53 episodes

Tufts University and Shareable.net present Cities@Tufts, a free series exploring community innovations in urban planning. The live discussions are moderated by professor Julian Agyeman and the podcast is hosted by Shareable's Tom Llewellyn.

The sessions will focus on topics such as Environmental justice vs White Supremacy in the 21st century; Sacred Civics: What would it mean to build seven generation cities; Organizing for Food Sovereignty; From Spatializing Culture to Social Justice and Public Space; Exploring Invisible Women Syndrome; The Introduction of Street Trees in Boston and New York; Design principles for the urban commons; and The Past, Present, and Future State of Cities.

Cities@Tufts Lectures Shareable

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 6 Ratings

Tufts University and Shareable.net present Cities@Tufts, a free series exploring community innovations in urban planning. The live discussions are moderated by professor Julian Agyeman and the podcast is hosted by Shareable's Tom Llewellyn.

The sessions will focus on topics such as Environmental justice vs White Supremacy in the 21st century; Sacred Civics: What would it mean to build seven generation cities; Organizing for Food Sovereignty; From Spatializing Culture to Social Justice and Public Space; Exploring Invisible Women Syndrome; The Introduction of Street Trees in Boston and New York; Design principles for the urban commons; and The Past, Present, and Future State of Cities.

    Architects Without Frontiers: A Journey from Divided Cities to Zones of Fragility with Professor Esther Charlesworth

    Architects Without Frontiers: A Journey from Divided Cities to Zones of Fragility with Professor Esther Charlesworth

    Professor Esther Charlesworth’s talk for the Boston Salon on May 1, 2024 focused on her nomadic design journey across the last three decades. In trying to move from just theorizing about disaster architecture to designing and delivering projects for at-risk communities globally, Esther started both Architects Without Frontiers (Australia) and ASF (International); an umbrella coalition of 41 other architect groups across Europe, Asia and Africa. Architects Without Frontiers asks, how do we go from just pontificating about the multiple and intractable challenges of our fragile planet, to actually acting on them?
    Prof. Esther Charlesworth works in the School of Architecture and Design at RMIT University, where in 2016 she founded the Master of Disaster, Design, and Development degree [MoDDD] and the Humanitarian Architecture Research Bureau [HARB]. MoDDD is one of the few degrees globally, enabling mid-career designers to transition their careers into the international development, disaster and urban resilience sectors.
    In addition to this audio, you can watch the video and read the full transcript of their conversation on Shareable.net – while you’re there get caught up on past lectures.
    Cities@Tufts Lectures explores the impact of urban planning on our communities and the opportunities to design for greater equity and justice with professor Julian Agyeman. 
    Cities@Tufts Lectures is produced by Tufts University and Shareable.net with support from Barr Foundation and SHIFT Foundation.
    Lectures are moderated by Professor Julian Agyeman and organized in partnership with research assistants Deandra Boyle and Grant Perry. Paige Kelly is our co-producer and audio editor, the original portrait of Karin Bradley was illustrated by Anke Dregnet, and the series is co-produced and hosted by Tom Llewellyn. 
    “Light Without Dark” by Cultivate Beats is our theme song.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Consuming the Creative City: Gastrodevelopment in a UNESCO Creative City of Gastronomy with Eden Kinkaid

    Consuming the Creative City: Gastrodevelopment in a UNESCO Creative City of Gastronomy with Eden Kinkaid

    Scholars have recently coined the term “gastrodevelopment” to refer to the leveraging of food culture as a resource and strategy of economic development. Drawing on a case study of Tucson, Arizona – the United States’ first UNESCO Creative City of Gastronomy – Kinkaid uses the lens of gastrodevelopment to examine how food culture is transformed into a form of symbolic capital that animates a broader project of urban development. Kinkaid shows how this transformation encodes differentials of value that are racialized and racializing and risk contributing to Tucson’s uneven urban geographies. Kinkaid then turns to community visions of food-based development to imagine alternative trajectories for the project of gastrodevelopment.
    Dr. Eden Kinkaid (they/them) is a human geographer and social scientist whose work focuses on themes of sustainable and equitable food and agricultural systems, place, race, and development. They have researched these themes in north India and in the U.S. Southwest. In addition to this line of research, they publish on topics of feminist, queer, and trans geographies, geographic theory, creative geographies, and diversity, equity, and inclusion in academia. Their work has been published in Urban Geography, Progress in Human Geography, Transactions of the British Institute of Geographers, The Annals of the American Association of Geographers, Environment and Planning D, and various other journals and books. Eden has served as an editor at Gender, Place, and Culture, The Graduate Journal of Food Studies, and you are here: the journal of creative geography. You can learn more about their work on their website or by following them on social media @queergeog on Twitter, Instagram, and Bluesky.
    In addition to this audio, you can watch the video and read the full transcript of their conversation on Shareable.net – while you’re there get caught up on past lectures.
    Cities@Tufts Lectures explores the impact of urban planning on our communities and the opportunities to design for greater equity and justice with professor Julian Agyeman. 
    Cities@Tufts Lectures is produced by Tufts University and Shareable.net with support from Barr Foundation and SHIFT Foundation.
    Lectures are moderated by Professor Julian Agyeman and organized in partnership with research assistants Deandra Boyle and Grant Perry. Paige Kelly is our co-producer and audio editor, the original portrait of Karin Bradley was illustrated by Anke Dregnet, and the series is co-produced and hosted by Tom Llewellyn. 
    “Light Without Dark” by Cultivate Beats is our theme song.

