15 episodes

Join us as we interview leading equine researchers from the University of Kentucky in a new podcast series, "Equine Innovators," brought to you by Zoetis. Each day researchers at universities and other institutions around the world are investigating new ways to care for and understand our horses. Whether you realize it or not, the work they do influences your daily interactions with your horses. In this podcast series, we’ll talk to those researchers to learn more about their work.

Equine Innovators TheHorse

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 7 Ratings

Join us as we interview leading equine researchers from the University of Kentucky in a new podcast series, "Equine Innovators," brought to you by Zoetis. Each day researchers at universities and other institutions around the world are investigating new ways to care for and understand our horses. Whether you realize it or not, the work they do influences your daily interactions with your horses. In this podcast series, we’ll talk to those researchers to learn more about their work.

    Does How You Manage Your Horse Farm Make Sense?

    Does How You Manage Your Horse Farm Make Sense?

    As horse owners, we have our rhythms and routines around the barn. But why do we do farm chores the way we do them, and could we—and our horses—benefit from changing our approaches? Steve Higgins, PhD, the director of Animal and Environmental Compliance for the University of Kentucky’s (UK) Agricultural Experiment Station, in Lexington, describes ways horse farm owners and managers can optimize daily horse farm tasks for efficiency, cost-savings, and environmental soundness.

    This podcast series is brought to you by Zoetis. 

    Show notes:
    Using Drylots to Conserve Pastures and Reduce Pollution PotentialUsing Soil-Cement on Horse and Livestock FarmsEconomics of Round Bale Feeders ExaminedHay Feeder Height Affects Neck, Back, and Jaw PosturesGroup or Individual Horse Housing: Which is Less Stressful?Does Your Horse Need Rest? Give Him More Bedded Space.Winter Can Mean Poor Footing for HorsesAbout the Expert: Steve Higgins, PhD, is the director of Animal and Environmental Compliance for the University of Kentucky’s (UK) Agricultural Experiment Station, in Lexington. During his time at UK, Higgins has helped establish the university’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environment as a leader in animal welfare and environmental stewardship and has cultivated a new way of thinking for managing UK’s Experiment Station farms. Through his extension publications, presentations, and demonstrations throughout the state, Higgins shares his unique perspective and working knowledge of water quality, farm efficiency, and resource management issues with Kentucky landowners and farm managers.

    • 46 min
    Horse Transport and Stress

    Horse Transport and Stress

    In this episode Dr. Amanda Adams and PhD student Erica Jacquay of the University of Kentucky’s Gluck Equine Research Center describe new research on how horses of all ages respond to transport—even just 1.5-hour trips across town. They also preview the results of a survey of U.S. horse owners and their trailering practices.

    This podcast series is brought to you by Zoetis. 

    Show notes:
    Article: Immunosenescence: What Owners of Old Horses Need to KnowArticle: How Does Transport Impact Senior Horse Immune Function?Article: Equine Immunity: From Birth to Old AgeArticle: It’s All Connected: Bodywide Inflammation in HorsesPodcast: Equine Innovators: Dr. Amanda Adams Talks about Older HorsesAbout the Researchers: 
    Amanda A. Adams, PhD, is an associate professor and a Mars Equestrian Fellow at the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Center. She’s authored 40+ peer-reviewed scientific publications and presented her research at more than 40 national and international scientific meetings. Her research interests include the geriatric horse’s immune system; adiposity’s effects on horses’ inflammatory responses, particularly in EMS horses; and the mechanisms responsible for and pathways involved in EMS to identify potential treatments that target both the inflammatory and metabolic component of the disease.

    Erica Jacquay, MSc, is a PhD student and the first Mars Equestrian Scholar in the Department of Veterinary Science at the University of Kentucky working under Amanda Adams, PhD. Erica earned her BS in animal science from Virginia Tech and graduated from Kansas State with a MS with an emphasis on equine reproductive physiology. She’s worked in various facets of the equine industry, including training dressage horses, working on a large sport horse breeding farm, and working in a veterinary diagnostic laboratory. Her research program focuses on equine transportation, with specific aims to evaluate the impact of short-term transportation on stress and immune function in horses.

    • 32 min
    Equine Reproductive Health

    Equine Reproductive Health

    In this episode Dr. Barry Ball of the University of Kentucky’s Gluck Equine Research Center describes what he and his colleagues have learned about reproductive endocrinology, placental function, feeding broodmares, and equine contraception during his time as the Clay Endowed Chair in Equine Reproduction. Ball, who retires this month, also reflects on 35 years of equine reproduction research. 

    This podcast series is brought to you by Zoetis. 

