16 episodes

Eusebius McKaiser, well-known broadcaster, author, and now also contributor and political analyst for TimesLIVE, hosts a weekly podcast that journeys to the heart of major news items, dissecting politics, law, and ethics.

Eusebius is known for sharp debate, and this podcast is no different. It will inform, entertain, explain and frame evidence-informed debates about the major stories of the week.

Eusebius on TimesLIVE TimesLIVE Podcasts

    • News

Eusebius McKaiser, well-known broadcaster, author, and now also contributor and political analyst for TimesLIVE, hosts a weekly podcast that journeys to the heart of major news items, dissecting politics, law, and ethics.

Eusebius is known for sharp debate, and this podcast is no different. It will inform, entertain, explain and frame evidence-informed debates about the major stories of the week.

    Black consciousness, white tears: ubuntu's challenge to liberalism

    Black consciousness, white tears: ubuntu's challenge to liberalism

    Eusebius discussed Black Consciousness, liberation theology and white liberals with Harvard University doctoral candidate and author Panashe Chigumadzi. In this latest episode of Eusebius on TimesLIVE, Chigumadzi starts off by explaining why it is important for black people to not be distracted by anti-black racism, puzzling through the conundrum that racism cannot be avoided in analysis and activism but that, nevertheless, aspects of the justice project requires white people to do work on and amongst themselves without the presence of black people.

    • 40 min
    What does it all mean? Three crucial insights from part one of the state capture report 

    What does it all mean? Three crucial insights from part one of the state capture report 

    In this week's edition of Eusebius on TimesLIVE, Eusebius offers some initial insights, as TimesLIVE contributor and analyst, into part one of the state capture report.

    He explains the difference between ordinary corruption and state capture, and why it is crucial to understand the true nature of state capture which is worse than mere corruption.

    He also argues that we should reckon, as a country, with the true total cost of state capture which includes the damaging of our constitutional architecture.

    McKaiser ends his analysis by challenging civil society to reframe the question of whether or not there will be accountability as a first person question, "What will I do to hold the state and business accountable?" He agitates for civil society to leverage its collective agency to ensure that it is not business as usual now that we are empowered with the facts about what has been and is happening within the country.

    • 17 min
    Was the state capture inquiry worth all the time, money and effort?

    Was the state capture inquiry worth all the time, money and effort?

    In this riveting live discussion, contributor and analyst for TimesLIVE, Eusebius McKaiser, is joined by senior investigative journalist at the Sunday Times, Sabelo Skiti, and advocate Nicole Fritz, director of the Helen Suzman Foundation, to unpack the findings contained in the first report from the state capture inquiry.
    The first part of the report was released on Tuesday afternoon. Was the state capture inquiry worth the time, effort and money poured into it, or was the inquiry chaired by acting chief justice Raymond Zondo yet another waste of state resources? 

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Political parties should 'introspect or close shop'

    Political parties should 'introspect or close shop'

    Sunday Times columnist Prof William Gumede argues that political parties should either be willing to introspect after the recent local government elections or “close shop”.
    He appeared on Eusebius on TimesLIVE, responding to a sustained critique of his recent work by veteran ANC leader and activist Mavuso Msimang.

    Msimang had accused Gumede of “intellectual paucity” for speculating about the reasons why many voters had this time not chosen to vote ANC.

    Gumede inferred from the recent electoral outcome that voters intentionally sought to bring about coalitions, which Msimang thinks is an unsubstantiated claim too many pundits are making.

    This dialectic between these well-known thinkers is, at its core, about whether the ANC may be able to reverse its electoral fortunes, or whether a new era of coalitions will take root at provincial and national levels.

    • 30 min
    ‘Ramaphosa made fundamental mistakes after ascending to power’

    ‘Ramaphosa made fundamental mistakes after ascending to power’

    Veteran ANC leader and activist Mavuso Msimang has critiqued the leadership of President Cyril Ramaphosa in a frank discussion with TimesLIVE contributor and analyst Eusebius McKaiser.
    Msimang argues that Ramaphosa’ fundamental mistake is being “too cautious” and playing a “long game” instead of moving quickly against those who are self-interested and not aligned with the values of the organisation. He says the president should leverage his popularity — knowing that personally it is even bigger than that of the ANC — to chart a new way forward. Instead, argues Msimang, Ramaphosa’s cautious approach allows those interested in corruption to regroup.In a wide-ranging conversation in this episode of Eusebius on TimesLIVE, Msimang also offers a sustained critique of Sunday Times Daily columnist William Gumede’s post-election analysis. He accuses Gumede of displaying “intellectual paucity” for lacking the necessary empirical data to support an argument that voters voted for coalition governance. Msimang cautions analysts to not use “emotion” when analysing electoral patterns and argues that there is no proof voters had “a priori” intention to usher in coalition governments. While scathing of corruption within the ANC-led state, Msimang thinks the ruling party, DA and EFF may do better, but that each has major internal weaknesses that will need to be eliminated to improve their future electoral prospects.

    • 36 min
    Covid-19 pandemic shows Ramaphosa is no crisis president

    Covid-19 pandemic shows Ramaphosa is no crisis president

    Eusebius McKaiser is joined by University of Cape Town (UCT) law professor, author and political analyst Richard Calland in his latest episode of Eusebius on TimesLIVE. They discuss whether a mandatory state vaccination policy will pass the rights limitations test of the constitution.
    Calland explains why the core requirements of rationality and favourable analysis of competing rights that are at stake will ultimately fall on the side of mandatory vaccinations. The efficacy of vaccines and absence of less restrictive means of dealing effectively with Covid-19 are legal premises, based on scientific evidence, that could persuade the bench.
    The discussion then segues into political analysis, with a focus on President Cyril Ramaphosa’s leadership. McKaiser and Calland are of the view, and offer arguments in support thereof, that Ramaphosa is no crisis president. His style and approach to problem-solving is admirably collaborative, but this is not appropriate within the context of a deep crisis that requires decisive thought leadership and action rather than agnosticism.
    Calland urges the president to ignore the noise of anti-vaccine campaigners and focus on sound science as the basis of rational policy formation.

    • 29 min

Top Podcasts In News

Tortoise Media
The New York Times
The Daily Wire
NPR
Deuxmoi & Cadence13
The Daily Wire

You Might Also Like

Eusebius
Primedia Broadcasting
CliffCentral.com
CliffCentral.com
BBC World Service
BBC World Service