100 episodes

Stay current on medical, surgical, and aesthetic dermatology developments with Dermatology Weekly, a podcast featuring news relevant to the practice of dermatology, and peer-to-peer interviews with Doctor Vincent A. DeLeo, who interviews physician authors from Cutis on topics such as psoriasis, skin cancer, atopic dermatitis, hair and nail disorders, cosmetic procedures, environmental dermatology, contact dermatitis, pigmentation disorders, acne, rosacea, alopecia, practice management, and more. Plus, resident discussions geared toward physicians in-training. Subscribe now.

The information in this podcast is provided for informational and educational purposes only.

Dermatology Weekly MDedge

    • Medicine
    • 4.6, 25 Ratings

Stay current on medical, surgical, and aesthetic dermatology developments with Dermatology Weekly, a podcast featuring news relevant to the practice of dermatology, and peer-to-peer interviews with Doctor Vincent A. DeLeo, who interviews physician authors from Cutis on topics such as psoriasis, skin cancer, atopic dermatitis, hair and nail disorders, cosmetic procedures, environmental dermatology, contact dermatitis, pigmentation disorders, acne, rosacea, alopecia, practice management, and more. Plus, resident discussions geared toward physicians in-training. Subscribe now.

The information in this podcast is provided for informational and educational purposes only.

    Immunotherapy for Paget disease: A conversation - Plus, more sunburns for Americans, and a new dermatologic clue for COVID-19

    Immunotherapy for Paget disease: A conversation - Plus, more sunburns for Americans, and a new dermatologic clue for COVID-19

    Unlike most other cutaneous neoplasms, extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) manifests as a chronic erythematous patch. In this resident takeover, Dr. Daniel Mazori talks to Dr. Mohammed Dany about the diagnosis of primary vs secondary EMPD and the importance of screening patients for metastasis or other underlying malignancies. They also discuss the pathogenesis of EMPD and highlight future treatment targets. “The best studies that show potential are the studies focusing on PD-1 [programmed cell death receptor 1] pathway, or the checkpoint pathway. I think there is a lot of potential with immunotherapy for EMPD,” Dr. Dany explains.
    *  *  *
    This week in dermatology news:
    * Americans getting more sunburns (https://bit.ly/33iNOD1)
    * Nine states have no board-certified pediatric dermatologist, analysis reveals (https://bit.ly/3faY5Do) 
    * Is the presence of enanthem a clue for COVID-19? (https://bit.ly/39F2bSV) 
    (JAMA Research Letter: https://bit.ly/3hNZnpK)
    *  *  *
    Things you will learn in this episode:
    * Extramammary Paget disease characteristically presents as an erythematous patch in sites with abundant apocrine glands, such as the vulvar, scrotal, or perianal skin. “Usually the typical story would be, this is a rash that has been treated as eczema for many years but it just doesn’t go away, and it is only until the dermatologist gets a biopsy that the diagnosis of [EMPD] is made,” Dr. Dany explains.
    * Classic biopsy findings include pagetoid spread through the epidermis with larger cells that have blue cytoplasm, dysmorphia, and nuclear atypia. It may appear similar to other pagetoid entities such as melanoma, intraepidermal sebaceous carcinoma, or squamous cell carcinoma in situ.
    * Primary and secondary EMPD present in clinically and prognostically different ways, but it is difficult to discern the 2 entities based on histology.
    * Extramammary Paget disease requires long-term follow-up to monitor for disease recurrence or further development of malignancies. “Every patient newly diagnosed with EMPD deserves a full workup for malignancy screening,” Dr. Dany explains.
    * There currently is no formal staging system or treatment guidelines for EMPD. “Wide local excision has been the default in the past, but recurrence rates were very high,” Dr. Dany notes.
    * More research is needed to understand the pathogenesis of EMPD, but data have shown that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may play an important role in future therapies.
    * Intralesional immunotherapies can be effective in treating EMPD in sensitive areas of the body.
    *  *  *
    Hosts: Nick Andrews; Daniel R. Mazori, MD (Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston)
    Guests: Mohammed Dany, MD, PhD (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia)
    Disclosures: Dr. Mazori reports no conflict of interest. Dr. Dany reports no conflict of interest.
    Show notes: Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears
    *  *  *
    You can find more of our podcasts at http://www.mdedge.com/podcasts     
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgeDerm

    • 28 min
    Dermatology residency during a pandemic, plus the past, future, and current state of ID Dermatology

    Dermatology residency during a pandemic, plus the past, future, and current state of ID Dermatology

    To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Dermatology News, we are looking back at how the field has changed since that first issue in January 1970. The focus in episode 73 is infectious disease. There’s a lot to be grateful for but there are also challenges like antibiotic resistance that weren’t on the radar of dermatologists decades ago.

