37 episodes

A soporific, non-pharmaceutical aide with which to ease your descent into sleep, or, alternatively, to awaken your literary passion. Pass an hour with me, and you’ll hear read in a soothing, tranquil voice the greatest works to which voice can be given.

Finneran's Wake Daniel Ethan Finneran

    • Arts

A soporific, non-pharmaceutical aide with which to ease your descent into sleep, or, alternatively, to awaken your literary passion. Pass an hour with me, and you’ll hear read in a soothing, tranquil voice the greatest works to which voice can be given.

    Ep. 35 - The Five Greatest Christmas Poems You MUST Read!

    Ep. 35 - The Five Greatest Christmas Poems You MUST Read!

    Season's Greetings, one and all! Around this joyous time of year, we're inundated by lists proclaiming absolute knowledge of the best Christmas films and songs, but little mention is ever made of the best Christmas poems...

    Until now!

    Listen along, and learn about the five greatest Christmas poems written by Virgil, Milton, Tennyson, Eliot, and Hardy.

    Happy Holidays, my learned friends!

    • 24 min
    Ep. 34 - Virgil, The Pagan Poet Who Predicted The Birth of Christ

    Ep. 34 - Virgil, The Pagan Poet Who Predicted The Birth of Christ

    "Ours is the crowning era foretold in prophecy: born of time, a great new cycle of centuries begins. Justice returns to earth, the Golden Age returns, and its first-born comes down from heaven above..."

    And just who might this heavenly "first-born" child be? From what royal eminence does he descend? From what divine seed is he made? To whom shall he return, when his hour on this earthy stage is through?

    We leave it to Virgil, the pagan saint of Dante's dream, to answer these great questions. I could think of no better passage than the Mantuan's "Fourth Eclogue" to bring in the holiday season. Enjoy!

    • 25 min
    Ep. 33 - Everything You Need To Know About Aristotle

    Ep. 33 - Everything You Need To Know About Aristotle

    "One swallow does not a summer make, nor one fine day; similarly one day or brief time of happiness does not make a person entirely happy”. Does this apply to podcasts as well? Does one episode not a wise man make? Can you not comprehend all of Aristotle in twenty minutes? You'll have to listen to find out...

    • 21 min
    Ep. 32 - The "Poetess" | Sappho

    Ep. 32 - The "Poetess" | Sappho

    “Some there are who say that the fairest thing seen on the black earth is an array of horsemen; some, men marching; some would say ships; but I say she whom one loves best is the loveliest". She bats her eyes and smiles at the competition, secure in the knowledge that there is no thing, and doubtless no person, by whom her radiant beauty and unutterable loveliness will ever be surpassed. She is, we well know, the fairest thing of all--the immortal object of Sapphic adoration and rhyme, the fully-formed Venus emerging from the frothy, misty sea.

    • 42 min
    Ep. 31 - The History Of The Peloponnesian War | Thucydides

    Ep. 31 - The History Of The Peloponnesian War | Thucydides

    “Our institutions do not emulate the laws of others. We do not copy our neighbors: rather, we are an example to them. Our system is called a democracy, for it respects the majority and not the few”. To this day, some two and a half millennia hence, Athens still remains an example to its neighbors. Mounted high above us, she enjoys the lonely summit of grandeur and refinement to which every civilization hopes to ascend. She alone breathes this thin air to which we’ll never be fully acclimatized. The greatness of any age, the perfection of any epoch, shines less brilliantly when held next to the dazzling prosperity of Pericles’ tenure.

    Here, in our first discussion of Thucydides, the most scrutinizing and professional historian ever to have lived, we will delve into the peculiarities of this renowned city state, whose rapid acquisition of territory and power threatened her Peloponnesian neighbors to the point of war. In the following, we will touch on the famous passages from Thucydides’ classic work, including his depiction of Corinth’s hostile assessment of the Athenians, Pericles’ Funeral Oration at the end of the war’s first year, the devastating plague by which Athens was afflicted, and the morally bereft Melian Dialogue.

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Ep. 30 - The Lives Of The Twelve Caesars | Suetonius

    Ep. 30 - The Lives Of The Twelve Caesars | Suetonius

    "He had a desire to secure eternal and perpetual fame, but his method was ill-advised. For he abolished the old names of many things and places and gave them new ones based on his own, so that he termed the month of April, 'Neroneus' and he had a plan to give Rome the name of 'Neropolis'". Can you guess the emperor about whom Suetonius is speaking? Matricide, fratricide, the attempted genocide of the Christians, the burning of his own imperial city--only one figure in history has such a lengthy laundry list of crimes. In this episode, we'll cover the Roman historian, Suetonius and that foul emperor, Nero, of whom he gave us such a daunting account.

    • 28 min

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