134 episodes

A daily discussion of the COVID-19 pandemic with a diverse collection of disaster experts - hosted by Dr. Scott Gabriel Knowles, a historian of disasters at Drexel University in Philadelphia.

COVIDCalls covidcalls

    • Social Sciences

A daily discussion of the COVID-19 pandemic with a diverse collection of disaster experts - hosted by Dr. Scott Gabriel Knowles, a historian of disasters at Drexel University in Philadelphia.

    EP #135 - 9.25.2020 - Racial Justice, Public Health, and COVID-19 in Philadelphia

    EP #135 - 9.25.2020 - Racial Justice, Public Health, and COVID-19 in Philadelphia

    Today I speak with epidemiologist Sharrelle Barber.Dr. Sharrelle Barber is assistant professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health.  She is a social epidemiologist whose research focuses on the intersection of "place, race, and health." Dr. Barber leverages state-of-the-art epidemiologic cohort studies to examine how neighborhood-level structural determinants of health such as concentrated economic disinvestment and racial residential segregation impact cardiometabolic risk factors and cardiovascular disease onset among Blacks in the Southern United States and Brazil. Dr. Barber’s empirical work and academic commentary has been published in leading academic journals including the Lancet Infectious Disease, the American Journal of Public Health, and Social Science and Medicine. Her work has been externally funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Heart Association, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.Dr. Barber received a Doctor of Science (ScD) degree in Social Epidemiology from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    EP #134 - 9.24.2020 - Marked by COVID and the Cry for COVID-19 Justice

    EP #134 - 9.24.2020 - Marked by COVID and the Cry for COVID-19 Justice

    Today I speak with the founder of Marked by COVID, Kristin Urquiza.Kristin Urquiza, is the Co-founder, Chief Activist of Marked by COVIDKristin is a graduate of Yale University and UC Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy where she has a Master of Public Affairs. She is an environmental advocate at Mighty Earth, where she works to hold corporations like Cargill accountable to their industrial agricultural practices that displace indigenous people from their lands and drive deforestation in places like the Amazon rainforest and beyond. Additionally, Kristin works closely with Liberation in a Generation, a group working to narrow the wealth gap between people of color and white families in the United States within a generation.Her grandparents were migrant farmworkers– from Mexico and Oklahoma — and her father worked in the fields as a child. She grew up in the Maryvale community of Phoenix, and is a proud product of public primary education and the first person in her family to go to college. Maryvale is a community of predominantly people of color and immigrants, and is now seeing the highest rates of COVID-19 in the nation, where people are waiting 13 hours to be tested.

    • 1 hr
    EP #133 - 9.23.2020 - Teaching in COVID-19: Disaster Pedagogy in Real Time

    EP #133 - 9.23.2020 - Teaching in COVID-19: Disaster Pedagogy in Real Time

    Today it is the second of my teaching COVID-19 sessions, today with Sarah Raskin and Nicole Welk-Joerger.Nicole Welk-Joerger is an interdisciplinary historian, trained in the history of science, technology, and medicine as well as anthropology. Her research focuses on human-animal relationships, particularly those that influence health and welfare as they are broadly construed and constantly redefined by agricultural and medical industries. She is currently a Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at North Carolina State University, teaching courses in U.S. history, agricultural history, and the history of science.   Sarah Raskin is a medical anthropologist and Assistant Professor in the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, Virginia Commonwealth University. She draws on her knowledge as a former public health practitioner at local and federal levels to teach urban health, public health emergency preparedness, and health policy across undergraduate and graduate levels. A self described "oral health equity evangelist" and passionate Appalachianist, Sarah collaborates with a multi-disciplinary team that investigates dental disparities and identifies policy and practice-based solutions to drive oral health equity, in close relationship with community partners across the state. She's also a mom and aunt to elementary school-aged kids who are, probably like yours, getting through lessons one Zoom at a time.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    EP #132 - 9.22.2020 -Medical Education in the Pandemic

    EP #132 - 9.22.2020 -Medical Education in the Pandemic

    Today I discuss COVID-19 medical education with Charles Cairnes, dean of the Drexel University School of Medicine.Charles B. Cairns, M.D. is the Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg Dean of the College of Medicine and Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs at Drexel University where he serves as Professor of Medicine and Emergency Medicine.Dr. Cairns has served as Director of the NIH United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group and as Principal Investigator of the National Collaborative for Biopreparedness. He has published over 200 scientific articles and reviews and secured more than $30 million in research funding. Dr. Cairns has received numerous honors and awards, including the ACEP Outstanding Contribution in Research Award, EMF Established Investigator Award, National Foundation of Emergency Medicine Mentor Scholar Award, SCCM Presidential Citation Award and the SAEM John Marx Leadership Award, the highest award in academic emergency medicine.

    • 53 min
    EP #131 - 9.21.2020 - Counting the Dead

    EP #131 - 9.21.2020 - Counting the Dead

    Today I discuss COVID-19 and the difficulties with counting and memorializing the dead in a pandemic with Jacqueline Wernimont. Jacqueline Wernimont is Distinguished Chair of Digital Humanities and Social Engagement & Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Dartmouth CollegeShe is an anti-racist, feminist scholar working toward greater justice in digital cultures and a network weaver across humanities, arts, and sciences.Her efforts to understand computing cultures and advance more just approaches extends beyond the writing of traditional academic books into public, engaged scholarship. This has included writing for popular outlets, multimedia installations, and leading projects on privacy, intersectional approaches to technology and data, and creative communication of computing infrastructures.Her first book, Numbered Lives: Life and Death in Quantum Media came out with MIT Press in 2019—it uses a two-part structure to historicize the counting of life and death in Britain and the United States.  She is also the co-editor of the recent Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and Digital Humanities (with Elizabeth Losh).

    • 1 hr 2 min
    EP #130 - 9.18.2020 - The Pandemic, Public Health, and the Courts

    EP #130 - 9.18.2020 - The Pandemic, Public Health, and the Courts

    Today I discuss recent COVID-19 battles in the courts with Kathy Bergin and Lindsay Wiley.Kathy Bergin is a recognized expert in Disaster Law, she presently teaches at Cornell University Law School—her research extends to humanitarian aid programs and the catastrophic impact of climate change. She has been crucial in promoting Disaster Law as an academic discipline. She is also a successful advocate. Her team in Haiti established binding precedent in a proceeding before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights that reinforced post-disaster human rights obligations. Her work on mass evacuation shelters after Hurricane Katrina is used across the humanitarian sector as a blue-print for protecting displaced survivors. And her knowledge of constitutional standards helped coalition partners in Puerto Rico secure changes in the federal government’s response to Hurricane Maria. She is on the steering committee for Project Blueprint, a policy advocacy organization aimed at promoting a progressive US foreign policy.  Lindsay Wiley is a professor of law and director of the health law and policy program at American University Washington College of Law. She is the author of Public Health Law: Power, Duty, Restraint and Public Health Law and Ethics: A Reader (with Lawrence O. Gostin). Her recent work on the coronavirus pandemic has been published in the Washington Post, Democracy: A Journal, the American Constitution Society’s Expert Forum, and the Harvard Law Review Forum. Professor Wiley is a board member and former president of the American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics and a former member of the National Conference of Lawyers and Scientists. She received her JD from Harvard and her MPH from Johns Hopkins.

    • 1 hr 11 min

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