9 episodes

Asian Americans Advancing Justice created Count On Your Census to promote a robust response to our nation’s Decennial Census. Each census response is a piece of a puzzle that, when completed, creates a picture of who we are as Americans, and how best the country’s resources can be shared. It determines how the federal government funds and responds to the specific needs of your family and neighbors like schools, hospitals, roads, and community centers. Count On Your Census answers your questions and connects you to a growing moment to count us all in 2020. Please visit CountUsIn2020.org for more information.

Count on Your Census Asian Americans Advancing Justice

    • Non-Profit
    • 5.0, 22 Ratings

Asian Americans Advancing Justice created Count On Your Census to promote a robust response to our nation’s Decennial Census. Each census response is a piece of a puzzle that, when completed, creates a picture of who we are as Americans, and how best the country’s resources can be shared. It determines how the federal government funds and responds to the specific needs of your family and neighbors like schools, hospitals, roads, and community centers. Count On Your Census answers your questions and connects you to a growing moment to count us all in 2020. Please visit CountUsIn2020.org for more information.

    9. From Marginalization to Mobilization

    9. From Marginalization to Mobilization

    The road to Census 2020 is marked by rhetoric and policies from the Trump administration that demonized and marginalized immigrants and people of color well before the President tried to add a citizenship question to the census form. In the final episode of Count of Your Census, John C. Yang and Ana Nduma look back at the implications of this anti-immigrant environment for the 2020 Census and look ahead to the partnership this climate has fostered and to their potential for civil and immigrant rights advocacy. Ana speaks to two noteworthy examples of progress made during these challenging times: new support for Black Diasporic immigrants and a deep commitment by our public library system to making census participation possible for those without digital access. John points to the diverse field of national and local nonprofits and other sectors in supporting a robust census count as another meaningful consequence of a uniquely challenging time.

    • 30 min
    8. Getting the Word Out: Mobilizing Trusted Messengers

    8. Getting the Word Out: Mobilizing Trusted Messengers

    As Vanita Gupta, President and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, explains, the politicization of Census 2020 has made it the most complex enumeration of our American experience. Presidentially imposed barriers to participation in the census by all people in the United States, as constitutionally mandated, has generated high levels of engagement by faith, corporate, public sector, nonprofit and philanthropic leaders in using their clout and resources to ensure a robust count. They are collaborating on organizing and communication strategies, including the development and testing of messages that resonate with the vulnerable communities they represent. These messages are key to overcoming the fear of participation. While message development is vital, it takes, as Vanita observes, trusted messengers to effectively deliver them. At this stage, trusted messengers are rolling out campaigns at the neighborhood level. Whether they are church leaders, librarians, social service providers or community organizers, family members or friends, these are the influencers that we all need to value and support. Vanita hopes that the media will follow these trusted messengers, tell their stories, and deepen our collective understanding of why the census is so important to all of us.  

    • 19 min
    7. Census Communications in a Digital Divide

    7. Census Communications in a Digital Divide

    The decennial Census is a massive and complex operation but Census 2020 poses profound new challenges. From the moment that President Trump tried to impose a citizenship question on the form, the Census became highly weaponized. As a result, targeted communities are afraid to participate in the census, requiring a communications and organizing strategy that is nuanced and sophisticated. To add to this challenge, Census 2020 is our nation’s first primarily digital census, seen as modernization by some and a barrier to participation by others. Over 20 million people lack reliable digital access, making online responses to the census unavailable to many in Indian Country, rural America and underserved urban districts. In this episode, Lizette Escobedo breaks down communications strategies designed to address and overcome these challenges, particularly in immigrant communities. And Francella Ochillo identifies new resources and partnerships, with libraries and local public officials, that are making participation possible in disconnected communities.

    • 33 min
    6. Organizing the Organizers

    6. Organizing the Organizers

    Achieving a complete count in the 2020 Census comes down to rigorous organizing at the ground level. In communities that have been historically undercounted, and fear participation now, the stakes are highest. It takes trusted messengers, primarily community groups with a track record of providing services and building relationships, to mobilize residents to participate in the census process. Across the nation, such organizations are ramping up campaigns designed to overcome fear and apathy. In this episode, we hear from leaders who are committed to a full count, get a glimpse inside those campaigns and hear about their engagement strategies. And we learn about the resources and partnerships that are energizing their efforts.

    • 25 min
    5. Representation Matters

    5. Representation Matters

    Data from the US Census determines how billions of federal dollars are deployed to communities for investment in schools, hospitals, housing assistance, water, transportation and other critical needs. Census data also determines how state legislative district lines are drawn and how political representation is allocated among states. In other words, an accurate count in the Census leads to political power. And an inaccurate count will diminish the voice and political clout of undercounted populations. In this episode, we hear from experts with first-hand redistricting experience and explore the strategies and messaging that are resonating with local organizations to promote full participation in the 2020 Census.

    • 34 min
    4. Tackling the Undercount

    4. Tackling the Undercount

    When the Trump Administration tried to add a citizenship question to the census, the intention was clear. Asking about citizenship status was designed to have a chilling effect on participation, particularly in immigrant communities. But the problem of a census undercount is both historic and well-documented. And the concern about its impacts is shared by the US Census Bureau, academic researchers, and civil rights organizations. In this episode, we talk to leaders in the movement to tackle the undercount head-on and hear their strategies for generating a robust response. From the logistical nightmare of Census enumerators finding households without addresses to the challenge of persuading reluctant undocumented immigrants to be counted, this is the undercount story. 

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

Jule L ,

Simple and helpful

Super helpful and easy to follow along to understand the census!

FreeAppCompany ,

Important cause!

Great content for an important cause!

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