    Show notes: 
    Nocardioform Placentitis September 2020 Workshop (Lectures curated by Dr. Barry Ball) Identifying High-Risk Pregnancies Seminar Anti-Mullerian Hormone Helps Assess Aging Mares’ Fertility New IUD for Suppressing Estrus in Mares (June 2019) About the Researcher: Dr. Ball received his DVM degree from the University of Georgia in 1981. He completed a theriogenology residency at the University of Florida and his graduate training at Cornell University. He was a member of the faculty at Cornell University from 1987 to 1996. In 1996 he was appointed as the first Hughes Endowed Chair in Equine Reproduction at the University of California, Davis. In 2010 he was appointed as the first Clay Endowed Chair in Equine Reproduction at the University of Kentucky. Dr. Ball’s research has been directed toward reproductive endocrinology and pregnancy loss in mares.  
    His research is documented in more than 200 refereed research publications. He has served as primary mentor for ten PhD students, six MS candidates, and 17 postdoctoral or visiting scholars. He also mentored 16 clinical residents who are board-certified by the American College of Theriogenologists. Of his trainees, ten serve as current or past faculty members in veterinary medicine in the U.S., Canada, Europe, and South America. 
     Dr. Ball is a diplomate of the American College of Theriogenologists (ACT). He has received numerous awards, including the SmithKlineBeecham Award for Research Excellence, the Excellence in Equine Research Award from the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Schering-Plough Award for Outstanding Research from the World Equine Veterinary Association, the Norden–Pfizer Distinguished Teacher award from UC Davis, and the Theriogenologist of the Year award. Ball was a Fulbright Distinguished Scholar at the University of Cambridge 2004-2005. He is a past chair of the International Equine Reproduction Symposium Committee, and he is a past president of the ACT. 

    • 36 min
    Rotavirus on the Move in Foals

    Rotavirus on the Move in Foals

    In this episode Dr. Emma Adam of the University of Kentucky describes the research that identified a novel strain of rotavirus in foal diarrhea cases this year.
    This podcast is the twelfth episode in our “Equine Innovators” podcast series, brought to you by Zoetis.

    Show notes:
    An Update on Rotavirus in FoalsSessions from the 2021 Rotavirus Workshop, funded by the University of Kentucky’s CAFE Gluck Equine Research Center Koller Emergency Response Funds and gifts from the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association/Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders, Coolmore America, and Grayson Jockey Club.The Gluck Equine Research CenterThe Gluck Center’s newsletters, Equine Science Review and Equine Disease QuarterlyPractical Biosecurity Tips to Protect Your HorseInfographic: Protecting Your Horse From DiseaseAbout the Researcher:
    Emma Adam, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, ACVS, is an assistant professor at the University of Kentucky’s (UK) Gluck Equine Research Center and the equine outreach veterinarian for UK’s Department of Veterinary Science. Her career focuses on the health and wellbeing of the equine athlete and she has worked in four countries on three continents. Adam received her veterinary degree from the Royal Veterinary College, in the U.K., after which she gained equine internal medicine specialty training at Texas A&M University and equine surgery specialty training at the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center. She completed her PhD research in regenerative medicine as it relates to articular cartilage using RNA sequencing at the Gluck Center. Her primary role now is to connect the university with equine industry stakeholders through outreach and the dissemination of information.

    • 33 min
    Exploring Demand for Wild Horses

    Exploring Demand for Wild Horses

    How many American horse owners are willing to adopt wild horses and what type would they select? Jill Stowe, PhD, of the University of Kentucky, recently found out.

    Show notes:
    Can Horse Owners Absorb the Surplus of Wild Horses?Contact Dr. Stowe if you’re interested in studies on incentive programs and wild horse training competitions.This podcast is the eleventh episode in our “Equine Innovators” podcast series, brought to you by Zoetis.

    About the Researcher: Jill Stowe, PhD, is a full professor in the University of Kentucky’s Department of Agricultural Economics (UK Ag). She previously served as director of the UK Ag Equine Programs. Her areas of specialization include economics of the equine industry, decision-making under risk and uncertainty, and neuroeconomics. 

    • 29 min
    The Horse Pathologist’s Perspective

    The Horse Pathologist’s Perspective

    Pathology has been defined as the science of the causes and effects of diseases. In this month's episode Dr. Jennifer Janes of the University of Kentucky describes her work as an equine pathologist—essentially a CSI for horse diseases, conditions, and poisonings.
    This podcast is the ninth episode in our “Equine Innovators” podcast series, brought to you by Zoetis.

    Additional Resources: 
    Wobbler Syndrome: What’s Going on With the the Neck Vertebrae?Wobbler Syndrome: What We Know and Where We’re HeadedWhere are we Headed With Wobbler Syndrome?About the Researcher: Jennifer Janes, DVM, PhD, graduated from Vanderbilt University in 2002 with a Bachelor of Music degree focused on piano before heading to the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. After graduation, she completed a one-year rotating internship at Wisconsin Equine Clinic and Hospital. Developing interests in equine musculoskeletal disease lead her to the University of Kentucky, where she completed a dual anatomic pathology residency and PhD program in the Department of Veterinary Science, finishing in 2014. Since 2015 Jennifer has been on faculty there at the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (UKVDL) and is currently associate professor of veterinary anatomic pathology in the Department of Veterinary Science.

    • 37 min

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