1,202 episodes

The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with Consider This+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/considerthis

Consider This from NPR Consider This

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The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with Consider This+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/considerthis

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    Boredom Followed By Unexpected Tragedy: A Ukrainian Soldier's Life At War

    Boredom Followed By Unexpected Tragedy: A Ukrainian Soldier's Life At War

    Quote – "The fight is here; I need ammunition, not a ride." That statement, from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to the U-S Embassy, came two days after Russian missiles began raining down on his country two years ago.

    After weeks of speculation and warnings Russian President Vladimir Putin had declared war.

    Fueled by grit, patriotism and billions of dollars from the US, Ukraine has waged a fight no one expected they could. But nearly two years in that could be changing.

    US aid is stuck in Congress. This week, Russian forces captured their first city in 9 months. And that plea Zelensky made for ammunition in February 2022 – he's still making it.

    Ukraine has waged a war against Russia that has exceeded expectations. Can it continue to stand up to Russia if western aid doesn't come through?

    We get the view from the battlefield from a Ukrainian writer turned soldier.

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    • 11 min
    Wind Power Is Taking Over A West Virginia Coal Town. Will The Residents Embrace It?

    Wind Power Is Taking Over A West Virginia Coal Town. Will The Residents Embrace It?

    Keyser, West Virginia, was once known for coal. But the jobs have been disappearing. First because of automation, then cheap natural gas. And now, the urgency to address climate change is one more pressure on this energy source that contributes to global warming.

    Now the town, like so much of the country is attempting to transition to renewable energy. The country's first major climate policy, known as the Inflation Reduction Act, gave that transition a boost. It passed with the key vote of West Virginia's own Senator Democrat Joe Manchin.

    Keyser represents a national shift in American energy production. And in a town that was defined by coal for generations, change can be difficult.

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    • 13 min
    Does Portugal Have The Answer To Stopping Drug Overdose Deaths?

    Does Portugal Have The Answer To Stopping Drug Overdose Deaths?

    Brian Mann covers the U-S opioid and fentanyl crisis for NPR. That means he talks to a lot of people struggling with addiction. Again and again, he's heard stories of people who have succumbed to their addiction — last year 112, 000 — more than ever in history.

    But when Mann traveled to Portugal to report on that country's model for dealing with the opioid crisis, he heard a very different story. Overdose deaths in Portugal are extremely rare.

    The country has taken a radically different approach to drugs – decriminalizing small amounts and publicly funding addiction services – including sites where people can use drugs like crack and heroin.

    Portugal treats addiction as an illness rather than a crime. No one has to pay for addiction care, and no one scrambles to navigate a poorly regulated recovery system. Could Portugal's approach help the U-S fight its opioid epidemic?

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    • 10 min
    What Navalny's Death Means For The Russian Opposition

    What Navalny's Death Means For The Russian Opposition

    Much of the world has spent the weekend mourning Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. And asking why he chose to return to Russia, after he'd been poisoned, and when it was clear he was in danger.

    Filmmaker Daniel Roher, who interviewed Navalny for the Oscar-winning documentary "Navalny," says the Russian opposition leader was an incredibly optimistic and certain about himself and his mission. And that Navalny believed he could usher in a brighter future for Russia.

    So what happens to that future now? Aleksei Miniailo an opposition activist and researcher in Moscow weighs in on how the Russian opposition sustains its movement after the death of its most prominent figure.

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    • 9 min
    A Second Wind For Wind Power?

    A Second Wind For Wind Power?

    About two years ago, New Jersey's Democratic Governor Phil Murphy said that the state would be partnering with the Danish company Orsted, the largest developer of offshore wind projects in the world.

    The company had agreed to build Ocean Wind 1, the state's first offshore wind farm, powering half a million homes and creating thousands of jobs in the process.

    The following year, Orsted inked another deal with the state for Ocean Wind 2, a second offshore wind farm with similar capacity. After years of review, the projects were approved in summer 2023. Construction of the first turbines was slated to begin in the fall.

    And then Orsted backed out, cancelling the contracts full stop.

    Despite the setbacks, Murphy is still all-in on wind. A month after Orsted dropped out, Murphy directed the state's Board of Public Utilities to seek new bids from offshore wind developers. And the state just approved two new offshore wind contracts.

    After several setbacks, could this mean a second wind for offshore wind?

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    • 11 min
    Rents Take A Big Bite

    Rents Take A Big Bite

    Rent has skyrocketed in the United States. That means Americans are handing over a bigger portion of their paycheck to their housing costs. They have less money for things like food, electricity, and commuting.

    The pandemic and inflation have both played a role in pushing rents higher.

    Whitney Airgood-Obrycki a Senior Research Associate at Harvard's Joint Center on Housing Studies says rents are actually going down, but that increases have been so large it's going to take time for the market to even out.

    We look at how rent prices got so high and what it might take to bring them down.

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    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
5K Ratings

5K Ratings

Mr. Clever ,

Daily news that’s deeper than Up First

If you like Up First, you’ll like this one. It goes deeper into a single topic of the day, but still gives you the info you need in under 15 minutes. Great hosts and great reporting.

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Too many ads for the length of the show

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Ads in the Plus version

I paid the fee for the plus version of this podcast, and yet I heard a Capital One ad, in the Plus version. Is NPR following in Amazon’s footsteps, in which paying the extortion fee doesn’t kill the ads?

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