34 episodes

Since 1998, The Contaminated Site Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN) website has presented Internet Seminars covering a wide variety of technical topics related to hazardous waste characterization, monitoring, and remediation. For each seminar topic, we have selected the highest-quality offering for placement in our archives. Beginning in May 2005, we began offering these archives via podcast, and this feed contains all seminars archived in the last 6 months. For a complete list of seminars archived since 2000 and videos of selected seminars archived since 2012, please visit http://clu-in.org/live/archive/. Our Rehabilitation Act Notice for reasonable accommodation is available at http://clu-in.org/training/accommodation.cfm. CLU-IN was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) but is intended as a forum for all waste remediation stakeholders. For more information and to view upcoming live offerings, please visit http://clu-in.org/live/. For a complete list of RSS feeds available on CLU-IN, please visit http://clu-in.org/rss/about/.

Contaminated Site Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN): Internet Seminar Audio Archives Contaminated Site Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN)

    • Science
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Since 1998, The Contaminated Site Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN) website has presented Internet Seminars covering a wide variety of technical topics related to hazardous waste characterization, monitoring, and remediation. For each seminar topic, we have selected the highest-quality offering for placement in our archives. Beginning in May 2005, we began offering these archives via podcast, and this feed contains all seminars archived in the last 6 months. For a complete list of seminars archived since 2000 and videos of selected seminars archived since 2012, please visit http://clu-in.org/live/archive/. Our Rehabilitation Act Notice for reasonable accommodation is available at http://clu-in.org/training/accommodation.cfm. CLU-IN was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) but is intended as a forum for all waste remediation stakeholders. For more information and to view upcoming live offerings, please visit http://clu-in.org/live/. For a complete list of RSS feeds available on CLU-IN, please visit http://clu-in.org/rss/about/.

    Audio for "U.S. EPA Superfund Remedial Program's Approach for Risk Harmonization when addressing Chemical and Radioactive Contamination at Sites," May 22, 2024

    Audio for "U.S. EPA Superfund Remedial Program's Approach for Risk Harmonization when addressing Chemical and Radioactive Contamination at Sites," May 22, 2024

    To help meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program's mandate to protect human health and the environment from current and potential threats posed by uncontrolled hazardous substance (both radiological and non-radiological), pollutant, or contaminant releases, the Superfund program has developed a human health evaluation process as part of its remedial response program. The process of gathering and assessing human health risk information is adapted from well-established chemical risk assessment principles and procedures. Within the Superfund remediation framework, radioactive contamination is dealt with in a consistent manner as with chemical contamination, except to account for the technical differences between radionuclides and chemicals. This consistency is important since at every radioactively contaminated site being addressed under Superfund's primary program for long-term cleanup, the National Priorities List (NPL), chemical contamination is also present. To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/remedial-radrisk_052224/

    Audio for "ITRC Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) Identification Framework," May 21, 2024

    Audio for "ITRC Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) Identification Framework," May 21, 2024