    • 49 min
    How Local Governments Can Work with Grassroots Initiatives for Sustainability Transitions

    How Local Governments Can Work with Grassroots Initiatives for Sustainability Transitions

    In cities across the world grassroots initiatives organize alternative forms of provisioning, e.g. food sharing networks, energy cooperatives and repair cafés. Some of these are recognized by local governments as engines in sustainability transitions. In this talk, I will discuss different ways that local governments interact with, and use, such grassroots initiatives, drawing from case studies in Berlin and Gothenburg. An argument will be made for that we need to reconsider what municipal infrastructure should entail, i.e. not only the traditional infrastructure for transport and waste but also new infrastructure for repairing and sharing.
    Karin Bradley is Professor of Urban and Regional Studies at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. Her research concerns planning and policy for sustainability transitions, the role of civil society, alternative economies and justice aspects of transitions. She has been the co-director of the eight-year research programme Mistra Sustainable Consumption – from niche to mainstream that engages researchers from different disciplines as well as municipalities, civil society organizations, companies and national authorities in Sweden. She has had several assignments for the Swedish government, including leading a public inquiry on the sharing economy.
    In addition to this audio, you can watch the video and read the full transcript of their conversation on Shareable.net – while you’re there get caught up on past lectures.
    Cities@Tufts Lectures explores the impact of urban planning on our communities and the opportunities to design for greater equity and justice with professor Julian Agyeman. 
    Cities@Tufts Lectures is produced by Tufts University and Shareable.net with support from Barr Foundation and SHIFT Foundation.
    Lectures are moderated by Professor Julian Agyeman and organized in partnership with research assistants Deandra Boyle and Grant Perry. Paige Kelly is our co-producer and audio editor, the original portrait of Karin Bradley was illustrated by Anke Dregnet, and the series is co-produced and hosted by Tom Llewellyn. 
    “Light Without Dark” by Cultivate Beats is our theme song.

    • 48 min
    Reciprocal Relations: The Coevolution Between Planning and Constitutional Rights: The Case of London with Orwa Switat

    Reciprocal Relations: The Coevolution Between Planning and Constitutional Rights: The Case of London with Orwa Switat

    Minorities in cities worldwide confront disparities, advocating for rights within a dynamic interplay of urban planning and constitutional legal frameworks. How does the coevolution between planning and legal frameworks shape the status of minorities? 
    This lecture will dissect the coevolution of British constitutional rights and the status of minorities in the urban planning of London, post-WWII. It will explore how planning practices embed minority rights, shedding light on the transformation of political and legal frameworks into urban planning, and assessing their impact on state-minority relations.
    Orwa Switat is a visiting scholar at the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University. He is a scholar, practitioner, and activist in the realm of state-minority relations in urban planning. He holds a Ph.D. and M.Sc. degrees from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. His research has critically examined the intersections of urban planning and state-minority relations. Complementing his advanced degrees, he possesses BAs in both Philosophy and Political Science from Haifa University. 
    In addition to his scholarly pursuits, Orwa has dedicated his work to promoting the rights of Palestinian communities in Israel in the context of planning, advising planners and civil society on spatial justice and inclusion. From 2019 to 2023, Orwa served on Haifa's municipal committee for historical preservation, influencing policies to honor and reflect the Arab Palestinian Heritage of the city.
    In addition to this audio, you can watch the video and read the full transcript of their conversation on Shareable.net – while you’re there get caught up on past lectures.
    Cities@Tufts Lectures explores the impact of urban planning on our communities and the opportunities to design for greater equity and justice with professor Julian Agyeman. 
    Cities@Tufts Lectures is produced by Tufts University and Shareable.net with support from Barr Foundation and SHIFT Foundation.
    Lectures are moderated by Professor Julian Agyeman and organized in partnership with research assistants Deandra Boyle and Muram Bacare. Paige Kelly is our co-producer and audio editor, the original portrait of Mark Roseland was illustrated by Anke Dregnet, and the series is co-produced and hosted by Tom Llewellyn. 
    “Light Without Dark” by Cultivate Beats is our theme song.

