20 episodes

Chad Cargill took the ACT test 18 times in high school raising his score 13 points and scoring in the 99.5 percentile. He is the nation's leading ACT test prep workshop presenter having taught over 200,000 students over the last 28 years. He travels the midwest each school day teaching students, faculty, and parents how to beat the ACT. His full workshop schedule can be found at calendar.chadcargill.com. His website is chadcargill.com.

Chad Cargill's ACT Test Prep Chad Cargill

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    • 5.0, 16 Ratings

Chad Cargill took the ACT test 18 times in high school raising his score 13 points and scoring in the 99.5 percentile. He is the nation's leading ACT test prep workshop presenter having taught over 200,000 students over the last 28 years. He travels the midwest each school day teaching students, faculty, and parents how to beat the ACT. His full workshop schedule can be found at calendar.chadcargill.com. His website is chadcargill.com.

    Episode 20: High School Athletes: NCAA Eligibility, Recruiting & Your ACT

    Episode 20: High School Athletes: NCAA Eligibility, Recruiting & Your ACT

    Some athletes believe their ACT scores, high school classes, and grades won't matter. The NCAA says differently.


    Athletes must be an NCAA qualifyer to compete. Part of the requirements is a combination of ACT and core GPA. You must meet the minimum core requirements to qualify. This varies by division.


    NCAA's Use of ACT Scores:



    Use a sliding scale of ACT and GPA.
    Do not use ACT writing.
    Use superscores.


    Some colleges have their own requirements higher than the NCAA.


    Some schools internally use a tier system for recruited athletes.


    If you think you may want to be a college athlete:
    -Verify you are on track to have all required core courses.
    -Calculate your core GPA
    -Calculate your superscore
    -Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center


    http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/future/educational-resources


    Division 1 Fact Sheet
    http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/eligibility_center/Student_Resources/DI_ReqsFactSheet.pdf


    FULL QUALIFIER
    • Complete 16 core courses.
    • Ten of the 16 core courses must be completed before the seventh semester (senior year) of high school.
    • Seven of the 10 core courses must be in English, math or natural/physical science.
    • Earn a core-course GPA of at least 2.300.
    • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching the core-course. GPA on the Division I sliding scale (Click on fact sheet link above)
    • Graduate high school.


    Division 2 Fact Sheet
    http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/eligibility_center/Student_Resources/DII_ReqsFactSheet.pdf


    FULL QUALIFIER
    • Complete 16 core courses.
    • Earn a core-course GPA of at least 2.200.
    • Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching the core-course. GPA on the Division II full qualifier sliding scale (see back page).
    • Graduate high school.


    Many sports teams offer partial athletic scholarships. Often, these partials can be supplemented with academic scholarships.


    Objective scholarships are defined as money given to every student who meets defined objectives which are typically ACT and GPA related.




    I’d love to connect with you and keep you posted on upcoming episodes and resources. For a free downloadable pdf What Scholarship Committees Look for and How to Win Them, go to scholarships.chadcargill.com, and get your guide now.


    For a free downloadable pdf of Key Things You Must Know on Test Day, go to [testday.chadcargill.com](testday.chadcargill.com), and get your guide now.


    If you enjoyed the podcast, please leave a review on your podcast app. Leave a shout out for your high school, and I may read it on a future podcast.


    If you have questions, leave a comment here or on the Chad Cargill Workshops Facebook page.


    To view the workshop calendar, go to calendar.chadcargill.com. You can also order the prep book Chad Cargill's ACT and sign up for speed reading at chadcargill.com. If you are interested in hosting a workshop at your high school, call our office at (405) 454-3233 or email penny@chadcargill.com.


    chadcargill.com
    Twitter: @ChadCargill


    Thanks for listening to the podcast!

    • 15 min
    Episode 19: Master These 5 Comma Rules and Raise Your ACT Score

    Episode 19: Master These 5 Comma Rules and Raise Your ACT Score

    There are five key comma rules you must know to score well in ACT English.


    1. Use a comma to separate main clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction. The common coordinating conjunctions are and, but, or, nor, for, so, and yet. A main clause is one that has both a subject (s) and a verb (v).


    EX: We went to the store, and we spent our money.
    S/V, and S/V.


    -Some memorize the conjunctions with the word FAN BOYS


    2. Set off words, phrases, and clauses that are not needed (nonessential). Use commas around nonessential, transitional, or contrasting information. Non-restrictive elements function much like appositives.