    In 2023, the ITRC Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) Framework was published to help environmental regulatory agencies and other stakeholders identify, evaluate, and manage CEC's while acknowledging uncertainties in their environmental fate and transport, receptor exposure, and/or toxicity. Such an approach can be conducive to improved allocation of regulatory response resources and provide a foundation for communicating potential risk to stakeholders. The ITRC framework is comprised of a white paper and four associated fact sheets. In the white paper, CEC are defined as: "substances and microorganisms including physical, chemical, biological, or radiological materials known or anticipated in the environment, that may pose newly identified risks to human health or the environment." The framework is meant to help environmental regulatory agencies and other stakeholders by providing examples of CEC monitoring programs and guiding the user through the process of identifying CEC key characteristics, how to communicate real and perceived risk from CEC to the public, and how laboratory analytical methods can be used in the identification process.The ITRC CEC training presents this entirely new framework for identification, prioritization, and communication of CEC. This course includes the following topics:An overview of the framework, how and why it was developed, the factors that influence the creation of CEC management units at the state level, and a listing of existing CEC monitoring programs.A discussion of key variables that may be used as criteria to identify and prioritize CEC for response actions. This portion of the course includes a case study that illustrates how the identification and prioritization process works with an "unknown" chemical CEC.Practices and methods for stakeholder messaging and how to share incomplete information on CEC that could impact human health and the environment. This portion of the short course builds upon the ITRC Risk Communication Toolkit by providing additional detail addresses communications plans, message maps, and audience identification.A paradigm for how laboratory methods can be used to identify CEC ranging from: "Is compound X in the sample and at what concentration?" (i.e., known knowns) to"Which compounds from the list are in this sample?" (i.e., known unknowns) to"What is in the sample?" (i.e., unknown unknowns). CEC are typically compounds or substances whose occurrence or effect is unknown but may or may not be understood through similar compounds or substances. This module includes a discussion of the use of targeted and untargeted analysis to identify a CEC.Participants will learn the elements of the CEC framework and gain an understanding of the framework application from case studies. Participants are encouraged to review the ITRC CEC Framework prior to the class. To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/CEC_052124/

    Audio for "Optimizing Injection Strategies and In situ Remediation Performance," May 16, 2024

    Audio for "Optimizing Injection Strategies and In situ Remediation Performance," May 16, 2024

    In 2020, ITRC recognized that In situ remediation technologies using amendment injections have advanced to mainstream acceptance and offer a competitive advantage over many forms of ex situ treatment of soil and groundwater. Developing a detailed site-specific strategy is absolutely critical to the success of such in situ remedies. These strategies include conducting a thorough site characterization that will allow development of a detailed Conceptual Site Model (CSM) to guide critical analysis of subsurface features and improving remediation effectiveness. In the interest of developing expedited solutions, many past in situ remediation projects have been executed based on an incomplete understanding of the hydrogeology, geology, and contaminant distribution and mass. Some of these sites have undergone multiple rounds of in situ injections but have not advanced to closure. Better strategies and minimum design standards are required to decrease uncertainty and improve remedy effectiveness.

    In an effort to overcome these challenges and improve the effectiveness of in situ remediation using injected amendments, ITRC developed the guidance: Optimizing Injection Strategies and In Situ Remediation Performance (OIS-ISRP-1). The guidance and this associated training course identify challenges that may impede or limit remedy effectiveness and discuss the potential optimization strategies, and specific actions that can be pursued, to improve the performance of in situ remediation by:
    Refining and evaluating remedial design site characterization data;
    Selecting the correct amendment;
    Choosing delivery methods for site-specific conditions;
    Creating design specifications;
    Conducting performance evaluations, and
    Optimizing underperforming in situ remedies.

    The target audience for this guidance and training course is: environmental consultants, responsible parties, federal and state regulators, as well as community and tribal stakeholders. This training will support users in efficiently and confidently applying the guidance at their remediation sites. An optimization case study is shared to illustrate the use of the associated guidance document.

    Prior to attending the training class, participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Optimizing Injection Strategies and In Situ Remediation Performance (OIS-ISRP-1) as well as to be familiar with the characterization process described in Integrated DNAPL Site Strategy (ITRC 2011c). To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/OIS-ISRP_051624/

    Audio for "Federal Facilities Online Academy: Determining Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in RODs," May 14, 2024

    Audio for "Federal Facilities Online Academy: Determining Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in RODs," May 14, 2024

    Determining ARARs at Federal Facility Sites is a two-hour webinar course that will highlight how to determine Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in decision-documents based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance, identify commonly used ARARs, and when to involve partners. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:Understand the general procedures for ARAR identification, analysis, and documentation;Learn about ARARs under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Section 121(d) and associated EPA guidance;Identify the three types of ARARs and how they are determined; and,Explore CERCLA ARAR waiver criteria and the six waivers identified under CERCLA 121(d).The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of ARARs and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total). To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/FFAcademy11_051424/

    Audio for "ITRC PFAS Beyond the Basics: Topics on PFAS Biosolids: Sources, Transport, and Management of PFAS Surface Releases," May 9, 2024