    • 54 min
    Advancing Urban Planning with the Community Capital Compass with Mark Roseland

    Advancing Urban Planning with the Community Capital Compass with Mark Roseland

    Contemporary planning approaches often fall short in addressing the cascading environmental, economic, and social issues planners and their communities face. Planners need comprehensive, forward-thinking approaches that prioritize sustainability, equity, and inclusivity.
    Mark Roseland’s new book, Toward Sustainable Communities: Solutions for Citizens and Their Governments, is the definitive guide to the why, the what, and most importantly, the how of creating resilient, healthy, equitable, and prosperous places.
    Dr. Roseland will introduce the book’s innovative Community Capital Compass as a powerful tool for maximizing the environmental, economic, and social benefits of complex community and regional decisions. The Compass promises a transformative, equitable, resilient, and sustainable approach to urban development.
    In addition to this audio, you can watch the video and read the full transcript of their conversation on Shareable.net – while you’re there get caught up on past lectures.
    Cities@Tufts Lectures explores the impact of urban planning on our communities and the opportunities to design for greater equity and justice with professor Julian Agyeman. 
    Cities@Tufts Lectures is produced by Tufts University and Shareable.net with support from Barr Foundation and SHIFT Foundation.
    Lectures are moderated by Professor Julian Agyeman and organized in partnership with research assistants Deandra Boyle and Muram Bacare. Paige Kelly is our co-producer and audio editor, the original portrait of Mark Roseland was illustrated by Anke Dregnet, and the series is co-produced and hosted by Tom Llewellyn. 
    “Light Without Dark” by Cultivate Beats is our theme song.

    • 52 min
    How to Fight a Mega-Jail with Maya Singhal

    How to Fight a Mega-Jail with Maya Singhal

    In 2017, New York City committed to a plan to close Rikers Island Jail Complex and build four smaller jails around the city in Manhattan’s Chinatown, Downtown Brooklyn, Mott Haven in the Bronx, and Kew Gardens in Queens. The Chinatown jail is planned to be built on the site of the current jail in the neighborhood, but rather than repurposing or remodeling the building, the city plans to demolish it and build a 300-foot mega-jail, which would be the tallest jail in the world. The fight against the new Chinatown jail has drawn together a diverse coalition concerned about the effects of the jail on the Chinatown population and the predominantly Black and Latine populations incarcerated inside it. This episode of Cities@Tufts explores how concerned groups are working to bridge their differences and develop strategies to fight the new jail construction.
    In addition to this audio, you can watch the video and read the full transcript of their conversation on Shareable.net – while you’re there get caught up on past lectures.
    Cities@Tufts Lectures explores the impact of urban planning on our communities and the opportunities to design for greater equity and justice with professor Julian Agyeman. 
    Cities@Tufts Lectures is produced by Tufts University and Shareable.net with support from Barr Foundation and SHIFT Foundation.
    Lectures are moderated by Professor Julian Agyeman and organized in partnership with research assistants Deandra Boyle and Muram Bacare. Paige Kelly is our co-producer and audio editor, the original portrait of Maya Singhal was illustrated by Anke Dregnet, and the series is co-produced and hosted by Tom Llewellyn. 
    “Light Without Dark” by Cultivate Beats is our theme song.

    • 51 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Thomas Clever ,

A very provocative show

Can community gardens actually lead to gentrification and White Supremacy?
I never would have thought so until listening to Cities@Tufts.

I’m looking forward to what they discuss in the future.

Della Z Duncan ,

Important Topic and Great Team

Looking forward to more of this awesome podcast - great theme and excellent team :)

Top Podcasts In Education

The Mel Robbins Podcast
Mel Robbins
The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson
Mick Unplugged
Mick Hunt
جافکری | Jafekri
Amirali Gh
Law of Attraction SECRETS
Natasha Graziano
School Business Insider
John Brucato

You Might Also Like