30 episodes

Failed Architecture is a podcast on architecture and the real world. By opening up new perspectives on the built environment, we seek to explore the meaning of architecture in contemporary society. FA challenges dominant spatial fashions and explores alternative realities, reaching far beyond the architectural community. We combine personal stories with research and reflection, always remaining committed to the idea that architecture is about social justice and climate justice, pop culture and subculture, representation and imagination, and everything that happens after the building’s been built.

Failed Architecture Failed Architecture

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 16 Ratings

Failed Architecture is a podcast on architecture and the real world. By opening up new perspectives on the built environment, we seek to explore the meaning of architecture in contemporary society. FA challenges dominant spatial fashions and explores alternative realities, reaching far beyond the architectural community. We combine personal stories with research and reflection, always remaining committed to the idea that architecture is about social justice and climate justice, pop culture and subculture, representation and imagination, and everything that happens after the building’s been built.

    On Discomfort: Episode 3 w/ Sasha Plotnikova, Juana, María Victoria and María

    On Discomfort: Episode 3 w/ Sasha Plotnikova, Juana, María Victoria and María

    Listen to this episode and subscribe to the FA podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Overcast.



    For Breezeblock #34, editors María Victoria Londoño-Becerra, Juana Salcedo, and María Mazzanti discuss with Sasha Plotnikova her most recent article: A Cage by Another Name, where the author delves into the carceral logics behind the LA’s tiny home villages.

     

     

    • 30 min
    Architectural Workers Organising in Europe w/Marisa Cortright, Part 2

    Architectural Workers Organising in Europe w/Marisa Cortright, Part 2

    This episode is the second of a two-part interview with Marisa Cortright (the first episode is available here). Marisa is the author of the Failed Architecture article “Death to the Calling: A Job in Architecture is Still Just a Job” and, more recently, Can This Be? Surely This Cannot Be?, a book composed of three essays on the subject of architectural workers organising in Europe.

    In this second part, Marisa and host Charlie Clemoes start by speaking about the Pritzker Prize and the problem of design solutions. They then go on to explore why it’s taken architects so long to organise and, the real burning question, are architects oppressed? The episode ends with a discussion of various organising efforts occurring across Europe and an assessment of the consciousness-raising function of the meme account Dank Lloyd Wright.

    You can access a transcript of the conversation in the article version posted on our website.

    If you want to continue the conversation, chat about FA matters or talk to one of our editors, head to our Discord server.

    • 25 min
    Architectural Workers Organising in Europe w/Marisa Cortright, Part 1

    Architectural Workers Organising in Europe w/Marisa Cortright, Part 1

    This episode is the first of a two part interview with Marisa Cortright, author of the Failed Architecture article “Death to the Calling: A Job in Architecture is Still Just a Job” and, more recently, Can This Be? Surely This Cannot Be?, a book composed of three essays on the subject of architectural workers organising in Europe.

    In this first part, Marisa and host Charlie Clemoes speak about their shared position as non-architects working in architecture, then they go on to speak about the function of certain keywords in entrenching existing power dynamics in the architectural practice. But first, they start by talking about the book’s structure and the content of the book’s three essays and particularly its second essay, which explores the boundaries of Europe and its historic role in facilitating iniquities, both in the sector and the world at large.

    You can find a transcript of this conversation in the article version posted on our website.

    If you want to continue the conversation, chat about FA matters or talk to one of our editors, head to our Discord server.

    • 25 min
    FURIA/ w Felipe Arturo

    FURIA/ w Felipe Arturo

    Listen to this episode and subscribe to the FA podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Overcast.



    Continuando con la serie de conversaciones, podcasts y artículos sobre protesta y espacio público en Bogotá, la editora María Mazzanti habló con el artista colombiano Felipe Arturo sobre la exposición FURIA, Efectos palpables de los afectos (políticos) en los cuerpos (colectivos). La muestra busca documentar hechos históricos en Colombia, relacionándolos con el Paro Nacional a través de obras que resaltan la presencia del cuerpo, la memoria y la materia.

    FURIA  Efectos palpables de los afectos (políticos) en los cuerpos (colectivos).



    Exposición colectiva y archivo documental, parte del ciclo:  FIESTA, FURIA y FRACASO. Estados emocionales en épocas electorales

    Curaduría artística: Felipe Arturo

    Asistencia de curaduría: Andrés Suárez

    Diseño museográfico: Andrés Suarez y Felipe Arturo

    Curadores del ciclo: Ana María Montenegro, Felipe Arturo e Iñaki Chávarri

    Artistas comisionados: Estefanía García Pineda, Eblin Grueso, Carolina Fandiño Salcedo, Valeria Montoya Giraldo, Eider Yangana.