    3 Examples Below:



    Intense preparation, then, is known to produce higher
    test scores. (transitional)
    Robert Frost, a Pulitzer Prize winner, is known for his
    poem “Birches.” (nonessential)
    Robert Kurson, not Stephen King, is my favorite
    author. (contrasting)


    3. Use a comma after an introductory phrase, clause, and adverb. Short introductory prepositional phrases do not require commas unless needed for clarity.
    3 Examples Below:



    To be able to compete on the collegiate level, many
    high school athletes practice their sport all year.
    If you are counting on a college scholarship, pay
    attention to your grades, class rank, community
    service, and standardized test scores.
    Occasionally, the person actually responsible for the
    vandalism will be caught and pay the damage.


    4. A series can be defined as three or more words, phrases, or clauses in a sentence that have the same grammatical rank.
    EX: I am taking biology, calculus and history.


    -The comma before the word _and _is optional.


    5. Use commas to separate adjectives in a series that describe the same word.
    EX: The old, blue shirt was worn today.
    EX: The dark blue shirt was worn today. The second sentence does not have a comma between dark and blue because dark describes blue; whereas, in the first sentence old does not describe blue.


    -Can you replace the comma with the word and?
    -Can you reverse the words?


    Pages 41-49 of Chad Cargill's ACT prep book provides these rules, examples, exercises, and model ACT questions.




    I’d love to connect with you and keep you posted on upcoming episodes and resources. For a free downloadable pdf What Scholarship Committees Look for and How to Win Them, go to scholarships.chadcargill.com, and get your guide now.


    For a free downloadable pdf of Key Things You Must Know on Test Day, go to [testday.chadcargill.com](testday.chadcargill.com), and get your guide now.


    If you enjoyed the podcast, please leave a review on your podcast app. Leave a shout out for your high school, and I may read it on a future podcast.


    If you have questions, leave a comment here or on the Chad Cargill Workshops Facebook page.


    To view the workshop calendar, go to calendar.chadcargill.com. You can also order the prep book Chad Cargill's ACT and sign up for speed reading at chadcargill.com. If you are interested in hosting a workshop at your high school, call our office at (405) 454-3233 or email penny@chadcargill.com.


    chadcargill.com
    Twitter: @ChadCargill


    Thanks for listening to the podcast!

    • 18 min
    Episode 18: Summer Checklist - 12 Things to Accomplish This Summer

    Episode 18: Summer Checklist - 12 Things to Accomplish This Summer

    Eight weeks from now, many will look back and wonder what happened to the summer break. Complete even a few of the items on this summer checklist, and you'll likely have had a productive college prep summer.


    Start a project (See episode #14 for details).
    scholarships.chadcargill.com


    Research colleges and majors (Upcoming episodes to discuss).


    Tour a few college campuses both large and small, near and far.


    Review 4-year high school course plan (See episode #5 as an example for math).


    Review college courses required for different majors (Upcoming episode to discuss).


    Work a blue collor job or fast-food job and save money.


    Get your prep book and start working lessons.


    Take a CLEP test for a subject just completed in high school (See episode #17).


    If you ordered a past ACT, start analyzing misses (see episode #4 how to do this).


    Practice speed reading.
    speedreading.chadcargill.com


    Read consistently.


    Love people!




    I’d love to connect with you and keep you posted on upcoming episodes and resources. For a free downloadable pdf What Scholarship Committees Look for and How to Win Them, go to scholarships.chadcargill.com, and get your guide now.


    For a free downloadable pdf of Key Things You Must Know on Test Day, go to [testday.chadcargill.com](testday.chadcargill.com), and get your guide now.


    If you enjoyed the podcast, please leave a review on your podcast app. Leave a shout out for your high school, and I may read it on a future podcast.


    If you have questions, leave a comment here or on the Chad Cargill Workshops Facebook page.


    To view the workshop calendar, go to calendar.chadcargill.com. You can also order the prep book Chad Cargill's ACT and sign up for speed reading at chadcargill.com. If you are interested in hosting a workshop at your high school, call our office at (405) 454-3233 or email penny@chadcargill.com.


    chadcargill.com
    Twitter: @ChadCargill


    Thanks for listening to the podcast!

    • 23 min
    Episode 17: CLEP Tests and Why You Should Take Them

    Episode 17: CLEP Tests and Why You Should Take Them

    "CLEP exams help students earn college credit for what they already know, for a fraction of the cost of a college course." -College Board CLEP website


    $89 (Subject to change) plus small administration fee charged by test center.


    Most tests last 90 minutes.


