57 episodes

A podcast about the history of ancient Greece for people new to and familiar with Ancient Greek history.The Casting Through Ancient Greece podcast will focus on telling the story of Ancient Greece starting from the pre history through Archaic Greece, Classical Greece and up to the Hellenistic period. Featured throughout the podcast series will be Major events such as the Greek and Persian wars, The Peloponnesian war and Alexander the Greats war against Persia. www.castingthroughancientgreece.com for more resources and creditsSupport the series at www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreecefacebook: casting through ancient greeceTwitter: @casting_greece

Casting Through Ancient Greece Mark Selleck

    • History
    • 5.0 • 17 Ratings

A podcast about the history of ancient Greece for people new to and familiar with Ancient Greek history.The Casting Through Ancient Greece podcast will focus on telling the story of Ancient Greece starting from the pre history through Archaic Greece, Classical Greece and up to the Hellenistic period. Featured throughout the podcast series will be Major events such as the Greek and Persian wars, The Peloponnesian war and Alexander the Greats war against Persia. www.castingthroughancientgreece.com for more resources and creditsSupport the series at www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreecefacebook: casting through ancient greeceTwitter: @casting_greece

    44: Macedon, Balancing Interests

    44: Macedon, Balancing Interests

    The eve of the Greek and Persian wars would see a point in Macedonian history where the transition of power from one king to another would take place. This would see Amyntas after his rule since the mid 6th century pass power to his son Alexander the first at the opening of the 5th. This would take place on the backdrop of Persian advances into Thrace before Macedon would then begin engaging diplomatically.
    It becomes difficult to tell at what point Macedon would offer earth and water to the Persian empire, with colourful stories entering into the historical record. Though, by the time of the first invasion it seems Macedon had submitted in some form. The marriage of Alexanders sister to a Persian governor, also a relative of Xerxes would seem to indicate this.
    Alexander and his Macedonians would appear in Herodotus’ narrative a number of times as Xerxes invasion unfolded. They would be shown to provide assistance as the Persians marched through their lands, while also providing advice to the Greeks as they prepared to defend their lands, before and during battles. 
    Alexanders position during the invasions was a difficult one. He was a benefactor and friend of the Athenians, though he had also submitted to the Persians and expected to assist their campaign against the Greeks. This would see Alexander to play a delicate balancing game as the war unfolded, being careful to maintain his relationship with the Greeks, though also ensuring not to anger Xerxes and his obligations, or risk the ruin of his lands.

    This episodes book recommendation: Herodotus, The Histories (Translated by Tom Holland)


    Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreece)

    • 43 min
    Teaser: The Lelantine War (Patreon)

    Teaser: The Lelantine War (Patreon)

    This is a teaser of the bonus episode, The Lelantine War found over on Patreon.

    The Lelantine War is an obscure conflict to us today, thanks to the very limited sources focusing on this war. Though, what dose seem to come through in the various fragments, making reference to the conflict, is the grand scale this war would be waged on. The Lelantine War would be waged right at the beginning of the Archaic period in Greek lands, between Greek cities. Our sources placing its importance comparable to other great conflicts such as; the Trojan War, the Greco-Persian Wars and the Peloponnesian War. Though, unlike those conflicts, we are left to hypothesize to a greater degree thanks to the very limited information available.

    If you would like to hear more and support the series click on the Patreon link at the bottom of the page or you can head to my website to discover other ways to support the series, Here

    New bonus episodes and series updates come out in the first week of every month, 
    Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreece)

    • 7 min
    43: The Greek Periphery, Macedon

    43: The Greek Periphery, Macedon

    Many tribes existed throughout the Balkan region in the Neolithic to the Bronze Age where we would see defined cultures develop with the onset of the Iron Age. We hear origin stories and hints at the early Macedonians in Myth through Homer and Hesiod. We even get through Herodotus, the hint of a tribe called the Makednoi during the Bronze Age in the mountains north of Greece.
    The culture of the Macedonians that emerge in the Archaic Age and into the Classical Age, would seem to be the result of many migrations that had been filtering south into Greek lands as well as other locations. These migrations would be seen to have peoples with Indo-European roots consistently moving through much of the Balkans through many generations, help spread a common root language and ideas.
    It wouldn’t be until Herodotus that we start to hear about the origins of the Macedonian dynasty, the Argead, develop. Although this was some 250 years after the foundation of the kingdom of Macedon, it appears to be the official account coming from the Macedonia court. This traditional telling would see the Argeads being descendants of Heracles and coming from the city of Argos down on the Peloponnese.
    The kingdom established, rule in Macedon appears to be somewhat stable with dates of the various kings being very respectable lengths. During these generations the territory of the Macedonians would expand out of the Pierian Mountains, north of Mount Olympus. By the opening of the Greek and Persian Wars and under the 7th King Alexander I, they would control lands along the coast of the Pierian Mountains, the coastal plains around the Thermaic Gulf and north across the Haliacmon River. 
    Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreece)

    • 37 min
    Teaser: Mycenaean Aftermath (Patreon)

    Teaser: Mycenaean Aftermath (Patreon)

    This is a teaser of the bonus episode, Mycenaean Aftermath found over on Patreon.