    In this episode, Nick Andrews welcomes Theodore Rosen, MD, to discuss the past, future, and current state of ID Dermatology.

    You can read more about the past 50 years of ID by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/3hri3v2
    You can learn more about Dr. Rosen by clicking this link: https://bit.ly/2CtdmSU


    *  *  *
    What will your dermatology residency look like in the midst of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)? In this episode, guest host Dr. Candrice Heath talks to Drs. Brittany Oliver (@dr.dermatic), Sophie Greenberg (@sophiegreenbergmd), and Julie Croley (@DrSkinandSmiles) about their experiences navigating through dermatology residency during the COVID-19 pandemic. They share their perspectives from different areas of the country on how the current health crisis has impacted their training and responsibilities. They also provide tips for incoming dermatology residents on how to adapt their expectations to the post-COVID environment.
    “It was so rewarding and I was really anxious to get in and help, hearing about all the stories about exhausted physicians and patients who needed care, so I really felt called to be in the center of it and I’m really happy I could give back in that way,” Dr. Greenberg said of working with COVID-19 patients in New York City.
    Key takeaways from this episode:
    Drs. Oliver, Greenberg, and Croley describe how their roles and duties as dermatology residents have changed as their institutions have prepared for surges of COVID-19 patients. They discuss the impact of the lockdown and shifting priorities within their hospitals on their learning structure and educational opportunities, including lectures and dermatopathology training. “Our didactics were converted to Zoom once the lockdown began. . . . Some attendings volunteered to give us extra lectures because our clinics were not operating in the normal way. It helped compensate to make sure we’re getting enough education and training,” Dr. Greenberg says. Teledermatology services have been crucial to continuing patient care during the pandemic. Drs. Oliver, Greenberg, and Croley talk about the challenges and benefits of using telemedicine both now and in the future. “I am glad to be getting the exposure now so that I can use the experience on a few different platforms, and then wherever I land for my first job, I can hopefully adapt quickly to whatever it is they’re using,” Dr. Oliver says. They offer advice for new dermatology residents who are coming into a residency experience that looks different now than what they expected because of COVID-19. “Everything’s changing on a day-to-day basis: the COVID situation’s changing, the rules and policies are changing in our hospital, what was protocol yesterday might not be protocol today. . . . I think just having patience, being adaptable, and just realizing that hey, everybody is going through the exact same thing . . . is really the best advice I would have for people,” Dr. Croley emphasizes. They reflect on medical knowledge and skills they otherwise would not have learned without their experience as dermatology residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. Residency typically is a time to get to bond with co-residents and lean on family and friends for support through stressful times. Drs. Oliver, Greenberg, and Croley discuss ways they have been staying connected with people during the lockdown and while social distancing. *  *  *
    Hosts: Nick Andrews; Candrice R. Heath, MD (Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Penn.)
    Guests

    • 54 min
    Nemolizumab for atopic dermatitis, 1/3 of older Americans get shingles vaccine, and racial diversity in dermatology training

    Nemolizumab for atopic dermatitis, 1/3 of older Americans get shingles vaccine, and racial diversity in dermatology training

    Dermatology residents must be knowledgeable about dermatologic conditions presenting in patients of various ethnic backgrounds. Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks to Drs. Abigail Cline, Susan Taylor, and Amy McMichael about improving and expanding multiethnic training in dermatology residency. “Now that I’m in residency, it has become very clear how different presentations in skin of color can be, and I can really see the importance of proper training in a racially diverse population,” says Dr. Cline. They discuss ways to ensure that dermatology trainees get adequate exposure to conditions affecting ethnic skin and highlight the role of the Skin of Color Society in reducing racial disparities within the specialty.
    *  *  *
    This week in Dermatology News:
    1. Topical PDE-4 inhibitor for psoriasis effective in phase 2b trial
    Original story: https://bit.ly/38YtdV3 2. Subcutaneous nemolizumab eases itching for atopic dermatitis
    Original story: https://bit.ly/3j3U3jp NEJM article: https://bit.ly/32icCdG 3. About 1/3 of older Americans receive shingles vaccine
    Original story: https://bit.ly/2Cyz9rY CDC report: https://bit.ly/2WmhOJK  *  *  *
    Key takeaways from this episode:
    There is a lack of minority representation in dermatology educational materials such as textbook photographs, which often are heavily skewed toward lighter skin types. Results from a recent survey revealed that dermatology residents in the Midwest and Northwest were not seeing a diverse patient population: “[Residents] in the Northeast, Southeast, and Southwest tended to see more diverse patients, and so they didn’t feel the need for continued lectures or skin of color clinics, but the respondents within the Midwest and the Northwest really wanted to see these patients and really wanted to see what these dermatoses look like in skin of color,” Dr. Cline explains.  To ensure dermatology trainees get adequate exposure to diverse populations, home programs can allow residents to travel and rotate to other programs where they can get firsthand experience diagnosing skin of color patients. The Skin of Color Society aims to reduce racial disparities in dermatology through a variety of programs, including its annual scientific symposium, mentorship program, and research grants. Skin of color centers throughout the United States allow dermatology residents to rotate through and work with large numbers of skin of color patients. “[They also provide] an opportunity for trainees to see patients who are very satisfied with race-concordant visits—that is, the patient and the provider are of the same racial group—so they can observe what goes into making that type of interaction very successful and rewarding for the patient,” says Dr. Taylor. Practicing dermatologists can make a positive impact by mentoring high school, college, or medical students who do not have social capital as well as contributing a gift to societies with mentorship programs that provide opportunities for residents. Dermatologists can create diversity within their own practices to improve patient access to care. “You can be great at what you do, you can be a fantastic dermatologist but still not be culturally competent, so looking at what that really means—how to understand populations that are different from you culturally, how to look at perhaps having individuals in your practice that can make those patients more comfortable . . . whether they may be your nurses or your intake people . . . just sort of looking around and seeing how you can diversify your own space so that when others come they feel like you know what you’re talking about, and I think that’s really the goal overall,” explains Dr. McMichael.    Hosts: Nick Andrews; Vincent A. DeLeo, MD (Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles)
    Guests: Abigail Cline, MD, PhD

