100 episodes

In this show, William Beutler and Renan Borelli, formerly of KubrickCast, examine one mind-bending film per episode. Directors whose films are likely to come up: David Lynch, Werner Herzog, Christopher Nolan, Terrence Malick, Terry Gilliam, Lars Von Trier, and yes, Stanley Kubrick.

Enter The Void William Beutler + Renan Borelli

    • TV & Film
    • 4.8, 68 Ratings

In this show, William Beutler and Renan Borelli, formerly of KubrickCast, examine one mind-bending film per episode. Directors whose films are likely to come up: David Lynch, Werner Herzog, Christopher Nolan, Terrence Malick, Terry Gilliam, Lars Von Trier, and yes, Stanley Kubrick.

    SXE12: THE FINALE

    SXE12: THE FINALE

    Believe it or not, we have arrived at the 100th and longest and final episode of ENTER THE VOID. On today's episode, your hosts Bill and Renan sit down together in person to reminisce about how they originally came up with the idea for this podcast, how they launched their earlier show KubrickCast, and even how they met in the first place. Next, they revisit their definition of a mindfuck movie for the last time, and then name their mindfuck "Mt. Rushmore" for both the greatest films covered on the series and their favorites... and a few of their least favorites. Plus, what are some films this show would cover if there was a season X+1? Which episodes were the most popular? They also take listener questions, addressing what kind of mindfuck movie they might make, what was the first mindfuck film, and could there still be a book in the future? You'll just have to listen! Finally, a massive thanks to all of Enter the Void's listeners and guest hosts and friends who helped to make this show far more popular than we could have ever imagined.
    Episode links:
    KubrickCast S1E1: Phantom of the Paradise S1E2: Primer S1E6: Lost Highway S1E9: Enter the Void S1E10: Synecdoche, New York S2E1: Eraserhead S2E2: Brazil S2E10: The Tree of Life S3E7: Chungking Express S3E8: World of Tomorrow S4E6: Last Year at Marienbad S5E1: Solaris S5E8: Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me S6E1: Donnie Darko S6E8: Mulholland Drive S7E8: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind S8E1: American Psycho S8E5: The Holy Mountain S9E1: Total Recall S9E2: Raw SXE6: Mindfuck Television SXE11: Blue Velvet Show links:
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    • 2 hr 25 min
    SXE11: BLUE VELVET

    SXE11: BLUE VELVET

    For our final regular episode of the podcast (yep, the whole thing) we finally come to one of the essential films of the mindfuck movie discussion, David Lynch's breakthrough as a popular artist, 1986's BLUE VELVET. Starring Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini, Laura Dern, and of course Dennis Hopper, it was highly controversial upon release, and soon became the favorite film of academics and critical theorists—not to mention the late David Foster Wallace—and today stands as a film classic. But how challenging is it 33 years later? What are we to make of the multi-layered symbolism, the sexual violence, how much was borrowed into Twin Peaks, Lynch's Reaganism, its 50-plus minutes of deleted scenes, and its place in David Lynch's filmography? For the last time, your hosts Bill and Renan take on one film and see where it takes them. Then in two weeks, we'll return for our grand finale, a recap / retrospective of the entire podcast project.
    Episode links:
    Blue Velvet on IMDb Blue Velvet on Wikipedia Roger Ebert initial review Roger Ebert's follow-up column Janet Maslin original NYT review Slate retrospective review in 2011 AV Club retrospective review in 2011 Mental Floss list of Blue Velvet factoids YouTube: Siskel & Ebert on Blue Velvet David Lynch's "eye of the duck" concept Cinephilia & Beyond essay on Blue Velvet Sheila O'Malley on Dean Stockwell as Ben BBC essay on Blue Velvet's cultural context Stephanie Lam on BV's exploration of duality Dennis Lim on Blue Velvet and the Reagan 80s Book: Dennis Lim's The Man from Another Place 1990 NYT article on Twin Peaks, uses "Lynchian" Freudian analysis of the characters' favorite beers 27,000 words on BV symbolism at Idyllopus Press DFW discusses Blue Velvet on Charlie Rose Blue Velvet shooting script as of 8-24-84 YouTube: Blue Velvet deleted scenes Show links:
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    • 2 hr 14 min
    SXE10: GROUNDHOG DAY

