9 episodes

Hear-Tell: a podcast about telling true stories from the Low-Residency MFA in Narrative Nonfiction program at the University of Georgia. Visit bit.ly/heartellpodcast for more.

Hear-Tell heartell

    • Arts
    • 4.7 • 12 Ratings

Hear-Tell: a podcast about telling true stories from the Low-Residency MFA in Narrative Nonfiction program at the University of Georgia. Visit bit.ly/heartellpodcast for more.

    Ep.8: Jeremy Redmon, "December 21 and What Came After

    Ep.8: Jeremy Redmon, "December 21 and What Came After

    2019 MFA graduate Jeremy Redmon reads an essay called “December 21 and What Came After,” about his experiences as a reporter embedded with U.S. troops in Iraq. The essay was originally published by The WarHorse, a nonprofit new website dedicated to telling stories about military service and the impact of war.Redmon’s essay explores what drew him to covering armed conflict, what working in a war zone taught him about his Air Force veteran father, and the lasting impact of trauma on his life.A veteran journalist, Redmon currently reports for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 

    • 55 min
    Ep.7: MFA Students Read Short Narratives, Pt. 2

    Ep.7: MFA Students Read Short Narratives, Pt. 2

    Current MFA students Alison Miller, Will Alford, Sierra Williams, and Stephanie Paladino read short narrative essays composed during their low-residency coursework over the past year. Their stories introduce us to fascinating characters and take us to communities across the US and Global South. We'll meet independent wrestlers, awkward roommates, stifling small towns, and almost romances. This episode is the second Hear-Tell episode produced from the safety of the homes of our guests and host. Considering the health of our contributors, the show will continue in this fashion for the near future. To learn more about Hear-Tell, visit https://grady.uga.edu/graduate_studies/hear-tell/.Follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook at @heartellpodcast. 

    • 26 min
    Ep. 6: MFA Students Read Short Narrative Essays

    Ep. 6: MFA Students Read Short Narrative Essays

    Kim Lute, Tom Cullen, Jasmin Pittman Morrell, and Diana Keough read short narrative essays composed during their low-residency coursework over the past year. The stories share the theme of family, and consider the lessons our ancestors and loved ones provide us today. This episode is the first Hear-Tell episode produced from the safety of the homes of our guests and host. Considering the health of our contributors in light of the continuing coronavirus pandemic, the show will continue in this fashion for the near future. Follow Hear-Tell on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

    • 18 min
    Ep. 5: Karen Thomas, "Traveling Graces"

    Ep. 5: Karen Thomas, "Traveling Graces"

    Karen Thomas, a 2017 MFA graduate, reads an essay called "Traveling Graces," which is adapted from a chapter from an in-progress book project currently titled "Stealing Away: Alzheimer's and One African-American Family's Journey," which is currently seeking a publisher. The story follows the day Thomas moved her mother, who had Alzheimer's and died in 2016, into an assisted living facility. The plan had been long in the making, but when moving day finally arrived, Thomas worried if that decision was truly for the best.Following a distinguished career in newspaper journalism, Thomas now serves as a professor of practice at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. 

    • 39 min
    Ep. 4: Samantha Bresnahan, "In the Blood, Flowers Bloom"

    Ep. 4: Samantha Bresnahan, "In the Blood, Flowers Bloom"

    Samantha Bresnahan, a 2018 MFA graduate, reads a chapter from her book “In the Blood, Flowers Bloom,” which is currently seeking a publisher.The story follows American and Japanese veterans of Iwo Jima during World War II and how the keepsakes that soldiers took from enemies kept the battle alive long after the fighting stopped. Bresnahan’s story concerns the trauma of war, but is ultimately about the necessity of reconciliation and forgiveness, no matter how long that takes.Bresnahan is a senior writer and copy editor at CNN in the international features division, where she has worked for more than a decade.

    • 53 min
    Ep. 3: John T Edge, "My Mother's Catfish Stew"

    Ep. 3: John T Edge, "My Mother's Catfish Stew"

    John T. Edge reads his essay “My Mother’s Catfish Stew,” originally published in the Oxford American, about a son’s duty toward family memories and his mother’s legacy.Edge is the author of “The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South.” He’s the director of the Southern Foodways Alliance and host of ESPN’s True South. Edge is also an original member of the Low-Residency MFA in Narrative Nonfiction at UGA faculty. In the episode, Edge discusses the changing role of the first person in his writing and what he learned about narrative craft by exploring his personal life on the page.

    • 51 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

3furu ,

Creative vs. Narrative?

‘Excited and very much looking forward to hearing these literary narratives.

’Appreciated hearing Valerie Boyd’s explanation of the term “literary narrative”, and her thought process to select it in a school of journalism.

User1:;?'lfu ,

Great interview

The host (known to me) asks great questions and guides a lovely discussion. Check it out!

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