    • 26 min
    Nutrient deficiencies & skin disease, plus Republicans and Democrats agree on masks, and adding dermatology to oncology clinics pays off

    Nutrient deficiencies & skin disease, plus Republicans and Democrats agree on masks, and adding dermatology to oncology clinics pays off

    Nutrient deficiencies present clinically in the skin, hair, and nails. Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks to Dr. Bridget Shields about the dermatologist’s role in managing nutritional dermatoses in hospitalized patients. “As dermatologists, we’re trained to recognize subtle detail, and we may be the first or really the only physicians to pick up on the seemingly minor cutaneous manifestations of underlying nutritional disease,” Dr. Shields explains. She highlights key nutrient deficiencies and risk factors that dermatologists may routinely encounter.
    *  *  *
    This week in Dermatology News:
    Lifestyle changes may explain skin lesions in pandemic era patients Study highlights benefits of integrating dermatology into oncology centers Republican or Democrat, Americans vote for face masks *  *  *
    Key takeaways from this episode:
    Undernutrition in hospitalized patients is relatively common but often goes unrecognized because it may develop slowly over months to years. “Early identification and treatment of nutritional deficiencies can drastically improve patient morbidity and mortality and decrease systemwide health care costs,” Dr. Shields explains. It can be easier for dermatologists to diagnose and screen for nutrient deficiencies if they are able to identify at-risk patients. “Some really common medical conditions serve as risk factors that I think we routinely overlook as providers,” Dr. Shields notes. Dietary habits can predispose patients to nutrient deficiencies and therefore should be included as part of the patient’s history. The oral mucosa can provide important insight into a patient’s underlying metabolic and overall systemic health. Hospitalized patients often take in less calorically than they do at baseline. “I think working with a nutritionist can be really important to ensure a patient has appropriate macro- and micronutrient composition of any supplementation provided,” notes Dr. Shields. In most cases, treating the underlying nutrient deficiency will simultaneously treat the associated cutaneous manifestations. Skin-directed topical therapies can be useful in the right context but should not be used alone without the associated nutrient supplementation. More research is needed on how nutritional manipulation may impact the skin and serve as an adjunct to therapy with more traditional medication regimens.  
    Hosts: Nick Andrews; Vincent A. DeLeo, MD (Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles)
    Guest: Bridget E. Shields, MD (University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia)
    Disclosures: Dr. DeLeo is a consultant for Esteé Lauder. Dr. Shields reports no conflict of interest.
    Show notes by: Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears
    *  *  *
    You can find more of our podcasts at http://www.mdedge.com/podcasts     
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgeDerm
     

    • 24 min
    COVID skin patterns vary, classification criteria for discoid lupus, and phase 3 COVID vaccine trials coming, plus top peer-to-peer interviews of 2020

    COVID skin patterns vary, classification criteria for discoid lupus, and phase 3 COVID vaccine trials coming, plus top peer-to-peer interviews of 2020