    SXE10: GROUNDHOG DAY

    Our pick for this episode is not your usual, bog standard time travel psychological horror... but then again, maybe it is? Today we are doing GROUNDHOG DAY, the 1993 romantic comedy directed by Harold Ramis, starring Bill Murray and Andie MacDowell. A sleeper of a mindfuck, Groundhog Day warmed hearts and tickled funny bones when it debuted early in the Clinton era, but by the 21st century it had come to be recognized for its theological significance—and then YouTube got hold of it, and the rest is history. Today, we discuss: whether it's a proper mindfuck; how long Phil actually spends in the time loop; connections to Buddhism, Catholicism and Judaism; its relationship to Camus, Sisyphus and existentialism; its place in the comedy pantheon; plus: is Ned Ryerson actually the devil?
    Episode links:
    Groundhog Day on IMDb Groundhog Day on Wikipedia Roger Ebert 2005 review NYT on Groundhog Day's religious themes National Review cover story on Groundhog Day Mental Floss roundup of popular interpretations Film School Rejects: DVD commentary highlights IFC: How long does Phil spend in the time loop? ShortList: Is Ned Ryerson the Devil? Original Reddit Ryerson-as-Devil post Den of Geek on the original Danny Rubin script Michael Faust essay for Philosophy Now NPR on the philosophy of Groundhog Day Empire ranks it as top all-time comedy Fan edit: Every Day in One Day Fan edit: How Rita Experienced Groundhog Day TV Tropes discussion about "we'll rent to start" Edge of Tomorrow on Wikipedia Russian Doll on Wikipedia Friday Black on Wikipedia Show links:
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    • 1 hr 29 min
    SXE9: PERFECT BLUE & PAPRIKA

    SXE9: PERFECT BLUE & PAPRIKA

    So this episode was supposed to be just about PERFECT BLUE, Satoshi Kon's 1997 animated psychological thriller. But we couldn't stop at just one! So Renan and Bill went ahead and watched PAPRIKA, his 2006 science-fiction opus too, which also sadly would be his last feature film. Today, your hosts talk about the life and career of Satoshi Kon, his incredible imagination and mastery of technique, and how both films examine themes of dual identities. Also discussed: Perfect Blue on the internet and celebrity culture; Paprika on dreams and filmmaking; how Darren Aronofsky borrowed well and Christopher Nolan borrowed poorly—and borrow they did; plus, are these films definitely anime?
    Episode links:
    Satoshi Kon on Wikipedia Perfect Blue on IMDb Perfect Blue on Wikipedia Paprika on IMDb Paprika on Wikipedia Satoshi Kon interview on PerfectBlue.com Little White Lies on the optimism of Perfect Blue Roisin Kiberd on Perfect Blue and internet celebrity Peach's Almanac tries to explain Perfect Blue SyFyWire tries to explain what happens in Paprika ThatMomentIn also tries to explain Paprika Badass Digest on Black Swan vs. Perfect Blue Film School Rejects on Inception and Paprika "Screaming in a bathtub" side-by-side "Shattered reality" side-by-side Luke Thompson on Kon as anime Satoshi Kon - Editing Space & Time by Tony Zhou Dazed Digital on The Dreaming Machine The Guardian obituary for Satoshi Kon Show links:
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    • 1 hr 23 min
    SXE8: THE FILMS OF LUIS BUÑUEL

