244 episodes

Green Side Up is a gardening program produced by University of Illinois Extension. It is hosted by Richard Hentschel, Extension Educator, Horticulture.

Green Side Up Richard Hentschel

    • Education

Green Side Up is a gardening program produced by University of Illinois Extension. It is hosted by Richard Hentschel, Extension Educator, Horticulture.

    Help houseplants through the winter

    Help houseplants through the winter

    About the author: Richard Hentschel’s expertise extends across several subject areas with specialties in lawn care, fruit tree production, woody ornamentals, and home and community gardening. During his 45-year career in horticulture and agriculture, Hentschel became a well-known and respected expert for commercial and homeowner audiences, industry organizations, and media. He retired from University of Illinois Extension in April 2022 with nearly 30 years of service as a Horticulture Specialist and Educator in northern Illinois.


    Horticulture Educator Richard Hentschel discusses keeping our houseplants as healthy as possible during the low light levels of winter. Which window you use? How far away they are from the window or other sources of light make a big difference. There are a variety of lighting options today that were not around even 10 years ago.

    • 5 min
    How to keep your Christmas tree fresh

    How to keep your Christmas tree fresh

    Richard Hentschel, host of Green Side Up, discusses the history of our holiday tree and current good practices to keep the tree as fresh as possible once in the home. Fresh trees will have a good smell, needles, and stems will bend and won’t be losing a lot of needles. Families can cut their own, starting a great tradition, or selecting from a local organization’s tree lot. Initial watering of the tree is key to having a tree last several weeks indoors.

    • 3 min
    Winterize the home orchard

    Winterize the home orchard

    University of Illinois Extension Educator Richard Hentschel shares how to winterize the home orchard. Two primary concerns are preventing damage from: 1) cold weather damage and 2) rodents. Whether it is rabbits or field mice, using protective wraps and wire fencing are still the best way to prevent feeding damage. Cold weather damage can also be prevented by wrapping the young tender trunk to prevent both frost cracks and sun scalding. This will need to be done for at least the first winter.

    • 5 min
    Don't forget late fall gardening tasks

    Don't forget late fall gardening tasks

    GSU Host Richard Hentschel discusses the last of the gardening season. November gardening gives us a chance to finish up routine projects and to catch up on overdue gardening tasks. Late season vegetable gardening can mean harvesting the last of the root crops and healing them in at the edge of the garden for easy retrieval throughout the winter. Final clean-up of the garden and the last of the leaf pick-up means utilizing the compost pile again. As the season ends, garden equipment needs to be cleaned and stored properly for the winter too.

    • 5 min
    Fall is a good time to start composting

    Fall is a good time to start composting

    University of Illinois Extension Educator Richard Hentschel discusses the merits of composting and why late summer and fall are good times to start. It is easy since all the ingredients are readily available this time of year – lawn clippings for the greens, fallen leaves for the browns, a bit of garden soil, and water from the hose. The location can be an out of the way spot in the yard or behind the garage or garden shed, yet somewhere convenient.

    • 6 min
    Time to bring the houseplants back inside

    Time to bring the houseplants back inside

    Green Side Up Host Richard Hentschel discusses one of those gardening chores that catches us off guard, bringing in the houseplants that have been outside for the summer. With a little planning and inspection, that job can be a lot easier and timely. The main trigger is the weather forecast showing that first frosty night. Houseplants need to be in before those very cool nights, as most of our houseplants are tropical in origin. Learn how to bring them in without pests and how to decide which houseplants to save and which to send to the compost bin.

    • 4 min

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