    Audio for "ITRC PFAS Beyond the Basics: Topics on PFAS Biosolids: Sources, Transport, and Management of PFAS Surface Releases," May 9, 2024

    This training class builds on the earlier information for introductory PFAS topics presented in the PFAS 101 CLU-IN training. The ITRC PFAS Beyond the Basics class provides more information related to potential sources of PFAS in biosolids, implications of PFAS associated with land-applied biosolids, vadose zone fate and transport processes that likely govern biosolids releases, treatment/disposal options for PFAS-impacted biosolids, and regulatory considerations.

    Resources and further details for the topics included in this training are in the published PFAS-1 guidance document in Sections 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 12, and 17.3, and the Regulatory Programs Table.
    Learning Objectives:
    Biosolids and PFAS Fate and Transport in the Vadose ZoneSource Zone CharacteristicsVadose Zone Controls on MobilityField Scale Fate, Transport and UptakeCharacterization and TreatmentAdditional Biosolids Considerations and Summary To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/PFAS-BTB-Biosolids_050924/

    Audio for "SRP Progress in Research Webinar Series: Emerging Technologies in Occupational Health and Safety Training and Education - Session II," May 3, 2024

    Audio for "SRP Progress in Research Webinar Series: Emerging Technologies in Occupational Health and Safety Training and Education - Session II," May 3, 2024

    The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is sponsoring a Progress in Research webinar series, hosted by CLU-IN, to showcase federally funded researchers developing curricula and educational programs focused on emergent technologies in the sphere of occupational health and safety.

    The three-part series will highlight researchers' projects, accomplishments, and demonstrate research products — included in this group of researchers are SRP's seven R25 grant recipients as well as participation from the NIEHS Worker Training Program (WTP) and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH).

    To learn about and register for the other sessions in this webinar series, please see the SRP website.

    University of Minnesota | The Interdisciplinary Training, Education and Research Activities for Assessing and Controlling Contaminants from Emerging Technologies (InTERACCT) Program:
    Rachael Jones, Ph.D., will describe the aims and progress made by the Interdisciplinary Training, education and Research Activities for Assessing and Controlling Contaminants from Emerging Technologies (InTERACCT) Program. The InTERACCT program is focused on developing course content for graduate students and continuing education in industrial hygiene through online asynchronous course modules that will be utilized in academic programs and in continuing education. In addition, the project offers several graduate research experiences, including a week-long summer intensive program for undergraduate STEM majors.

    Johns Hopkins University | Program on Occupational Health and Safety Education on Emerging Technologies - Mid Atlantic Partnership (POccET MAP):
    Gurumurthy Ramachandran, Ph.D., will present on the Program on Occupational health and safety education on Emerging Technologies — Mid Atlantic Partnership (POccETMAP) — a collaboration across
    Johns Hopkins University, University of Maryland, George Mason University, and Old Dominion University to develop and widely distribute a web-based curriculum to prepare students in industrial hygiene, STEM disciplines, and occupational health and safety professionals with the skills necessary to address health and safety issues that arise in emerging technology areas. Other aims that Dr. Ramachandran will cover include creating lab and field-based experiences for graduate students, and the development of a Masters in Sustainability and Product Stewardship.

    University of Michigan | Michigan-Ohio Occupational Research Education (MOORE) Program:
    Representing the Michigan-Ohio Occupational Research Education (MOORE) Program are Stuart Batterman, Ph.D., and Kermit Davis, Ph.D., to discuss the overarching goal of leveraging activities at the University of Michigan, University of Cincinnati, and Michigan State University to develop and deliver training and research experiences for graduate students and professionals to advance skills in the field of occupational health and safety. They will expand on their efforts to examine advanced exposure assessment approaches applied to aerosols, indoor air quality and ventilation, and ergonomics, particularly in health care settings, including care in residential settings often performed by low wage and disadvantaged populations. To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/SRPPIR24_050324/

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