100 episodes

Connected Social Media works with the world's most innovative companies to tell the stories behind their press releases and their products. Whether you're a blogger, a journalist, an investor or an engaged consumer, you'll get valuable insights and information from the people behind the people behind the projects that drive modern life - everything from microchips to microfinance, from IT best practices to disaster recovery, from cloud computing to data center security. Brilliant, hard-working and dedicated executives, engineers, analysts and entrepreneurs are telling their stories using an ever-increasing toolbox. One of the most exciting developments in recent years is the ability to participate in the dialogue with the companies that are constantly revolutionizing our reality. Join the conversation at ConnectedSocialMedia.com.

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Connected Social Media works with the world's most innovative companies to tell the stories behind their press releases and their products. Whether you're a blogger, a journalist, an investor or an engaged consumer, you'll get valuable insights and information from the people behind the people behind the projects that drive modern life - everything from microchips to microfinance, from IT best practices to disaster recovery, from cloud computing to data center security. Brilliant, hard-working and dedicated executives, engineers, analysts and entrepreneurs are telling their stories using an ever-increasing toolbox. One of the most exciting developments in recent years is the ability to participate in the dialogue with the companies that are constantly revolutionizing our reality. Join the conversation at ConnectedSocialMedia.com.

    Business Group on Health: Overcoming the Addiction Crisis

    Business Group on Health: Overcoming the Addiction Crisis

    One of the many tragedies of the COVID-19 pandemic is its impact on those struggling with substance use disorders. Overdose deaths in the U.S. are estimated to reach an all-time high in 2020, likely driven by stress, isolation and decreased access to needed treatment and services. But amidst this devastating crisis there is hope, as we have the tools needed to reverse this trend. In this episode of the Business Group on Health podcast, we speak with Gary Mendell about how we can overcome the addiction crisis, including the importance of reducing stigma and improving access to high-quality treatment.

    IT@Intel: Building a Modern, Scalable Cyber Intelligence Platform with Apache Kafka

    IT@Intel: Building a Modern, Scalable Cyber Intelligence Platform with Apache Kafka

    IT Best Practices: Advanced cyber threats continue to increase in frequency and sophistication, threatening computing environments and impacting businesses’ ability to grow. More than ever, large enterprises must invest in effective information security, using technologies that improve detection and response times. At Intel, we are transforming from our legacy cybersecurity systems to a modern, scalable Cyber Intelligence Platform (CIP) based on Kafka and Splunk. In our 2019 paper, Transforming Intel’s Security Posture with Innovations in Data Intelligence, we discussed the data lake, monitoring, and security capabilities of Splunk. This paper describes the essential role Apache Kafka plays in our CIP and its key benefits. Apache Kafka is the foundation of our CIP architecture. We achieve economies of scale as we acquire data once and consume it many times. Simplified connection of data sources helps reduce our technical debt, while filtering data helps reduce costs to downstream systems. Intel vice president and Chief Information Security Officer, Brent Conran, explains, “Kafka helps us produce contextually rich data for both IT and our business units. Kafka also enables us to deploy more advanced techniques in-stream, such as machine-learning models that analyze data and produce new insights. This helps us reduce mean time to detect and respond; it also helps decrease the need for human touch. Kafka technology, combined with Confluent’s enterprise features and high-performance Intel architecture, support our mission to make it safe for Intel to go fast.”

    Protecting Against DDoS Attacks with Hardware and Software Solutions – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 215

    Protecting Against DDoS Attacks with Hardware and Software Solutions – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 215

    In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Henry Tam, Senior Product Manager at F5, joins host Jake Smith to talk about the growing transition to virtualized environments, F5’s history in traffic management, the future of 5G and edge computing, and why the company is leveraging new solutions to offload DDoS mitigation from a virtual firewall to a high-performance FPGA developed with Intel. Follow F5 on Twitter: twitter.com/F5 Follow Jake on Twitter: twitter.com/jakesmithintel

    Inside Intel Labs: Human and AI Collaboration – Intel on AI – Season 2, Episode 10

    Inside Intel Labs: Human and AI Collaboration – Intel on AI – Season 2, Episode 10

    In this episode of Intel on AI guests Lama Nachman, Intel Fellow and Director of Anticipatory Computing Lab, and Hanlin Tang, Sr. Director of the Intel AI Lab, talk with host Abigail Hing Wen about the intersection of humans and AI. The three discuss a wide range of topics, from keeping humans in the loop of AI systems to the ways that AI can augment human abilities. Lama talks about her work in building assistive computer systems for Prof. Stephen Hawking and British roboticist Dr. Peter Scott-Morgan. Hanlin reveals work on a DARPA program in collaboration with Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital that’s trying to restore the ability of patients with spinal cord injury to walk again. Follow Intel AI Research on Twitter: twitter.com/intelairesearch Follow Hanlin on Twitter: twitter.com/hanlintang Follow Abigail on Twitter at: twitter.com/abigailhingwen Learn more about the Intel’s global research at: intel.com/labs

