The Story of a Soul” by St. Therese of Lisieux, Translated by John Clarke, OCD and Study Edition Prepared by Marc Foley, OCD; ICS Publications.
    “Therese, the Little Child of God’s Mercy: Her Spiritual Itinerary in the Light of Her Autobiographical Manuscripts” by Angel de les Gavarres; ICS Publications.
    “Everything is Grace: the Life and Way of Therese of Lisieux” by Joseph F. Schmidt, FSC; The Word Among Us Press.

    • 53 min
    “God, Be Yourself My Sanctity.” (Part 2)

    “God, Be Yourself My Sanctity.” (Part 2)

    In this presentation, Frances Harry, OCDS, speculates on what it looks like when God is our sanctity, especially as seen in the life and words of St. Therese of Lisieux.  It follows from part one of the same title which discussed this phrase which was used in St. Therese’s famous prayer, “Act of Oblation to Merciful Love.”  Through the example of St. Therese, we too, can imitate her and pray this prayer with all confidence. Resources: “Story of A Soul, Study Edition” by St. Therese of Lisieux, prepared by Marc Foley, OCD; ICS Publications. “Something New with Saint Therese:  Her Eucharistic Miracle” by Suzie Andres, OCDS;  Little Way Books. “Lessons from Saint Therese:  The Wisdom of God’s Little Flower” by John Paul Thomas; www.mycatholic.life Excerpt from St. Therese of Lisieux’s “Act of Oblation to Merciful Love”“O My God! Most Blessed Trinity, I desire to Love You and make You Loved, to work for the glory of Holy Church by saving souls on earth and liberating those suffering in purgatory. I desire to accomplish Your will perfectly and to reach the degree of glory You have prepared for me in Your Kingdom. I desire, in a word, to be a saint, but I feel my helplessness and I beg You, O my God! to be Yourself my Sanctity!” 

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

Runholy ,

Thank You

Thank you for giving a modern and practical framework for those drawn to the contemplative life, but not sure how to navigate in this age. I love Fire Within, Interior Castle, and St. John of the cross. Let me say, I am not catholic so imma little lost on some of these. But nevertheless, it has been the most helpful source I’ve been able to find to serve as a companion to the writings of this great man and woman of God.

AnyNameWillDo.... ,

Great content but sound quality lacking

Good sound quality makes the difference between the listener hearing and understanding, or becoming distracted and discouraged.

This content is very much needed in this day and age. I write to not be critical but to encourage your work in this podcast. Many blessings.

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