34 episodes

Hearing the Pulitzers: A piece-by-piece, episode-by-episode exploration of the winners of the Pulitzer Prize in Music with hosts Andrew Granade and David Thurmaier.

Hearing The Pulitzers hearingthepulitzers

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    • 4.7 • 15 Ratings

Hearing the Pulitzers: A piece-by-piece, episode-by-episode exploration of the winners of the Pulitzer Prize in Music with hosts Andrew Granade and David Thurmaier.

    Episode 33 - 1975: Dominick Argento, From the Diary of Virginia Woolf

    Episode 33 - 1975: Dominick Argento, From the Diary of Virginia Woolf

    In this episode, Dave and Andrew explore the first song cycle to ever win the Pulitzer Prize, Dominick Argento's From the Diary of Virginia Woolf. Argento always remarked that his music balanced between his desire for fantasy and his need for control. Do Dave and Andrew think this work has that balance?



     

    If you'd like more information about Dominick Argento, we recommend:

    Jacquelyn Matava's dissertation "Dominick Argento's From the Diary of Virginia Woolf: A Preparation Guide for Performers" (Indiana University, 2014)
    Russell Platt's New Yorker article "The Elegant Musical Vessels of Dominick Argento"
    Argento's memoir, Catalogue Raisonnâe as Memoir: A Composer's Life (University of Minnesota Press, 2004)
     

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    • 25 min
    Episode 32 - 1974: Donald Martino, Notturno

    Episode 32 - 1974: Donald Martino, Notturno

    In this episode, Dave and Andrew discuss a composer who is usually considered a 12-tone composer, but who also rejected labels. He famously told the New York Times in 1997 that "If anyone writes program notes and says I am a Serial or a 12-tone composer, I am infuriated." How do Dave and Andrew label Martino's music? How does Notturno fit into the style of other winners in the early 1970s?



     

    If you'd like more information about Donald Martino and Notturno, we recommend:

    James Praznik's 2022 dissertation "Dreaming of Single Hexachords in an Infinite Expanse: An Analysis of Movement II of Donald Martino’s Notturno"
    The collection of articles in tribute to Martino in Perspectives of New Music 29/2 (Summer 1991)
    Bruce Duffie's interview with Martino

    • 32 min
    Episode 31 - 1973: Elliott Carter, String Quartet No. 3

    Episode 31 - 1973: Elliott Carter, String Quartet No. 3

    In this episode, Dave and Andrew revisit Elliott Carter, who won his first Pulitzer in 1960. They awarded his String Quartet No. 2 two big thumbs up. Will they be as enthusiastic about Carter's String Quartet No. 3?



    If you'd like more information about Elliott Carter and his String Quartet No. 3, we recommend:

    This performance of the String Quartet No. 3 by the Jack Quartet.
    Andrew W. Mead's article "Pitch Structure in Elliott Carter's String Quartet No. 3" in Perspectives of New Music,  vol. 22, no. 1/2 (Autumn, 1983 - Summer, 1984): 31-60
    Laura Emmery's book Compositional Process in Elliott Carter's String Quartets: A Study in Sketches (Routledge, 2020)

    • 30 min
    Episode 30 - 1972: Jacob Druckman, Windows

    Episode 30 - 1972: Jacob Druckman, Windows

    In this episode, Dave and Andrew look through Windows at Jacob Druckman's compositional style and legacy in American music. Druckman taught at Yale and the Aspen Music Festival for years, shaping generations of young composers, and coined the term "New Romanticism" when he curated the Horizons Festivals at the NY Philharmonic in the mid-1980s. Yet today, his attempts to merge modernist techniques with audience-friendly sounds are largely forgotten. Should they be?



     

    If you'd like to know more about Druckman, we recommend:





    Nicholas Papador's dissertation Jacob Druckman: A Bio-Bibliography and Guide to Research, Northwestern University, 2003.
    Druckman's interview in Cole Gagne and Tracy Caras's Soundpieces: Interviews with American Composers (Scarecrow Press, 1982)
    Bruce Duffie speaks with Jacob Druckman




     

    • 25 min
    Episode 29 - 1971: Mario Davidovsky, Synchronisms No. 6

    Episode 29 - 1971: Mario Davidovsky, Synchronisms No. 6

    In this episode, Dave and Andrew discuss the first episode they have a personal connection to as Andrew has performed Mario Davidovsky's Synchronisms No. 6. How does Dave react to the third music winner to incorporate electronic sounds, and how do those sounds hold up 50 years later?

     



    If you'd like more information about Davidovsky, we recommend:




    Wesley True's lecture “Men, Music, and Machines. Some Thoughts Generated by the Practice and Performance of Mario Davidovsky’s Synchronisms #6 for Piano and Electronics” published in the Journal of the American Liszt Society vol. 9 (June 1981): 50-54.
    Eric Chasalow's "Mario Davidovsky, An Introduction,"
    Agni no. 50 (1999): 195-200.

    Davidovsky's bio page on the Edition Peters site.

    • 29 min
    Episode 28 - 1970: Charles Wuorinen, Time’s Encomium

    Episode 28 - 1970: Charles Wuorinen, Time’s Encomium

    In this episode, Dave and Andrew discuss the first fully electronic work to ever win a Pulitzer Prize, even though it was the only electronic work its composer ever wrote. Did Charles Wuorinen set a new standard for Pulitzer-winning music or was electronic music a flash in the pan?



     

    If you're interested in learning more about Wuorinen, we recommend:

    Charles Wuorinen's extensive website
    Elliott Schwartz's article "Electronic Music: A Thirty-Year Retrospective" in Music Educators Journal, Vol. 64, No. 7 (March 1978): 36-41.
    Perspective of New Music's "Charles Wuorinen: A Celebration at 80," Vol. 56, No. 2 (Summer 2018)

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

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