    Artistas invitados: Paola Pabón Bermúdez, Milena Bonilla, Gabriel Zea, Francisco Toquica, Katy Jiménez Calderón y +Voces

    Medios Invitados: Mosaico Documental con información de Cuestión Pública, Cerosetenta, Newsy, Vice, The Guardian, France 24, S.O.S. Colombia Cultural, Mujeres en ReExistencia, Deutsche Welle, Vice News, Canal 2 Cali, Temblores, El Espectador

    REFERENCIAS

    1:59 Podcast: La Ciudad es Nuestra, La noche es Nuestra. Conversación con Temblores ONG

    1.59 BB#22: Protestas en Colombia y Legitimidad Narrativa w/ Juan Corcione

    1.59 Artículo: El Vacío de los Héroes por Juana Salcedo y María Mazzanti

    1.59 BB#27: Huellas de Desaparición con Manuel Correa

    1.59 Situation #9 Héroes en Disputa

    25.32 Libro “Rabia: afectos, violencia, inmunidad” de Laura Quintana.

    • 31 min
    Stop Building Prisons w/ Sashi James, Maggie Luna, Avalon Betts-Gaston

    Stop Building Prisons w/ Sashi James, Maggie Luna, Avalon Betts-Gaston

    Listen to this episode and subscribe to the FA podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Overcast.



    For Breezeblock #30, editor christin hu chats with community organizers Maggie Luna, Avalon Betts-Gaston, and Sashi James about their recent action at HDR (Henningson, Durham, Richardson), one of the largest architecture firms in the world, who are responsible for designing hundreds of prisons. Together, they discuss the reasons why architects should refuse to take part in the building of prisons and what they can do instead.

    On June 24, The National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls, Families for Justice as Healing, Lioness: Justice Impacted Women’s Alliance, Design as Protest, Texas Statewide Leadership Council, and Illinois Alliance for Reentry & Justice organized an action outside of HDR’s office in Chicago (same day as the AIA conference) demanding that this international Architecture, Engineering, and Planning firm stop designing prisons (they have designed over 275). This marks just one of many actions inviting HDR to work with (rather than against) communities over the past years.

    Read the full statement of demands here and original letter to HDR here. Below is an edited transcription of the conversation. Some links and resources are provided at the end of the article.

    TRANSCRIPTION

    christin (CH): Hello and welcome to Failed Architecture Breezeblocks, where our editors share their thoughts on works in progress, urgent matters and current happenings in architecture and spatial politics. My name is christin hu and I’m an editor on Failed Architecture’s New York City team, and I’m here with Maggie Luna, Avalon Betts-Gaston and Sashi James, who have been organizing against the building of prisons.

    Maggie (ML): Hi, I’m Maggie Luna. I am in Texas. I work with the Statewide Leadership Council. I am a community outreach coordinator and lead organizer for formerly incarcerated people and advocates in Texas.

    Avalon (AB): Hi, thanks for having me. My name is Avalon Betts-Gaston. I am the project manager for the Illinois Alliance for Reentry and Justice. Obviously, we’re out of Illinois. We’re a coalition of directly impacted people, service providers, stakeholders and allies all united to remaking the criminal legal system. Thanks for having me.

    Sashi (SJ): Hi, I’m Sashi James, and I’m in Families for Justice as Healing, and the National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated

    • 26 min
    On Discomfort: Episode 2 w/ René, Juana, María Victoria and María

    On Discomfort: Episode 2 w/ René, Juana, María Victoria and María

    Listen to this episode and subscribe to the FA podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Overcast.



    For Breezeblock #29, editors María Victoria Londoño-Becerra, Juana Salcedo, and María Mazzanti discuss with FA editor René Boer his upcoming book: The Smooth City*.Framed in the conversations around discomfort and space*, the editors talk about how the homogenization of urban environments and the mechanisms that maintain the smoothness of the contemporary city remove the possibility for non-normative subjects to inhabit it.   The conversation unfolds around topics of whiteness, public space, queerness and how to live together.

    REFERENCES

    Smooth City is the New Urban

    On Discomfort: Episode 1 w/ Juana, Maria Victoria and María

     

     

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

Xeronimo ,

Excellent Colombian Perspectives

It is really hard to get perspectives from real voices from the protests in Colombia on international mediums. This is focused on student/academic voices, but they are from people who have real concern over public space and social communication.

namrogetak ,

Excellent podcast

Fascinating conversations with people thinking deeply about the built environment. Highly recommended.

Top Podcasts In Arts

Blind Nil Audio and Pod People
Avery Trufelman
NPR
The Moth
Roman Mars
Rusty Quill

You Might Also Like

Roman Mars
Dallas Taylor
NPR
Plosive
Goalhanger Podcasts
Aaron Prinz