    SXE8: THE FILMS OF LUIS BUÑUEL

    How have we got this far without discussing anything by the original film surrealist, Luis Buñuel? Well, today we rectify the situation and discuss not one but four films from the Spanish exile / expatriate moviemaking legend. In this episode, your hosts examine the previously promised UN CHIEN ANDALOU (1929), THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL (1962), and THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE (1972), plus one of his more accessible films, BELLE DE JOUR (1967) with Catherine Deneuve. Among the topics for discussion: Buñuel's peripatetic life and unpopular politics, his roles in both the Surrealist and French New Wave movements, his use of dreams and the subconscious, the targets of his satire, and connections to the works of David Lynch and Last Year at Marienbad.
    Episode links:
    Luis Buñuel on IMDb Luis Buñuel on Wikipedia Surrealism on Wikipedia French New Wave on Wikipedia J. Hoberman on Buñuel's politics in The Nation Un Chien Andalou on IMDb Un Chien Andalou on Wikipedia Un Chien Andalou on YouTube Roger Ebert review of Un Chien Andalou The Exterminating Angel on IMDb The Exterminating Angel on Wikipedia Roger Ebert review of The Exterminating Angel Criterion essay on The Exterminating Angel Senses of Cinema on The Exterminating Angel The Take on The Exterminating Angel The Cinephile Fix on The Exterminating Angel Belle de Jour on IMDb Belle de Jour on Wikipedia Roger Ebert review of Belle de Jour The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie on IMDb The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie on Wikipedia Roger Ebert review of Discreet Charm Pauline Kael review of Discreet Charm Celluloid Wicker Man on walking in Discreet Charm The Outline on DFW and literary journalism S9E5: JOHNNY GOT HIS GUN Show links:
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    • 1 hr 23 min
    SXE7: FIGHT CLUB

    SXE7: FIGHT CLUB

    At long last we get around to a movie that was on our mind when we started this podcast: FIGHT CLUB, the 1999 David Fincher film  starring Edward Norton, Brad Pitt and Helena Bonham Carter, based on the 1996 Chuck Palahniuk novel of the same name. If you don't like politics with your movies, then today's show isn't for you, because Fight Club was born in controversy, released to Boomer acrimony, and then, once it attained cult status, attracted the unwanted—but not altogether surprising—approval of some of the most loathsome ideologues of the 21st century. Today, Bill and Renan take on their most problematic fave, discussing themes of consumerism, capitalism, fascism, toxic masculinity, intergenerational animosity, violence in the media, the culture wars, the WTO, Columbine, Donald Trump, Jeff Bezos' mistress, the death of satire, and much more.
    Episode links: 
    Fight Club on IMDb Fight Club on Wikipedia Fight Club (novel) on Wikipedia Roger Ebert negative review in CST David Denby negative review in NYer Liza Schwarzbaum negative review in EW Janet Maslin positive review in NYT Jim Emerson contemporaneous defense Dennis Lim 2009 positive reappraisal in NYT Garin Pirnia 2016 positive reappraisal in Esquire Best. Movie. Year. Ever. excerpt in The Ringer NYT op-ed: "The End of Satire" Poe's law on Wikipedia Maggie Mae Fish: "Cultural Fascism" video ContraPoints: "What's Wrong With Capitalism" video 2009 NYC attack blamed on Fight Club Broadly on Fight Club's appeal to the alt-right New Statesman on why Fight Club isn't fascist The Guardian on Fight Club, Brexit, and Trump Analysis of Fight Club's Marxist content Junkee on Fight Club's "bad fans" FSR summary of DVD commentary 11 Hidden Secrets in Fight Club Show links:
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    • 1 hr 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
68 Ratings

68 Ratings

eo_captain ,

A podcast necessary for all film buffs

When Renan and William first came into my life was in Kubrick cast. In their initial episode they speak about Fear and Desire. A freshman effort of Kubrick’s that left much to be desired. They’re jocular hope in this first episode was that they too would produce a “2001” worthy effort that would endear them to the public.
“Enter the Void”is that effort. Through this podcast I not only enjoyed the skewed echo chamber I so badly needed to justify my love all things cinema bizarre; but it also opened me to new titles that, perhaps, didn't take themselves so seriously.
This show has been a rare pleasure.
The hosts are thoughtful and the discussion has never bled into pretentiousness.
My only regret is that this show came prepackaged to end...

santiagosantiago ,

Enter The Void? Absolutely!

Great selection of films with insightful discussions. I even discovered a films (The Lyre) that I had never heard of our seen.

brandtucla ,

My 2019 gym listening podcast

I have listened to this podcast almost everyday while working out at the gym this year. It may sound anecdotal or even untrue, but I assure you I am serious. On occasion I swapped it with The Shining 237 podcast of Susan Teklakruglinska (spelling) or listened to Oingo Boingo radio. Obviously, I walked to the beat of my own drum. I rated this 5-stars because it’s very creative and thought provoking.

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