    This week in Dermatology News: 
    Skin patterns of COVID-19 vary widely

    First validated classification criteria for discord lupus erythematosus unveiled

    Phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trials launching in July Dr. Vincent DeLeo counts down the top downloaded peer-to-peer interviews of Dermatology Weekly in 2020. So far this year, Dr. DeLeo and his colleagues have covered a diverse group of topics impacting the way dermatologists practice medicine, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic—from the continued use of biologics in psoriasis patients to adopting teledermatology to recommending hair products for African American women.
    Teledermatology, Episode 63: Dr. Candrice Heath talked to Dr. George Han about how dermatologists can adapt their clinical practice to conduct quality teledermatology visits with their patients. They discussed potential use cases for teledermatology during the current health crisis and beyond as well as how to address technological barriers to care.
    Hair care products for African American women, Episode 60: Hair salon closures during the coronavirus pandemic have left women of African descent to care for their own hair at home. Dr. Lynn McKinley-Grant and Dr. Susan Taylor talked about hair care products these patients can use so that dermatologists can help African American women take care of their hair and manage dermatologic conditions.
    Biologics during the COVID-19 pandemic, Episode 57: Patients with severe psoriasis may be at higher risk for infection because of increased inflammation in the body. Dr. Lawrence Green discussed how to counsel patients who are taking biologics to control their psoriasis during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    *  *  *
    Hosts: Nick Andrews, Vincent A. DeLeo, MD (Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles)
    Disclosures: Dr. DeLeo is a consultant for Estée Lauder.
    Show notes by: Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears
    *  *  *
    You can find more of our podcasts at http://www.mdedge.com/podcasts     
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgeDerm

    • 32 min
    Urban African Americans have varied dermatologist access, more vulvar melanoma for women, and Derm residents talk compounding medications

    Urban African Americans have varied dermatologist access, more vulvar melanoma for women, and Derm residents talk compounding medications

    Compounding medications allows physicians to customize formulations for individual patients. In this resident takeover, Daniel R. Mazori, MD, talks to Nadine Shabeeb, MD, MPH, about compounding topicals in dermatology. They discuss clinical scenarios in which these treatments may be warranted as well as potential drug combinations. “What’s cool about compounding for [conditions such as acne, rosacea, and hyperpigmentation] is that there are oftentimes multiple etiologies that lead to patients developing those conditions, and with compounding you can mix multiple things together to target some of those different factors,” Dr. Shabeeb says. They also discuss potential disadvantages and regulations for compounded medications.
    *  *  *
    This week in Dermatology News:
    Pilot study shows apremilast effective for severe recurrent canker sores For urban-based African Americans, proximity to a dermatologist varies by ZIP code Vulvar melanoma is increasing in older women *  *  *
    Key takeaways from this episode:
    Compounding is a way of mixing or combining different medications and formulations that are not commonly available at most pharmacies. Advantages of topical compounded medications include simplifying treatment regimens, prescribing treatments for rare conditions that are not commonly available, bypassing potential insurance issues, and creating topical versions of oral medications. Safety and efficacy data for compounded medications are lacking. “This is usually because of the unique nature of what’s being compounded, because multiple different things are oftentimes combined together, so there’s no published data about how safe and also how efficacious these are compared to just one single formulation being used,” Dr. Shabeeb explains. Compounded medications are not covered by insurance, and out-of-pocket cost may be prohibitive for some patients. “That being said, it may be lower than the cost of a branded medication that’s not covered by insurance, but it may be more than a generic medication that is covered by insurance,” Dr. Shabeeb says. Compounding pharmacies follow safety standards set by the U.S. Pharmacopeia, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration prohibits physicians from prescribing compounded medicines that are approved, adulterated, or misbranded drugs. “Compounded medications can’t mimic a branded medication. It has to be either a unique formulation, or combination, or strength,” Dr. Shabeeb explains. Compounding pharmacists can be a great resource for dermatologists in terms of combining appropriate treatments for patients. Hosts: Nick Andrews; Daniel R. Mazori, MD (State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn)
    Guests: Nadine Shabeeb, MD, MPH (University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison)
    Disclosures: Dr. Mazori reports no conflict of interest. Dr. Shabeeb reports no conflict of interest.
    Show notes by: Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears
    *  *  *
    You can find more of our podcasts at http://www.mdedge.com/podcasts     
    Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com
    Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgeDerm

    • 18 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

AshleyTxPA ,

A trusted source

As a Medical professional I love this podcast as a trusted source for info and derm news - great for the ride to/from work.

Darlenica ,

Who is the presenter?

The presenter in the first part of the podcast mispronounces common dermatologic/medical terms so often that it greatly distracts from the content of the podcast. Erythematous, genitourinary, purpuric, acral, and vesicular are just a few examples of mispronounced words and there are too many more. It’s a shame that it makes the podcast too painful for me to listen to. This would be a great volunteer position for medical students or even premed students who would do a better job.

Erez M. ,

Decent basic overview of medical derm lit

Fairly repetitive material being shared, would be great to add some surgical (cutaneous onc) dermatology and even dermatopathology papers clinically relevant to a derm practice. Also, the vocal fry in a guest (telephone?) presenter this past episode made it absolutely impossible to listen to.

Top Podcasts In Medicine

Listeners Also Subscribed To