    Key CLEP Facts:


    Students take CLEP exams on a computer at official CLEP test centers.
    CLEP exams contain multiple-choice questions.
    CLEP exams take about 90–120 minutes to complete, depending on the exam subject.
    CLEP exams are offered year-round at more than 2,000 CLEP test centers across the country.
    Students receive their CLEP exam scores immediately after completing the exam (except for College Composition and Spanish with Writing).
    More than 2,900 U.S. colleges and universities grant credit for CLEP. A college’s CLEP credit policy explains:


    -Which CLEP exams are accepted by the institution
    -What CLEP score you need to receive credit
    -How many credits are awarded for a particular CLEP exam


    The policy may also include other guidelines, such as the maximum number of credits a student can earn through CLEP. Before signing up for a CLEP exam, talk with your academic advisor to figure out how an exam fits in with your education plan." -From clep.collegeboard.com website


    Who Can Take CLEP Exams?


    Anyone interested in earning college credit and saving time and money can take a CLEP exam. CLEP launched in 1967 as a way for adult students and military service members to earn degrees inexpensively while also being able to meet work and family responsibilities.
    34 different exams are offered for CLEP credit:


    Composition and Literature
    These exams cover topics related to American and British literature and composition.


    American Literature
    Analyzing and Interpreting Literature
    College Composition
    College Composition Modular
    English Literature
    Humanities


    World Languages
    These exams assess comprehension of French, German, and Spanish.


    French Language: Levels 1 and 2
    German Language: Levels 1 and 2
    Spanish Language: Levels 1 and 2
    Spanish with Writing: Levels 1 and 2


    History and Social Sciences
    These exams cover topics related to history, economics, and psychology.


    American Government
    History of the United States I
    History of the United States II
    Human Growth and Development
    Introduction to Educational Psychology
    Introductory Psychology
    Introductory Sociology
    Principles of Macroeconomics
    Principles of Microeconomics
    Social Sciences and History
    Western Civilization I: Ancient Near East to 1648
    Western Civilization II: 1648 to the Present


    Science and Mathematics
    These exams cover various science disciplines and different levels of math.


    Biology
    Calculus
    Chemistry
    College Algebra
    College Mathematics
    Natural Sciences
    Precalculus


    Business
    These exams cover various business disciplines.


    Financial Accounting
    Information Systems
    Introductory Business Law
    Principles of Management
    Principles of Marketing




    Search for the college or university on the College Board website by clicking on "See Which Colleges Accept CLEP."


    For Example:


    Oklahoma State University in Stillwater accepts these for credit:


    OSU - Stillwater
    Exams, Minimum Score for Credit, Credit Hours Awarded


    Business
    Financial Accounting, 50, 3
    Introductory Business Law, 50, 3
    Principles of Management, 50, 3
    Principles of Marketing, 50, 3


    Composition and Literature
    College Composition, 54, 3


    Foreign Languages
    French Language Level I, 50, 6
    French Language Level II, 59, 9
    German Language Level I, 50, 6
    German Language Level II, 60, 9
    Spanish Language Level I, 50, 6
    Spanish Language Level II, 63, 9


    History and Social Sciences
    American Government, 50, 3
    Human Growth and Development, 50, 3
    Introduction to Educational Psychology, 50, 3
    Introductory Psychology, 50, 3
    Introductory Sociology, 50, 3
    Principles of Macroeconomics, 50, 3
    Principles of Microeco

    • 18 min
    Episode 16: Part 4 of 4: Scholarships - How to Lose in an Interview

    Episode 16: Part 4 of 4: Scholarships - How to Lose in an Interview

    Avoid these interview mistakes:
    • Glance at watch
    • Chum up with friend on interview staff
    • Only look at one person when answering
    • Hold pencil or pen and play with it during interview
    • Chew gum
    • Lounge, slump, or recline in chair
    • When brought into interview room (area), interviewee just grabs a chair without being
    told where to sit
    • Elaborates on one answer too long
    • Starts questioning interviewer with questions like the following:
    -"Well, what would you do?"
    -"What are your thoughts on this subject?"
    -"Tell me what is your biggest weakness?"
    • Gets overly excited about an answer (ex. A football player talking about a game.)
    • Say phrases like (you know, yah, honestly, okay, sure, man, etc.) Not that being personal is bad, but overusing these phrases takes away from the quality of you and your answers.
    • Set like a statue with a moving mouth and blinking eyes only
    • Many exaggerated movements with hands, arms, back (leaning), and legs (crossing and
    shaking).
    • Repetitive finger movements like twiddling thumbs, cracking knuckles, or taping fingers.
    • Use large words that you really don't know what they mean (proverbial, paradigm, diabolical, etc.) If you really know what they mean and they are appropriate, then use them.
    • Blame someone else for a problem you had. Make excuses for your actions.
    • Be overly arrogant. Just brag on yourself beyond what is appropriate.
    • Correct the interviewer's grammar or pronunciation of a word.
    • Interrupt the interviewer's question with something you want to say.
    • Answer a different question than was asked.
    • Answer a question by talking negatively about yourself
    • Answer every question in very general terms. Never be specific about any experience or quality you have.
    • Get noticeably frustrated with the interviewer when he/she asks very specific questions about an uncomfortable topic for you.
    • Answer questions about a team by taking all the credit and giving no credit to the team.
    • Have the interviewee's cell phone, pager, or watch alarm sound.
    • Assuming this is a job interview, ask, "How much vacation do I get?"


