11 episodes

Crossing The Lane Lines is dedicated to giving voice to the Black Swim community. We connect with coaches, swimmers, authors and activists. Seeking to inform the public about the rich aquatic history of the Black diaspora.

Crossing The Lane Lines Naji Ali

    • Swimming
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Crossing The Lane Lines is dedicated to giving voice to the Black Swim community. We connect with coaches, swimmers, authors and activists. Seeking to inform the public about the rich aquatic history of the Black diaspora.

    Finding Our Own Way Back Home: HBCU’s and the need for more swim programs.

    Finding Our Own Way Back Home: HBCU’s and the need for more swim programs.

    Many Historical Black Colleges and Universities had established swim programs, a place where young Black men and women could attend not only to compete, but feel like they were not aliens in a sport that has been dominated by Whites. But over the last several decades, all but one have dropped their programs. So, what happens to those that wish to continue on in their swimming career, and have an opportunity to not feel out of place? We’ll speak to NCAA Swim Coach Nate Harding, about the need for more HBCU swim programs, and the challenges for elite Black swimmers, and coaches.

    • 30 min
    BLACKS CAN'T SWIM: MY SWIM JOURNEY. A Conversation with filmmaker Ed Accura

    BLACKS CAN'T SWIM: MY SWIM JOURNEY. A Conversation with filmmaker Ed Accura

    Black people have many excuses why we don't swim; hair issues, body type, bone density, parents never learned, chlorine burns the eyes and many more, but who in their right mind walks around in, eats, sleeps, and bathes, with a life vest on? We'll speak to filmmaker, Ed Accura, about his acclaimed film on the subject of Black culture issues with swimming and The black swimming Association.

    • 29 min
    Muhammad Speaks: Making the case for diversity, inclusion and equity in the sport of swimming.

    Muhammad Speaks: Making the case for diversity, inclusion and equity in the sport of swimming.

    USA Swimming recently announced the formation of a Diversity Equity, and Inclusion Council to address and find solutions to the lack of participation of Black, Brown and other marginalized communities within the swimming world, but will this work? Will those at the regional and local levels be willing to adapt to change? Further, would any of this have occurred if we were not in the midst of a once in a life-time global pandemic, and in the middle of the country struggling with its history of systemic racism? We'll speak to former champion and world record holder Sabir Muhammad, about these issues.

    • 27 min
    California Dreaming: Coastal Leisure Spots and the Quest for Human Dignity in the Jim Crow Era.

    California Dreaming: Coastal Leisure Spots and the Quest for Human Dignity in the Jim Crow Era.

    Between 1915 and 1970, nearly six million African Americans fled the Jim Crow South in search of a better life in the North. The vast majority found solace along the East Coast and Mid-West, but some ventured farther to the sands and sun of California. Today we'll speak to historian, Dr. Alison Rose Jefferson, about the great migration westward, and how some Black families, even though racism awaited them, settled along the Californian coastline, and built up beach-side business', leisure spots and cultural spaces. 

    • 29 min
    Making Waves: Black surfers and demand for inclusion and diversity in the water

    Making Waves: Black surfers and demand for inclusion and diversity in the water

    Since May of this year, various sports bodies have spoken out about the need to address  systemic racism. The NFL, NBA, and even USA Swimming have uttered the phrase: “Black Lives Matter.” But while this “so called” solidarity is going on, where is the surf community? Why have they largely remained silent on the issue of racism and privilege? We’ll speak to surfer and coach, Rhonda Harper about the lack of diversity in the line-up,

    • 29 min
    "I'm proud to be the first, but I don't want to be the last.": A Conversation with Maritza McClendon

    "I'm proud to be the first, but I don't want to be the last.": A Conversation with Maritza McClendon

    In 2004, Maritza McClendon became the first African American woman to make an Olympic team, but with this triumph came the burden of representing an entire community. Today, in her own words, she'll talk about her swimming career, the rewards, accolades, and yes the racism that she endured.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

Boomer from CA ,

Timely addition to the BLM conversatoon

An exploration of topics that are new to me. Thank you Naji.

My only wish is for post-editing on sound quality - interviewees are often faint and hard to hear compared to your voice on the pod.

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