12 episodes

For Melissa Moore, 1995 was a nightmare. That’s the year the teenager learned her father, Keith Hunter Jesperson, was a serial killer. It’s also the year Melissa Moore’s doubt spiral began: When you look like your father, and you share his intelligence and charisma, how do you know you’re not a psychopath, too? Happy Face is the story of Keith Hunter Jesperson, his brutal crimes, and the cat and mouse game he played with detectives and the media. But it’s also the story of the horrific legacy he gifted his children. Join Melissa Moore as she investigates her father’s crimes, reckons with the past, and wades through her darkest fears as she hunts for a better future.

Happy Face HowStuffWorks

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.4, 6.6K Ratings

For Melissa Moore, 1995 was a nightmare. That’s the year the teenager learned her father, Keith Hunter Jesperson, was a serial killer. It’s also the year Melissa Moore’s doubt spiral began: When you look like your father, and you share his intelligence and charisma, how do you know you’re not a psychopath, too? Happy Face is the story of Keith Hunter Jesperson, his brutal crimes, and the cat and mouse game he played with detectives and the media. But it’s also the story of the horrific legacy he gifted his children. Join Melissa Moore as she investigates her father’s crimes, reckons with the past, and wades through her darkest fears as she hunts for a better future.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
6.6K Ratings

6.6K Ratings

wldeckermiller ,

Victims Get Revictimized

I can’t imagine what life has been like for Melissa Moore. But I have to wonder if continually bringing up the subject of her father’s crimes in media is a good idea for her health. I e seen her before in an episode or two of various crime TV shows. Then she got her own TV show where she went to the families of her father’s victims to apologize and hear their stories.

It’s because of one episode in that series that I struggle to listen to this podcast. One of the mothers of the victims tells Melissa to stop bringing all of her father’s crimes into the spotlight. Every time Melissa does, it re- reals the hearts of the families. They have to go through their pain and anguish again and again.

I like true crime podcasts but for some reason this one bothers me tremendously. It’s like Melissa needs the attention to give herself absolution for her father’s crimes. Where is a good therapist to tell her she is blameless? She was a kid. A little kid who could no more control her father’s actions than she could control the weather.

Let’s stop giving this woman attention so she can stop giving her father attention.

Brian_draws ,

Awful music

Decent story but it’s constantly interrupted with music that goes on so long at times you’ll forget what’s happening. You can hardly get more than 40 seconds before the loud acoustic guitar and singing comes back. Ruins the experience.

thisnicknameistaken10090 ,

Music is good

You have to be creatively sterile to not enjoy the music in this podcast. It’s appropriate and the story is well told.

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by HowStuffWorks