    From the Creators of Thanos: The Making of a Virtual Human – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 9

    From the Creators of Thanos: The Making of a Virtual Human – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 9

    In this Intel on AI podcast episode: guest Doug Roble, the senior director of software research and development at Digital Domain, joins hosts Abigail Hing Wen and Amir Khosrowshahi to talk about how Digital Domain creates virtual effects for blockbuster movies. Doug, Abigail, and Amir discuss how Digital Domain developed virtual characters for Brad Pitt in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Josh Brolin in Avengers: Endgame, the technology and AI models that go into creating such complex visuals, and the virtual humans the company is working on today. To see the latest digital humans the company is developing, watch this YouTube video at: youtu.be/RKiGfGQxqaQs. Follow Digital Domain on Twitter at: twitter.com/digitaldomaindd Follow Abigail on Twitter at: twitter.com/abigailhingwen Learn more about the future of AI at: intel.com/ai

    Tech Tonics: Dr. Sally Shaywitz: Advancing Science, Driving Policy, Overcoming Dyslexia

    Tech Tonics: Dr. Sally Shaywitz: Advancing Science, Driving Policy, Overcoming Dyslexia

    Dr. Sally Shaywitz – Yes, she is David’s mom – has brought an entrepreneur’s mindset to her life’s work in dyslexia, recognizing the condition as a prevalent and underappreciated need, then working tirelessly to advance the science and enact the policy required to fully unlock the potential within so many brilliant individuals.  Sally has helped a huge array of individuals access what she has famously termed their “sea of strengths”. The daughter of two immigrants who had escaped Eastern Europe at the turn of the century and arrived in America in search of a better life, Sally was born and grew up up in the Bronx, New York. The family wasn’t well-off: her father was a dressmaker, her mom, a homemaker. Yet she describes her childhood, with her parents and older sister, Irene, as “overflowing with love.” Sally attended college at the City College of New York (CCNY), and after initially contemplating a career in law, found herself drawn to medicine, and was accepted early into the medical school of her choice, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Tragically, the same year, Sally’s mom was afflicted with endometrial cancer, and despite what initially seemed like an encouraging prognosis, she grew progressively ill and ultimately passed away, a particularly devastating experience given the family’s especially close emotional bonds. While entering medical school with a heavy heart, Sally soon found she resonated with what she describes as the humanity and warmth of medicine; she was especially drawn to pediatrics, pursuing it herself and marrying a pediatrician, Bennett Shaywitz, she met the summer after her first year of medical school. While Sally was one of only four women in a class of 100, she generally found the men to be far friendlier; similarly, during her pediatrics training. When she wanted to organize her schedule so she could take time off to be with her first child, it was her female colleagues, she said, who resisted and rejected the idea. After completing her training in pediatrics and a fellowship in developmental pediatrics, Sally and her family – now with three children – moved to Dayton, OH, where her husband had been assigned by the Air Force to run a research center during the Vietnam War. Sally decided she wanted to focus on her children, and put her career on hold. She loved the experience, and wrote about it for the New York Times Sunday Magazine, focusing on the contrast between, as she describes it, what “enlightened women” were taught about motherhood and how, in her experience, it was so much more instinctive, positive and fulfilling. The family subsequently relocated to suburban Connecticut after Bennett accepted a position at Yale Medical School. Sally says she initially planned to be a stay-at-home mom, but found the available social environment intellectually deadening. She began to see patients out of her home – an experience she wrote up for Ms. Magazine – and was soon recruited by Yale to care for the learning disorder patients that apparently no one else was interested in seeing. The field was viewed at the time as a bit of a backwater (the starting point of so many entrepreneurial journeys!), but Sally found she really enjoyed taking care of patients with dyslexia, and was determined to drive their care forward. This mission would come to define Sally’s career (and soon, Bennett’s as well, as they began to work as a team), starting with a transformative longitudinal study (now in its 37th year, and counting!) that evolved into an extensive clinical research program. Their research revealed that dyslexia was surprisingly common – affecting about 20% of the population – and that it doesn’t spontaneously regress with age. Sally developed what’s now commonly called the “sea of strengths” model, which describes dyslexia as a localized deficit in t

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