    Here are a few interview elements that are acceptable, but students may perceive them as bad.
    • The interviewee pausing a few seconds before answering a really difficult question.
    • The interviewee getting choked, coughing several times, and asking for a drink of water
    or a very quick break for a drink.

    • 25 min
    Episode 15: Part 3 of 4: Scholarships - How to Win in the Interview

    Episode 15: Part 3 of 4: Scholarships - How to Win in the Interview

    Interviews are inevitable. We all have to face them. You will have interviews for scholarships, clubs, organizations, internships, and ultimately permanent jobs.
    You should review potential, common questions you may be asked in an interview. Consider the questions and formulate a brief answer. Write a few bullet points for each question. Before you go to an interview, review your answers as practice. You can also have a friend ask you these questions as practice.


    INTERVIEWING BASICS
    • Dress appropriately
    Boys should wear a suit with a reasonable tie. The tie should just cover the buckle of the belt. The belt should match the color of the shoes. Shoes should be brown or black. Do not wear white socks. Pants should completely cover your socks and the back of the pant leg should reach the heel of your shoe. A black, gray, or dark blue suit is recommended. A well pressed white or light blue shirt is recommended as well. You should also consider wearing a T-shirt under your dress shirt especially if the dress shirt is thin. Select a shirt with a comfortable collar. You do not want to be tugging at the neck of your shirt during an interview.
    Girls should wear a business attire such as a dress or pant suit. The suit should be a dark solid color, although this is not absolutely necessary. Avoid flashy or revealing clothes. Skirts should not be too short or too long. An inch or two on either side of the knee is acceptable. Be cautious of the skirt appearing too short when you are sitting. Make sure no undergarments can be seen in any way. Avoid clothes that easily wrinkle as you may be in them for a long period of time. Avoid elaborate jewelry. You want the interviewer to focus on your answers, not on your jewelry. A small purse with a shoulder strap is acceptable. Make sure the color of the purse matches your shoes.
    • Ask questions
    Prepare good questions to ask at the end of the interview. Asking a question such as "When can I expect to hear something?" is appropriate.
    • Research
    Do as much research about the company, scholarship, organization, etc. as possible prior to the interview. If you can find out who is going to be interviewing you, learn as much as you can about him/her and his/her position/title/responsibilities as well.


    Common questions might include the following:



    Tell me a little about yourself.
    What are your strengths?
    What is your biggest weakness? (Turn this into a positive. Answer with something like "I think I can accomplish anything; therefore, I tend to overwork because I will finish anything I start regardless of the difficulty.")
    What accomplishment are you most proud of and why?
    Who do you most admire and why?
    Identify a conflict you have encountered and how you handled that conflict?
    Identify a situation where you have taken a leadership role and how you handled that position?
    Do you view yourself as a leader or a follower? Why?
    Why should we select you?
    What do you not like about yourself?
    Who is your role model?
    What type of decisions do you struggle making?
    Describe yourself 20 years from now?
    What is your anticipated major? Why?
    What could you have done better in high school?
    How would you respond if I said that your interview was not very good?
    Identify a time that you had to take a chance and how you handled the situation.
    Tell me why we should select you.
    Name one thing that best describes you.
    Name one cartoon character that best describes you and tell why.
    Name one adjective that best describes you.
    Do others try to be like you? Why?
    Have you ever "stretched the truth" in an interview or on a resume?

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

Erock541 ,

Excellent!

Definitely a must listen to for parents, students and educators! This is full of practical information to help students in their journey to college.

Diane Portillo ,

Great Info for College Bound Students & Their Parents

Great information! I just listened to episode one and can’t wait to hear the rest. I’m a parent of a Washington High School student and she attended your session in February. She learned some great information then too.

Psteelman1 ,

Great info!

I thoroughly enjoyed hearing Chad’s story and the info he shared in the first episode. Truly great info for me to be considering for my high schooler.

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