100 episodes

GeekWire brings you the week's latest technology news, trends and insights, covering the world of technology from our home base in Seattle. Our regular news podcast features commentary and analysis from our editors and reporters, plus interviews with special guests.

GeekWire GeekWire

    • News
    • 4.8 • 92 Ratings

GeekWire brings you the week's latest technology news, trends and insights, covering the world of technology from our home base in Seattle. Our regular news podcast features commentary and analysis from our editors and reporters, plus interviews with special guests.

    How the pandemic is taking a toll on collaboration; AI, ML and the NFL; Listener feedback

    How the pandemic is taking a toll on collaboration; AI, ML and the NFL; Listener feedback

    Remote work is putting productivity and innovation at risk. That was one of the conclusions of a peer-reviewed study of more than 61,000 Microsoft employees, published this week, and it’s our first topic this week.

    We talk about the workplace dynamics that are creating the situation, and explain why the implications go far beyond Microsoft’s workforce as the COVID-19 Delta variant pushes back the return to the office.

    Plus, how predictive analytics and machine learning could change the NFL and other sports, and a preview of the GeekWire Summit, featuring Amazon CEO Andy Jassy, pop superstar Ciara, and a lineup of top leaders in tech, business and science. 

    For the audiophiles in the audience, our listener feedback section offers another important clarification in our seemingly never-ending discussion of the Blue Yeti microphone. 

    A special request for loyal listeners: Help us get to 100 reviews on Apple Podcasts!

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 28 min
    U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal: Amazon, antitrust, and the future of big tech

    U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal: Amazon, antitrust, and the future of big tech

    GeekWire's Mike Lewis talks with U.S. Representative Pramila Jayapal, a Democrat who represents the 7th Congressional District in Washington state, including Amazon’s hometown of Seattle. Rep. Jayapal is also the Vice Chair of the House Antitrust Subcommittee, and the author of a bill that aims to prevent what it calls monopolistic practices by big tech companies including Amazon. In addition to antitrust issues, they discuss online privacy, vaccine mandates and infrastructure spending.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 24 min
    Startup secrets; Windows 11 launch; In defense of the Blue Yeti

    Startup secrets; Windows 11 launch; In defense of the Blue Yeti

    A global pandemic might seem like the wrong time to pursue a new startup idea, given all the uncertainties, but in many ways, the timing couldn't be better.

    That's one of the insights from our GeekWire Podcast conversation this week with Seattle-area entrepreneur and investor Shirish Nadkarni, author of the book From Startup to Exit: An Insider’s Guide to Launching and Scaling your Tech Business. 

    The changes in user behavior and tech platform shifts caused by the pandemic dovetail with one of the lessons Nadkarni is hoping to get across to entrepreneurs.

    "Look for opportunities where there is either some major technology shift or some macro trend that either surfaces an old problem, or enables you to build a solution in a unique fashion that could not be done before," Nadkarni says. "I think those are the best opportunities for an idea to succeed."

    We also talk about startup opportunities in artificial intelligence and machine learning; the impact of the IPO and SPAC craze on startup psychology; and the effect of remote work on investing and recruiting.

    Nadkarni founded mobile wireless email pioneer TeamOn Systems, acquired by Blackberry in 2002, and co-founded language learning site Livemocha, acquired by RosettaStone in 2013. He began his career at Microsoft, working on Windows development tools, overseeing MSN's transition into a web portal, and leading Microsoft’s Hotmail acquisition. 

    In the news this week ...
    Microsoft announced an Oct. 5 release date for Windows 11, but said it won't be making Android apps available on the new OS until a later date, under a partnership with Amazon.
    Seattle-based money remittance company Remitly disclosed key financial results on its path to its upcoming IPO. It posted $257 million in revenue and a $32.5 million net loss in 2020.

    And in our final segment, we hear from a loyal listener, Steve Case (no, not the AOL founder), with feedback on our recent behind-the-scenes episode about the audio technology we use for the show. I had critical things to say about the Blue Yeti mic on the show, to which Steve gave this response:

    I like and use the Blue Yeti (with an external pop filter). It was the logical choice when I was doing a bit of voiceover, and pondering podcasting. The Yeti is perfect for podcasting because of its three condenser capsules and four modes, so it’s good for one person (cardioid mode) or interviewing someone in person (bi-directional mode). Of course that was back in the pre-quarantine days when we might actually sit on the other side of a microphone from someone outside of our household.

    Many people who use these for podcasts, YouTube videos and the like, don't seem to understand the modes – or even which side to talk into. This is a side-address microphone, but I see people talking into the end of it, or even into the back side when using cardioid mode. Then there are the folks way too close to the mic, without a pop guard, and the gain set to full. The built-in gain control is a great feature, but with the power to change gain at the microphone comes the responsibility to set it appropriately.

    Noted! Thanks to Steve for his insights. You can reach us at podcast@geekwire.com with your thoughts on mic technology or anything else we discuss on the show.

    Audio editing by Curt Milton. Theme music by Daniel L.K. Caldwell.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 35 min
    Inside the White House cybersecurity summit with Hadi Partovi of Code.org

    Inside the White House cybersecurity summit with Hadi Partovi of Code.org

    President Joe Biden brought together top executives from the nation's biggest technology, financial services and energy companies this week to address the growing challenge of cybersecurity, speaking to tech leaders including Amazon CEO Andy Jassy, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and Apple CEO Tim Cook.

