18 episodes

In this podcast, Jamil Ellis talks with his father, retired Federal Magistrate Judge Ronald Ellis, about the historical role of law in shaping the societal structures which act as barriers to attaining the American dream. They discuss why "legal" is not a synonym for "moral" and why law, a prime actor in creating the problems, can and should be a part of the solution. Join them as they talk about wealth, voting, education, criminal justice and other topics which divide the nation.

https://ellisconversations.tumblr.com/

ellisconversations's podcast Jamil Ellis and Ronald Ellis

    • Government
    • 5.0, 2 Ratings

In this podcast, Jamil Ellis talks with his father, retired Federal Magistrate Judge Ronald Ellis, about the historical role of law in shaping the societal structures which act as barriers to attaining the American dream. They discuss why "legal" is not a synonym for "moral" and why law, a prime actor in creating the problems, can and should be a part of the solution. Join them as they talk about wealth, voting, education, criminal justice and other topics which divide the nation.

https://ellisconversations.tumblr.com/

    Criminal Justice: What you lose

    Criminal Justice: What you lose

    We discuss the efforts in Florida to restore the right to vote for more than one million former felons even after the citizens there voted to amend the state’s constitution to achieve that result. Also discussed are the other collateral effects of having a felony record. These burdens often last a lifetime and disproportionately affect poor and minority individuals caught in the system.

    • 28 min
    Criminal Justice - The Right to Trial

    Criminal Justice - The Right to Trial

    In this episode, the hosts discuss the perils of exercising the right to trial. Public defenders don’t exist everywhere, and where they do, they are overworked and underfunded. Prosecutors fail to disclose evidence helpful to defendants and use peremptory challenges to affect jury composition. Jury verdicts are rarely overturned. Ninety-five percent of the 11-14 million persons arrested each year in the U.S. plead guilty, and this may be the rational choice.

    • 30 min
    Criminal Justice - Legal Lynching

    Criminal Justice - Legal Lynching

    In this episode, the hosts discuss the country’s legacy of racial terror as embodied in lynchings of Blacks by white supremacist groups such as the KKK; how these efforts were designed to maintain racial apartheid by force and intimidation; and how they are related to the use of the criminal justice system and capital punishment statutes in efforts to legally lynch the Scottsboro Boys and the Groveland Boys.

    • 32 min
    Criminal Justice - All about Bail

    Criminal Justice - All about Bail

    In this episode, the hosts discuss the perils of a monetary bail system in a society where as many as three-fourths of families are living paycheck-to-paycheck. The lack of accumulated wealth exacerbates the racial disparities in the criminal legal system and impairs the ability of accused persons to defend themselves when charged with crimes. Recent efforts by New York and other states seek to address these issues.

    • 26 min
    Epidemics, Race, and Healthcare - COVID-19

    Epidemics, Race, and Healthcare - COVID-19

    The hosts discuss why general protocols and algorithms aimed at COVID-19 have the potential to negatively impact healthcare outcomes in uninsured and underinsured communities of color. Myths about Black physical characteristics persist, even among medical students: Black skin is thicker; Blacks are more tolerant of pain; Blacks have stronger immune systems. As medical triage becomes necessary, what false beliefs will misinform those making decisions at the policy level and on the front lines?

    • 22 min
    Criminal Justice - First Encounters

    Criminal Justice - First Encounters

    In this episode, the hosts discuss the critical role which subjective observations play during initial encounters with law enforcement.  Combined with legal rules which allow officers to “tailor” testimony, this subjectivity has had negative impacts on groups perceived as suspects, and caused tensions between police and minority communities.

    • 23 min

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