    Having looked at some of the explanations for the Mycenaeans collapse at the end of the Bronze Age, we now turn to questions around what happened to them and where did they go. We look at what was taking place in Greek lands in the wake of the collapse, while also turning to areas across the Mediterranean.

    If you would like to hear more and support the series click on the Patreon link at the bottom of the page or you can head to my website to discover other ways to support the series, Here

    New bonus episodes and series updates come out in the first week of every month, 
    Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreece)

    • 9 min
    42: Thrace, Crossroads of Campaigns

    42: Thrace, Crossroads of Campaigns

    Greek and Roman writers would highlight the Thracians as some of the best mercenaries fielded in foreign armies from the mid-5th century and beyond. They would excel at hit and run tactics, harassing heavier troops and being able to defend difficult ground. This reputation would appear to be born out of their tradition of Homeric style warfare practiced in their own lands. Though we get no detailed accounts of how they fought against one another in their home territories. 
    Our knowledge of the Thracians in war during the 6th and early 5th centuries comes to us thanks to account revolving around the Greek and Persian wars found in the Histories written by Herodotus. This would see their history during this period told through the context of various Persian campaigns through their lands, therefore lacking the details of how they fought, though we can get an idea from their reputation as warriors in later histories.
    Thracian lands would become a crossroads for Persian campaigns during the close of the 6th and opening of the 5th centuries BC. Initially Persia would attempt to expand north into Scythian lands, where a path through Thracian lands would need to be secured. Though the hold in Thrace during this period would only stay intact as long as a sizable occupying force was present. After the Scythian campaign continued attempts would be made to secure the regions close to the Persian Empires frontiers with mixed results.
    The most successful period of Persian control would come during the lead up to and during the Greek and Persian Wars. A sizable Persian force would secure lands in Thrace and Macedonian paving a way forward to Greece. The Persians held enough control in Thracian coastal regions to construct their monumental engineering feats to prepare for Xerxes invasion. Though, with the ultimate Persian defeat in Greece, Thrace would once again become very inhospitable to Persians within their lands.   
    Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreece)

    • 37 min
    41: The Greek Periphery, Thrace

    41: The Greek Periphery, Thrace

    North East of Greece would be a land seen as wild and untamed stretching from the modern-day nation of Hungary to the Ukraine, and then to the Black Sea and Aegean. The Greeks would view the people that inhabited these lands as barbarians, much the same way they did to other cultures that differed from theirs. Though these people that they would call the Thracians, seemed that much more uncivilised compared to the other barbarians they had encountered.
    Although the Greeks would call them Thracian, a united people they were not. these people would be a lose collection of tribes with a shared common culture. Herodotus would say of the Thracians; “If they could all be united under one ruler and think the same way, they would, in my opinion, be the most invincible and strongest of all nations. But that is impossible; it will never happen, since their weakness I that they are incapable of uniting and agreeing.”
    The Thracians would be a result of earlier Neolithic cultures that had formed in the Balkans thousands of years earlier. The Thracian identity that would come to describe their shared culture would be a result of these indigenous Balkan cultures interacting with the numerous Indo-European migrations that would take place as the Bronze Age developed.
    Thrace would enter into the Greeks memory as far back as the Trojan War through Homers epic poem the Iliad. Though it wouldn’t be until the 7th and 6th centuries where Thrace would truly enter the Greek periphery. Greek colonies would begin to dot the Thracian coast lines, where trade of goods and ideas would take place in both times of peace and times of tension. 
    Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/castingthroughancientgreece)

    • 35 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

Taff 79 ,

Great podcast!

Great podcast. Fun and well made!

Antigonus the One-Eyed ,

Very good!

Mark does a very good job of tying everything together. For anyone interested in Ancient Greece, or the Eastern Mediterranean and Near East in general, I highly recommend his show.

Bjartur108 ,

Good start

Excited to hear more! I’ve been wanting to learn more about Ancient Greek history and especially archaeology

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