    "The federal government can't meet this challenge alone," Biden said in his public remarks to open the meeting. "I've invited you all here today because you have the power and the capacity and the responsibility, I believe, to raise the bar on cybersecurity. And so, ultimately, we've got a lot of work to do."

    So what happened next? And did any real solutions emerge? Our guest on this episode of the GeekWire Podcast was in the closed-door meeting. Seattle-area investor and entrepreneur Hadi Partovi, CEO of computer science education nonprofit Code.org, shares details and key takeaways on this week's show.

    In the third segment, Partovi reflects on his own childhood in Iran, as a 6-year-old during the 1979 revolution, later immigrating to the U.S. with his family, and finding success as a computer scientist and entrepreneur along with his twin brother, Ali, who joined him in founding Code.org. 

    Read his full thread on that topic and see our earlier coverage.

    See GeekWire.com for more.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 46 min
    Inside our hybrid studio: GeekWire's tech tips and tricks for the latest twist in virtual meetings

    Inside our hybrid studio: GeekWire's tech tips and tricks for the latest twist in virtual meetings

    The last 18 months have been an audio-visual adventure, requiring many of us to improve and refine our at-home tech setups for virtual meetings and remote work. 

    And just when we thought we'd figured it out, we were hit with a new scenario entirely: hybrid work, with some people together in the office, and others dialing in from home. Getting things to work seamlessly in these situations is no easy task.

    This can be especially challenging when you're trying to get good sound. We’ve struggled with this latest twist on GeekWire's podcasts, with multiple people in the studio, for example, and others joining us remotely. We’ve figured it out, mostly, through lots of trial and error — emphasis on the error.

    We're sharing our hard-won lessons on this behind-the-scenes episode of the GeekWire Podcast, including details on hardware and software we’ve been using. 

    Even if you're not recording audio or video, or producing your own show, we hope these insights might help with your own hybrid meetings and events. 

    We use a few of our favorite mics to record the show, letting you hear the difference in quality. In addition, we discuss mics to avoid, based on our experience.

    Also making an appearance are some new Microsoft headsets and microphones that we’ve been trying out on loan from the company. 

    Stepping out from behind the virtual booth to participate in this episode is Curt Milton, who edits and produces the GeekWire Podcast every week. 

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 28 min
    How SPACs are shaking up Seattle's startup scene

    How SPACs are shaking up Seattle's startup scene

    An online marketplace that helps to facilitate trade between marijuana sellers and buyers will soon see its own stock traded on the Nasdaq.

    Another that connects pet owners with walkers, boarders and other caregivers just posted its first earnings as a publicly traded company.

    And a 3-year-old Redmond-based biotech company with a mere 25 employees just raised $80 million its stock market debut.

    SPACs are shaking up Seattle's startup scene. On this episode of the GeekWire Podcast, we examine how special purpose acquisition companies are turning startups into publicly traded stocks at a rapid clip. The SPAC phenomenon is giving many of these companies access to additional sources of capital while creating new risks for investors and raising questions about the long-term direction of the stock market.

    Our guest (and guest audio editor) is Laurel Deppen, a journalist who has been working as an intern at GeekWire in Seattle this summer through the Dow Jones News Fund, reporting a wide range of stories about the region's tech and business community, including an earlier story about soon-to-be public online cannabis marketplace Leafly.

    She studied broadcast journalism at Western Kentucky University, where she was editor-in-chief of the College Heights Herald, and in addition to joining us for the podcast conversation, she edited this episode as one of the final assignments of her summer internship.

    In the second segment of the show, we talk with Laurel about her overall impressions of Seattle as a newcomer to the city, as documented in part in her story, How Bumble BFF helped this Kentucky transplant find friends and break The Seattle Freeze.

    And in our final segment, it's the return of the Random Channel, our segment exploring the random things that caught our attention this week. Laurel talks about the HBO drama The White Lotus, GeekWire co-founder John Cook suggests the new podcast The Edge, and I share my enthusiasm about recent episodes of Kara Swisher's New York Times podcast, Pivot.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
92 Ratings

92 Ratings

Benja455 ,

Awesome Update On All Things Seattle/Tech

I wish I still lived in Ballard so I could just chat with this folks at the breweries! Highly recommended!

Mmmmmmieieiejduhuunurnuf ,

Great interviews and insights

Underrated and well-made podcast on the tech industry in Seattle and beyond.

zorbadgreek ,

Pretty good, but not exceptional

Geekwire is the main tech journalism platform in Seattle. The reporting is solid. This podcast is above average but nothing exceptional. If you’re looking for information only, reading the articles online will do you fine. If you want some banter about them, this podcast will also do fine. However, the podcast is too short to go into any real depth on any one topic. Usually the format is 1) bring up an article headline 2) describe the gist in one minute 3) get the hosts hot take on it 4) repeat 5) end with some random stuff the hosts think is interesting. Not bad at all. Just not all that exceptional.

Top Podcasts In News

Listeners Also Subscribed To